Adam Gilchrist plays Office Cricket at Booktopia HQ!

And who got him out? Watch the video and find out!

(PS: For a limited time, order your signed copy of Gilly’s illustrated memoir here)

adam-gilchrist-signed-copies-available-Adam Gilchrist

The Man, The Cricketer, The Legend

Going in first or seventh, wearing whites or colours, Adam Gilchrist was the most exhilarating cricketer of the modern age.

This is the most complete, intimate and fascinating illustrated autobiography of ‘Gilly’, one of the most loved sportsmen of his generation.

Featuring personal photographs, stories and precious keepsakes from Gilchrist’s private life and illustrious career, this book provides unprecedented access to Gilly, on and off the field. Peppered with anecdotes, reflections and jibes from friends, family and many of the biggest names in Australian and world cricket, this is the ultimate collection for sporting enthusiasts.

Grab a copy of Adam Gilchrist: The Man, The Cricketer, The Legend here

9781922213310-4 9781922213310-3

Grab a copy of Adam Gilchrist: The Man, The Cricketer, The Legend here

EXCLUSIVE INTERVIEW: Val McDermid on her incredible career, adapting Jane Austen, and Scottish Independence

Val McDermid’s novels have been translated into more than thirty languages, and have sold over eleven million copies. She chats to John Purcell about her latest novel The Skeleton Road and her amazing career.

Grab a copy of The Skeleton Road here

The Skeleton Road

by Val McDermid

When a skeleton is discovered hidden at the top of a crumbling, gothic building in Edinburgh, Detective Chief Inspector Karen Pirie is faced with the unenviable task of identifying the bones.

As Karen’s investigation gathers momentum, she is drawn deeper into a world of intrigue and betrayal, spanning the dark days of the Balkan Wars. Karen’s search for answers brings her to a small village in Croatia, a place scarred by fear, where people have endured unspeakable acts of violence.

Meanwhile, someone is taking the law into their own hands in the name of justice and revenge, but when present resentment collides with secrets of the past, the truth is more shocking than anyone could have imagined . . .

Atmospheric, spine-chilling and brimming with intrigue and suspense, this is Val McDermid’s richest and most accomplished psychological thriller to date.

About the Author

ValVal McDermid is a No. 1 bestseller whose novels have been translated into more than thirty languages, and have sold over eleven million copies. She has won many awards internationally, including the CWA Gold Dagger for best crime novel of the year and the LA Times Book of the Year Award. She was inducted into the ITV3 Crime Thriller Awards Hall of Fame in 2009 and was the recipient of the CWA Cartier Diamond Dagger for 2010. In 2011 she received the Lambda Literary Foundation Pioneer Award. She writes full time and divides her time between Cheshire and Edinburgh.

Grab a copy of The Skeleton Road here

Megan Amram, author of Science…for Her!, answers Ten Terrifying Questions

The Booktopia Book Guru asks

Megan Amram

author of Science…for Her!

Ten Terrifying Questions
____________

1. To begin with why don’t you tell us a little bit about yourself – where were you born? Raised? Schooled?

I was born in Portland, Oregon, United States. Like most Americans, I don’t know any other countries. Is Australia in Florida? I was raised in Portland and schooled at Harvard University, where I provided diversity by being one of the only dumb people there. I once worked as a clothes folder at my local mall, and it’s still my favorite job of all time.

2. What did you want to be when you were twelve, eighteen and thirty? And why?

When I was 12 I wanted to be an actress or a pharmacologist. When I was 18 I wanted to be a comedy writer or filmmaker. I’m only 27 so I cannot even IMAGINE what I’d be at 30. Dead, right? That’s SOOOOO OLD!!!

3. What strongly held belief did you have at eighteen that you do not have now?

That I would be dead of old age at 21. Now I’m just an old 27 year old old woman. Everything hurts all the time. Oh God. I’m SOOOOOO OLD!!!

4. What were three big events – in the family circle or on the world stage or in your reading life, for example – you can now say, had a great effect on you and influenced you in your career path?

The three Toy Stories. They affected me greatly, mostly because now I know that toys come alive when you leave the room. Those Toy Stories are such incredible documentaries!

