EXCLUSIVE INTERVIEW: Michael Robotham, award-winning author of Life or Death, chats to Andrew Cattanach

There seems to be two types of people in this world. Those who love Michael Robotham, and those who haven’t heard of him yet.

Life or Death is for the crime fan who likes a story, not just an account. Brilliantly written, intelligent, funny, sad and meticulously mapped out, it’s easy to understand why there has already been so much interest in a big screen adaptation of the novel.

There is nothing more exciting than an author operating at the peak of their powers. With Life or Death, Robotham is doing just that, further strengthening his hold as one of Australia’s finest crime writers. Find out why Audie is on the run, before it’s too late.

Grab a copy of Life or Death here

Grab a copy of Life or Death here

Steve Lewis and Chris Uhlmann, authors of The Marmalade Files and The Mandarin Code, chat to John Purcell

After the runaway success of The Marmalade Files, it was inevitable that Steve Lewis and Chris Uhlmann would be returning for another healthy dose of political intrigue.

They chat to John Purcell about their latest book The Mandarin Code, the difficulties of co-writing, and how life in Canberra can often be stranger than fiction.

Grab a copy of The Mandarin Code here

Grab a copy of The Mandarin Code here

The Mandarin Code

by Steve Lewis and Chris Uhlmann

A body pulled from the murky waters of Lake Burley Griffin links Canberra, Beijing and Washington in a titanic struggle where war is just a mouse click away. Veteran reporter Harry Dunkley is chasing the scoop of his career, hunting for his best friend’s killer. Navigating treacherous political waters where a desperate minority government edges ever closer to disaster, he delves into a cyber world where there are no secrets.

Friendship and loyalty give way to betrayal and revenge as Dunkley stumbles into the sights of the mandarins who wield real power – and who’ll stop at nothing to retain it. Political insiders Steve Lewis and Chris Uhlmann bring biting wit and behind-the-headlines insights to this sharply observed sequel to the bestselling The Marmalade Files, once again lifting the veil on the lust and lies that stain the corridors of power.

Grab a copy of The Mandarin Code here

What Cathryn Read – The July Round Up (by bestselling author Cathryn Hein)

Popular Australian novelist Cathryn Hein, author of Rocking Horse Hill, Heartland and more gives her verdict on the books she’s been reading.

Regency-set intrigue and determined rakes, a classic adventure, some sexy magic and mystery, wallbanging and a hot Scot in a kilt. My July reads were as romantic as they come.


Son of the Morning

by Linda Howard

When Australian historical romance author Anna Campbell (A Rake’s Midnight Kiss) described this book as “out Da Vinci-ing The Da Vinci Code” I had to give it a run. And what fun I had, too. Loads of action, an unusual romance with a hot Scot, Templar treasure, deadly danger, time travel and a good dose of sex for extra spice.

Scholar Grace St John finds her life destroyed when she begins translating an ancient Templar document. Forced on the run, with the police and a terrible enemy after her, she manages to survive on her wits and friendship. As Grace eludes her hunters she continues her translation, uncovering a secret force and the warrior bound to protect it forever. To save herself, and the world, from evil she must travel back in time. And face the raw passion and power of Black Niall.

Romance, adventure and men in kilts. You can’t go wrong!

Grab a copy of Son of the Morning here


The Winter Bride

by Anne Gracie

Oh, how I adore this series! It started with The Autumn Bride, which was absolutely gorgeous and I thought couldn’t be bested… until I read The Winter Bride. Loved it. Like really, really loved it, to the point that this is now my favourite Anne Gracie.

The Winter Bride continues the story of the Chance Sisters, this time focusing on Damaris Chance and muffin-fearing (yes, you read that right), steadfast rake Freddie Monkton-Coombes. For their own reasons, both have sworn off marriage, but when circumstances call for a fake betrothal, Freddie and Damaris are thrown together. All goes well. Too well, in fact. Which leads Freddie into thinking that this muffin caper isn’t so frightening after all. But can he convince Damaris of the same?

Not only was this story an absolute delight with it’s cute muffin theme, it was also hugely emotional. Freddie’s and Damaris’s backstories left me in tears, the poor darlings, but also cheering madly for their happily-ever-after. An absolute delight. Go buy it. You’ll have a ball…

 Grab a copy of The Winter Bride here


Wallbanger

by Alice Clayton

I admit that I was reluctant to read this book but fellow author Rachael Johns (Outback Blaze) remained adamant that it was brilliant. With nearly 80,000 Goodreads ratings indicating the same, I figured I’d better see what the fuss was about. About 10% through I sent Rach a cranky email along the lines of “I told you this wasn’t my thing!” but she insisted I read on. The story picked up. Then it really started romping and next thing I know I was having a fantastic time.

Olivia has lost her O. Simon, her hot neighbour, definitely hasn’t. When Simon’s over-active sex life leads to a hallway confrontation, attraction smacks them both in the face. But with Olivia loving her single life (even if she is missing her O) and Simon busy with his harem, romance is out of the question. Friendship, however, blossoms and it’s the growth of this friendship that makes this book so wonderful. That and super snappy dialogue, naughty cat antics, friends in messed-up relationships, and some tasty baking as an added bonus. And wallbanging. Mustn’t forget that!

Humorous and heart-warming. Yep, Rach and all those Goodreads ratings were spot on. A hugely enjoyable contemporary romance that’ll leave you smiling.

  Grab a copy of Wallbanger here


City of Lost Dreams

by Magnus Flyte

The first in this series, City of Dark Magic, was a blast of a read. Sexy, funny, full of adventure and history, with a bit of the paranormal thrown in to liven things up. The second, City of Lost Dreams, is the same, albeit with a more complex storyline. But the same unique characters I fell in love with are back, and in a nice pickle too.

Musicologist Sarah Weston is in Vienna looking for a cure for her dangerously ill young friend Pollina. When the scientist who could cure Pollina suddenly disappears, apparently on the run, Sarah is forced to help her. But mysterious things begin to happen, to Sarah and those she comes in contact with. Meanwhile, Prince Max is in Prague, investigating the sudden re-appearance of people long dead, while Nicholas Pertusato is on his own mission, chasing fast-disappearing alchemist’s relics. When they realise the connections, the trio discover it might not be only Pollina’s life under threat.

This sequel was wonderfully entertaining. Great pacing, lots of intrigue, fabulous atmosphere, sexy and fun. Can’t wait for the next.

Grab a copy of City of Dreams here


King Solomon’s Mines

by H. Rider Haggard

I’ve been meaning to read this book for donkey’s. Now I wish I had before because I’d probably be on my second or third read now. What a hoot! Except for the elephant shooting. Can’t say I appreciated that at all, but those were the times, sadly. The rest was a great fat adventure with plenty of drama and heroism and brilliant characters. Alan Quatermain was much more subtle and interesting than his Hollywood hero, Sir Henry had me in tears with his heroics, Captain Good and his lovely white legs provided comic relief, Umpoba was brilliantly regal, King Twala twisted by violence and corruption, his witch Gagool perfectly evil, while the Kukuana warriors were magnificent, courageous and fierce. What amazed me the most was how King Solomon’s Mines read. I’d expected a bit of a slog given it was published in 1885, but it romped along like a modern boy’s own adventure.

  Grab a copy of King Solomon’s Mines here

 


A Dangerous Madness

by Michelle Diener

I’m not afraid to admit I’m a total Michelle Diener fangirl. I could rave for hours about her Susanna Horenbout & John Parker series. They’re like reading Tudor-set James Bonds, full of action, intrigue and a delicious romance. A Dangerous Madness is set in the ever-popular Regency era and while it’s connected to previous