5. Considering the innumerable electronic media avenues open to you – blogs, online newspapers, TV, radio, etc – why have you chosen to write a book? aren’t they obsolete?

As I state in my book, trees create unrealistic expectations for a woman’s body. We will never be as tall and thin as trees! That’s why I want to kill as many trees as possible. Writing a book is a great way to kill trees!

6. Please tell us about your latest book…

My book Science…for Her! helps women understand science by putting it into their comfort zone (a women’s magazine.) Everyone knows: women’s brains aren’t constructed to understand scientific concepts, and women’s hands aren’t constructed to turn the heavy covers of most textbooks. That’s why I created a fun, flirty, lightweight book for women of all sizes! Except plus sizes!

Grab a copy of Megan’s latest book Science…for Her! here

7. If your work could change one thing in this world – what would it be?

I want all women to know that methamphetamine is a GREAT way to lose weight!

8. Whom do you most admire and why?

Hello Kitty, because she doesn’t have a mouth.

9. Many artists set themselves very ambitious goals. What are yours?

I would like to get down to my birth weight. 

10. What advice do you give aspiring writers?

Write all you can! Writers only discover their voices through producing a ton of work. Even if you think it’s bad or juvenile, keep at it and let people read your work. Great advice, me! Alright, that will be one thousand US dollars, please! Just write my name on the bills and drop them in a mailbox, I’m sure they’ll make it to me somehow!

Megan, thank you for playing.

Grab a copy of Megan’s latest book Science…for Her! here


Science…for Her!

by Megan Amram

Megan Amram, one of Forbes’ “30 Under 30 in Hollywood & Entertainment,” Rolling Stone’s “25 Funniest People on Twitter,” and a writer for NBC’s hit show Parks and Recreation, delivers an addictively hilarious science “textbook”—tailored to the special needs of the fairer sex.

Comedy writer and Twitter sensation Megan Amram showcases her mordant wit and gift for parody in Science…For Her!, a laugh-until-you-can’t-breathe, faux-expert compendium of scientific knowledge that Megan believes is absolutely vital for the female population. Part hilarious farce, part biting gender commentary, Amram blends science and Cosmo to highlight the absurd way in which women are still portrayed in both arenas. Operating under the conceit that “science is hard enough for most people, let alone women,” Amram tackles crucial scientific topics like Biology: This Spring’s Ten Most Glamorous Ways to Die (“Choke to death on a latte”); Chemistry: Periodic Table Settings (“one of the most important building blocks of chemistry. But boy does it look drab!”); Earth Science: Fashion Staples for Each Step of Global Warming; Space and Technology: Tips for Hosting Your Own Big Bang; and the most pressing issue facing women today: kale!

Combining the off-beat humor of Amy Sedaris, the mock-expertise of John Hodgman, and a sly, clever design, Science…For Her! is a satirical gem of the gender stereotypes in the world of science, glossy magazine culture, and society in general.

About the Author

Megan Amram is a writer for the NBC comedy Parks and Recreation. Since she graduated from Harvard in 2010, she has amassed over 400,000 Twitter followers who enjoy her hilarious brand of off-beat humor. Her writing has appeared in McSweeney’s, Vulture, and The Awl, among others. Her viral video “Birth Control on the Bottom” prompted Jezebel to call her a “national treasure”. She lives in Los Angeles.

Grab a copy of Megan’s latest book Science…for Her! here

Samantha Verant, author of Seven Letters from Paris, answers Ten Terrifying Questions

The Booktopia Book Guru asks

Samantha Verant

author of Seven Letters from Paris

Ten Terrifying Questions
____________

1. To begin with why don’t you tell us a little bit about yourself – where were you born? Raised? Schooled?

I was born in Los Angeles at UCLA hospital in October of 1969, and I led the quintessential beach baby lifestyle…until my biological father drove off into the California sunset, leaving my mom and me in the sand. (Where are those tiny violins when I need them?) After spending some time with the grandparents at Eglin Air Force Base in Florida, mom and I packed up our bags and headed to Chicago in 1972. In 1975, my mom married Tony, the only father (and best dad in the world) I’ve ever known. He formally adopted me at the age of ten, shortly before the birth of my sister, Jessica.

A classically trained mezzo-soprano, in 1985 I attended The Chicago Academy for the Performing and Visual Arts, choosing theater as my major. In 1986, because of my father’s rising career in the world of advertising, our family moved to Boston and two years later to London. Along with these moves, my interests and dreams metamorphosed and art became a big part of my life. I traded in arias and monologues for advertising design, graduating cum laude from Syracuse University, and moved back to Chicago.

2. What did you want to be when you were twelve, eighteen and thirty? And why?

I suppose I’ve always been a creative type – a bit of a renaissance woman who believes in self-expression, but without the tattoos. I’m terrified of needles. At the age of twelve, I wanted to be singer or an actress, or maybe a dancer. And I wanted to be Nadia Comaneci, the gymnast. (This last career option was cut short when I tried to back-flip off a mailbox and broke my arm). At the age of eighteen, I wanted to be an artist. And at the age of thirty, I was a graphic designer. It wasn’t until my late thirties I discovered a love for the written word, a place where I could express myself by singing with my voice, acting out scenes, and designing worlds all on a blank page. I’m surprised the writing bug didn’t bite me sooner, considering I’ve been a book omnivore since the age of three. Note: I was an early reader not an actual book eater.

3. What strongly held belief did you have at eighteen that you do not have now?

Author: Samantha Verant

Like most eighteen-year-olds, I thought I knew everything about everything. As I grew older, I realized I didn’t have the world figured out. At all. In fact, I’m always learning something new. (Currently, the French language and all those dreaded conjugations keep me busy). Although I try to keep the spirit of my inner-eighteen-year-old alive and kicking, I now know that life is about figuring things out one day at a time and that there are no short cuts.

4. What were three big events – in the family circle or on the world stage or in your reading life, for example – you can now say, had a great effect on you and influenced you in your career path?

I’ve traveled the world, lived in many places, and worked many jobs. I’ve been married and I’ve been divorced. I’ve had many successes and more than a few failures— always on the search for the one thing that truly excited me. Then, one day, I finally found everything I’d been looking for: a passion for the written word and true love. Writing not only enabled me to open my heart, it led me to southwestern France, where I’m now married to a sexy French rocket scientist I met over twenty years ago. The above has definitely impacted my life and has opened up a new and exciting career path to me. With two books out on the market, I can now proudly say ‘I’m a writer’ without an affected accent. Damn straight. I’m proud.

5. Considering the innumerable electronic media avenues open to you – blogs, online newspapers, TV, radio, etc – why have you chosen to write a book? Aren’t they obsolete?

What! Say it ain’t so! Books will never be obsolete! Books shape our lives, challenging us to learn and to think. They transport us and open us to new worlds and ideas. The electronic media avenues support books, not vice versa. I chose to write Seven Letters from Paris because I believe it delivers a message of hope. But to get to that message, I needed a beginning, a middle, and an ending– to tell the whole story. And writing this memoir allowed me to do just that. I’m more than happy to talk about my book on TV or on the radio. And, like any writer, I’d love to see Seven Letters from Paris: The Movie. So if there are any interested parties out there, you can find my contact info on my blog. Can I insert a Dr. Evil laugh here? mwa-ha-ha.

6. Please tell us about your latest book…

Seven Letters from Paris is the true “second chance” story of how I restarted my life and rebooted my heart.

Five years ago, I was on the cusp of turning forty…and a woman on the verge of a potential nervous breakdown. The recent victim of a company wide lay-off, I owed over twenty thousand dollars on three different Visas with no hopes to pay it off. Anger and resentment had taken its toll on what started out as a happy marriage. For eight years, I’d been sharing the guest bedroom with my black Labrador retriever, Ike. I didn’t have actual kids, save for my furry replacement child.

Instead of spinning my wheels on the corner of misery and despair all alone, I met up with my best friend of twenty-something years, Tracey. Over a bottle of pinot noir, our conversation changed from my imminent divorce to happier times, specifically our 1989 trip to Paris. Tracey pitched me an idea: we were going to create a love blog using the seven old love letters I’d received from Jean-Luc, the sexy French rocket scientist I’d met at a café when I was nineteen.

Intrigued by her idea (and looking for an ounce of hope), I pulled Jean-Luc’s letters out of their plastic storage container that very same night. Instead of hope, I found regret. I began questioning things like: why didn’t I have children? Did I really have issues with men because my biological father deserted my mother and me? If Jean-Luc was so special, why did I dump him at a train platform and never answer even one of his seven heartfelt letters? And, more importantly, why did I hang on to his letters?

A realization hit: I’d been so afraid of falling in love I’d never truly done it.

I knew, in order for me to move on and live out the happy life I desperately wanted, I needed to deal with these questions from my past — one regret/problem at a time, starting with the easiest one first. Thanks to Google, it was easy to find Jean-Luc and I got off to a quick start.

When I sent off my two-decade-delayed apology, I thought I was only looking for forgiveness. I wound up getting a lot more than that. One email led to another, and I was able to do something I hadn’t been able to do in the past: I opened up my heart— online. I also found the courage to change everything in my life.

HEA. All the way!

Grab a copy of Samantha’s book Seven Letters from Paris here

7. If your work could change one thing in this world – what would it be?

People need to open up their hearts, to dare to live and to love big, and to not be afraid to fail along the way. I think many people in this crazy world of ours are terrified of change and taking risks, so I’d like to see that change. We only have one life. It’s up to us to take accountability for our happiness.

8. Whom do you most admire and why?

This is going to be a clichéd/canned answer: my mother. She amazes me. I mean, how many women on this planet can say that one of their best friends is their mom? Well, mine is. In fact, she is my best friend. This is not to say we’ve never had our issues. I was a sixteen-year-old once. And she can have her “opinions,” whether I want to hear them or not. But my mom and I grew up together. At the young age of twenty-one, she gave birth to little me and was forced to put her dreams aside. Instead of being bitter, she always surrounded me with love and unwavering support, pushing me to be the best person I could be. Not many people are content living vicariously through somebody else. My mom was…and is. Seven Letter from Paris is not just a story about rekindling a romance with a sexy Frenchman; it’s also a love letter to my mom. Yes, she’s read the book. And, yes, it made her cry– happy tears, of course!

9. Many people set themselves very ambitious goals. What are yours?

Here we go. The cat is about to be let out of the proverbial bag. I’m a genre jumper. Not many writers have romantic memoirs and middle grade books about mutant kids coming out at the same time. (I thought about using a pen name for the MG, but why bother? The truth? It always comes out). With that said, I’d love to write memoir book two, continue writing middle grade, and explore all of my passion projects, one, of which, is a historical fiction/magical realism concept about wine. So, yes, I want to be a successful genre jumper and not hide behind a pen name. Wish me luck?

10. What advice do you give aspiring writers?

Oh, boy! I have a lot of advice. Work on your craft. Connect with other writers. Build up your platform, your social connections. No matter how supportive she is– your mother is NOT a critique partner or a beta reader! And neither is your sister, spouse, or best friend. Put your work out there. Yes, with strangers. Remember that publishing is subjective. Don’t be afraid of rejection. Learn the business of publishing. Never pitch your work as the next big seller. Take critiques with an open mind and don’t get angry. Your writing partners want the best for you. When critiquing others, go for the sugar, salt, sugar method. (What’s good about the story, what needs to be worked on, and what totally rocks). Kill your darlings. (There will be things you think are awesome or funny, but others, simply put, will not). If you’re writing a memoir, hire an editor to work with you on the manuscript before you pitch it to agents and/or publishers. You will need an objective eye. Celebrate your victories…and your defeats. You’re one step closer. Forgive typos; they happen to everybody. Roll up your sleeves, prepare to get dirty, and work hard. Don’t send your work off to an agent or publisher until it’s polished. Revise. Edit. Repeat. Be patient. When you can’t stand to look at your manuscript anymore…it’s ready.

Even if you have to shelve your first manuscript, or the second, no matter how amazing you think it is, don’t let it get you down. The great thing about writing is you can always dust yourself off and turn the page. Write another book. Revise. Edit. Repeat. This business takes guts. Are you ready to earn your racing stripes?

It took me seven years (there’s my number) to get where I am today, meaning two books under my belt. My publishing journey wasn’t easy and there were no short cuts. (Some people get lucky! We will lynch them later.) Alas, the most important advice I can give is: Never give up! It takes an extraordinary amount of courage to put yourself out there. If you really want to be a writer, you can do it.

Sometimes I call myself Seabiscuit. Thankfully, I found the right people who believed in me and pushed me forward. Now that I’ve been trained by the best, it’s off to the races. If I fall down, I’ll just dust off my knees and get back up. Giddy-up.

Samantha, thank you for playing.

 Grab a copy of Seven Letters from Paris here


Seven Letters from Paris

by Samantha Verant

In the best romantic tradition of Almost French, a woman falls madly in love with a Frenchman in Paris, but with a twist. It takes her twenty years to find him again …

Samantha’s life is falling apart – she’s lost her job, her marriage is on the rocks and she’s walking dogs to keep the wolf from the door.

When she stumbles across seven love letters from the handsome Frenchman she fell head over heels for in Paris when she was 19, she can’t help but wonder, what if?

One carefully worded, very belated email apology, it’s clear that sometimes love does give you a second chance.

Jetting off to France to reconnect with a man you knew for just one day is crazy – but it’s the kind of crazy Samantha’s been waiting for her whole life.

Truth may be stranger than fiction but sometimes it’s better than your wildest dreams.

Deliciously funny, honest and beyond romantic, Seven Letters is the perfect feel-good gift for any woman with a heartbeat.

 Grab a copy of Seven Letters from Paris here

Elizabeth Farrelly, author of Caro Was Here, answers Ten Terrifying Questions

The Booktopia Book Guru asks

Elizabeth Farrelly

author of Caro Was Here

Ten Terrifying Questions
____________

1. To begin with why don’t you tell us a little bit about yourself – where were you born? Raised? Schooled?

I was born in Dunedin, in the cold and romantic South Island of New Zealand, but grew up mostly in Auckland, the only city I know that sits on 48 volcanic cones. We lived in leafy suburbia and walked or cycled to the local primary and grammar schools. There was lots of nature stuff – sailing and rowing and fishing and (what Kiwis call) tramping. To grow up in suburbia, then, meant barefoot after-school rampaging through the back hedges and churchyards and empty lots until well after dark. So for an avid reader of myths, legends and adventure stories, there was endless opportunity for the entanglement of
imagination and landscape. Much of this comes out in Caro Was Here.

2. What did you want to be when you were twelve, eighteen and thirty? And why?

At twelve I wanted to be an air hostie. I vividly recall wanting to wear lots of aquamarine eye shadow and travel the world serving drinks on elegant trays. At eighteen I wanted to be a doctor and save the world’s children from terrible
disease. At thirty I gave in and became a writer, because story sits at the heart of everything. Story is what I love.

3. What strongly held belief did you have at eighteen that you do not have now?

Author: Elizabeth Farrelly

I believed all you need to change the world was the yearning to do it and the belief that you could. Then I worked out it was a little bit harder than that. Just a little bit.

4. What were three works of art – book or painting or piece of music, etc – you can now say, had a great effect on you and influenced your own development as a writer?

This is interesting. I see all my nominations are plays. Hmm. TS Eliot’s Murder in the Cathedral affected me profoundly as a teenager, when we studied it at school. I loved the intense play of good and evil, the way the rhythms and imagery resonated with the action, and the sense of a deeply shadowed history. Eliot made me love literature.

When I saw Arthur Miller’s The Crucible performed in London inside the amazing Hawksmoor church at Spitalfields, I wept uncontrollably – hugely uncharacteristic – for an hour. Not because it was sad, but because of the hypocrisy and deceit won over truth, and the way the production realised this conflict inside Hawksmoor’s amazing space, using the cruciform plan to dramatise the tensions.

Shakespeare is kind of obvious but, at school, I didn’t like Shakespeare at all. Yet when I saw King Lear performed by the Royal Shakespeare Company at the Barbican in London, I was moved beyond words. It was that last scene, where Cordelia dies. It all comes home to Lear, just what terrible terrible damage he has done. It is heartbreaking and beautiful.

5. Considering the innumerable artistic avenues open to you, why did you choose to write a novel?

Anyone who has written one will tell you that writing a novel is less about choosing to write it than losing the fight of resistance! It is so tempting because a novel is the most satisfying form of story. A novel is a world you can inhabit. Even when you’re not actually reading the book, a part of your mind can still dwell there, enjoying the mysteries of place and unexpected twists of character. A novel gives time for change. It allows character to develop, power
relationships to reverse and familiar assumptions to change beyond recognition. A novel takes you on a strange and unexpected journey, like a river-cave ride. It is the ultimate adventure. Novels are cool.

6. Please tell us about your latest novel…

Caro Was Here is a story about naughtiness and freedom, about trust and betrayal, about courage and the cost of courage. I wanted to write a story that captured the magic with which a child sees the world, the real world in particular. I wanted to set the story in Sydney, which I think is breathtakingly beautiful and somewhat under-written, if you’ll forgive the awkward phrase. And I wanted to write an adventure story with a purposeful plot and a girl in the lead; a story where a girl must draw on all her courage and strength and, in the end, intelligence, just to survive.

Grab a copy of Elizabeth’s latest novel Caro Was Here here

7. What do you hope people take away with them after reading your work?

I hope they will be able to imagine Caro’s island birthday so vividly they can smell it. I hope they remember the emotions – the fear, the thrill, the laughter. I hope they love the characters and want to hear more. I hope they pass the book and the story on to friends.

8. Whom do you most admire in the realm of writing and why?

I read crime. I love crime writers that give depth of character, quirky humour, gorgeous sentence structure and a vivid sense of place. So I love James Lee Burke, James Ellroy, Hilary Mantel, Elmore Leonard and Don Winslow. But when it comes to children’s fiction I love things with vivid word rhythm, intense imagery and conflict: Margaret Mahy (The Man Whose Mother Was a Pirate), Roald Dahl (The Witches), Maurice Sendak (Where the Wild Things Are) and Banjo Paterson (The Man from Iron Bark).

9. Many artists set themselves very ambitious goals. What are yours?

My ambition is that each of my books should be better and more satisfying than the one before it.  I want to become a better writer.

10. What advice do you give aspiring writers?

I want to write stories and keep on writing stories that people love to read. What could be better?

Elizabeth, thank you for playing.

Grab a copy of Caro Was Here here


Caro Was Here

by Elizabeth Farrelly

The bestselling novelist of all time.

The world’s most famous detective.

The literary event of the year.

Since the publication of her first novel in 1920, more than two billion copies of Agatha Christie’s novels have been sold around the world. Now, for the first time ever, the guardians of her legacy have approved a brand-new novel featuring Dame Agatha’s most beloved creation, Hercule Poirot.

In the hands of internationally bestselling author Sophie Hannah, Poirot plunges into a mystery set in 1920s London – a diabolically clever puzzle sure to baffle and delight both Christie’s fans as well as readers who have not yet read her work. Written with the full backing of Christie’s family, and featuring the most iconic detective of all time, this new novel is a major event for mystery lovers the world over.

 Grab a copy of Caro Was Here here

Stephanie Alexander, author of The Cook’s Companion, answers Six Sharp Questions

The Booktopia Book Guru asks

Stephanie Alexander

author of The Cook’s Companion

Six Sharp Questions
___________

1. Congratulations, you have a new book. What is it about and what does it mean to you?

Not a new book at all but a thorough revision of my classic and very successful The Cook’s Companion.

2. Times pass. Things change. What are the best and worst moments that you have experienced in the past year or so?

I have moved house which went from being the worst possible experience to go through to the best decision I have made. I also embraced digital technology and worked with a great team to convert the full text of The Cook’s Companion to a marvellous app.

3. Do you have a favourite quote or passage you would be happy to share with us? It doesn’t need to be deep but it would be great if it meant something to you.

My dad said to me! ‘ nothing or nobody is as good or as bad as they first appear’. Interesting observation but not very profound but for some reason it has stuck in my head.

Stephanie-Alexander

Author: Stephanie Alexander

4. Writers have often been described as being difficult to live with. Do you conform to the stereotype or defy it? Please tell us a little about the day to day of your writing life.

Live alone so only have to cope with myself although that is not always easy. I write best early in morning and for long stretches in the weekends.

5. Some writers claim not to be influenced by the needs of the marketplace, while others seem obsessed by it. Would you please describe how the marketplace affects your writing (come on, tell the truth!).

I have been writing about food and produce and the power of the shared table for more than 35 years. Seem to have influenced the marketplace actually as the food media has just gone on expanding as have cookbooks.

6. Unlikely Scenario: You’ve been charged with civilising twenty ill-educated adolescents but you may take only a few books with you. What do you take and why?

The cook’s Companion volume, and also the Cook’s Companion App and get them all cooking.

Stephanie, thank you for playing.

Grab a copy of The Cook’s Companion here


9781920989002The Cook’s Companion

by Stephanie Alexander

The Cook’s Companion has established itself as the kitchen ‘bible’ in over 500,000 homes since it was first published in 1996.

This 2014 revision includes two major new chapters, two expanded chapters, 70 new recipes and a complete revision of the text to reflect changes in the marketplace and new regulations. Stephanie believes that good food is essential to living well: her book is for everyone, every day. She has invaluable information about ingredients, cooking techniques and kitchen equipment, along with inspiration, advice and encouragement and close to 1000 failsafe recipes.

About the Author

For 21 years from 1976, Stephanie Alexander was the force behind Stephanie’s restaurant in Hawthorn, a landmark establishment credited with having revolutionised fine dining in Melbourne. From 1997 to 2005 Stephanie, along with several friends, ran the Richmond Hill Café and Larder, a neighbourhood restaurant renowned for its specialist cheese retailing. In her recently published memoir, A Cook’s Life, she recounts how her uncompromising dedication to good food has shaped her life and changed the eating habits of a nation.

One of Australia’s most highly acclaimed food authors, Stephanie has written fourteen books, including Stephanie’s Menus for Food Lovers, Stephanie’s Seasons and Stephanie Alexander & Maggie Beer’s Tuscan Cookbook (co-author). Her signature publication, The Cook’s Companion, has established itself as the kitchen bible in over 400 000 homes. With characteristic determination, Stephanie initiated the Kitchen Garden at Collingwood College in order to allow young children to experience the very things that made her own childhood so rich: the growing, harvesting, cooking and sharing of good food.

Grab a copy of The Cook’s Companion here

 

Nine Naughty Questions with… Jennifer St George, author of Tempted by the Billionaire Tycoon.

tempted-by-the-billionaire-tycoonThe Booktopia Book Guru asks

 Jennifer St George

author of Tempted by the Billionaire Tycoon

Nine Naughty Questions

———————————-

1. I wonder, is a romance writer born or made? Please tell us a little about your life before publication.

I suppose they could be both, but I was certainly a romance writer that was made. Before taking up a creative pen, I spent twenty years in corporate marketing and management consulting roles.  Some career highlights include launching Guinness beer in Russia; reaching 40 million people through a publicity campaign that ‘gave away’ a pub in Ireland and launching the Ford Ka brand in Australia. It took determination and hard work to transform from a business executive to a published romance author. Having said that, I’d always loved reading and books, which is a good start for any writer.

2. For all the glitz and the glam associated with the idea of romance novels, writing about and from the heart is personal and very revealing. Do you think this is why romance readers are such devoted fans? And do you ever feel exposed?

I don’t know about exposed, but I do become quite emotional while writing my stories.  Often while drafting the ‘black moment’, when all seems lost, I’m crying my eyes out. Other times I feel completely exhausted after writing a scene. I put my characters through hell and I can’t help feeling their pain (and their joy of course!)

00000069873. Please tell us about your latest novel…

A series of strange accidents are occurring at Sirona, a luxury spa resort in the picturesque English countryside. Billionaire owner Nic Capitini wants the person responsible sacked. But the law requires he give three official warnings. Nic checks in undercover to gather the evidence he needs, and when he arrives to find his general manager, Poppy Bradford enjoying the spa’s facilities, he doesn’t think it will prove very challenging.

But, it isn’t long before Nic realises that not only is Poppy beautiful, she’s a brilliant manager and the chemistry between them is undeniable. When Poppy herself is threatened, it seems clear the incidents are part of a systematic campaign of sabotage. Even though he believes she’s innocent, Nic knows Poppy is hiding something. But will learning her secret mean losing her forever?

Grab a copy of Jennifers’s novel Tempted by the Billionaire Tycoon here

4. Is the life of a published Romance writer… well… Romantic?

I like to think so. I knew I was up for a lifetime of romance when my now husband flew across the world (I lived in London, he lived in Brisbane) to declare his undying love after only knowing me for three weeks.

Everyday romance-writing life however, it a lot of hard work and copious amounts of coffee! But, I do try to visit the locations I set my stories. Tempted by the Billionaire Tycoon (my latest story) is set in Paris, Versailles and the Lake District (UK). I travelled to all these places to ensure I captured the essence of each location. A nice job perk!

the-billionaire-s-pursuit-of-love5. Of all of the Romantic moments in your life is there one moment, more dear than all the rest, against which you judge all the Romantic elements in your writing? If so can you tell us about that special moment?

My husband’s international dash outlined above is pretty hard to top, so yes, my heroes have to work pretty hard as I have very high romantic standards.

6. Sex in Romance writing today ranges from ‘I can’t believe they’re allowed to publish this stuff’ explicit to ‘turn the light back on I can see something’ mild. How important do you think sex is in a romance novel?

I write sexy category romance stories in glamorous international settings, so sex is a vital ingredient in all my novels. But, I think building the sexual tension in the story is critical to delivering an emotional and engaging read.

isbn97818440803807. Romance writers are often Romance readers – please tell us your five favourite (read and re-read) romance novels or five novels that influenced your work most?

1. Rebecca – Daphne du Maurier
2. Pride and Prejudice -  Jane Austen (I recently visited her house in Hampshire where she wrote the book…fascinating)
3, 4 and 5. Anything by category romance authors, Kelly Hunter, Rachel Bailey and Amy Andrews (I could go on and on and on)

8. Erotic Romance writing is ‘so hot right now’, do you have any thoughts on why?

I have to admit it is not really a genre I read, but I suspect it is a great way to escape into a fantasy world that whips reader away from the every day. There’s something pretty exciting about having a hot werewolf imprint on you or a vampire bite you so you live forever!

9. Lastly, what advice do you give aspiring writers?

Read and learn (and never stop) and write, write, write.

Once I decided I wanted to be a romance writer, I voraciously read the types of books I wanted to write.  I wanted to understand readers’ expectations. I travelled all over Australia to attend the best romance writing courses and I didn’t let rejection stop me. I kept writing until I got that call.  Also, I’d recommend joining Romance Writers of Australia…it will save you years of wandering around in the romance-writing wilderness!

Thanks for joining us Jennifer!


tempted-by-the-billionaire-tycoonTempted by the Billionaire Tycoon

by Jennifer St George

The latest sexy international romance from the bestselling author of The Billionaire’s Pursuit of Love.

Three strikes and you’re out…

A series of strange accidents are occurring at Sirona, a luxury spa resort in the picturesque English countryside. Billionaire owner Nic Capitini wants the person responsible sacked. But the law requires he give three official warnings. Nic checks in undercover to gather the evidence he needs, and when he arrives to find his general manager enjoying the spa’s facilities, he doesn’t think it will prove very challenging.

Despite first impressions, it isn’t long before Nic realises that not only is Poppy Bradford beautiful, she’s a brilliant manager who runs the resort superbly. And the chemistry between them is undeniable. When Poppy herself is threatened, it seems clear the incidents are part of a systematic campaign of sabotage. Even though he believes she’s innocent, Nic knows Poppy is hiding something. But will learning her secret mean losing her forever?

Tempted by the Billionaire Tycoon is part of the Billionaire series by Jennifer St George, but can certainly be enjoyed as a stand-alone book.

Grab a copy of Jennifers’s novel Tempted by the Billionaire Tycoon here

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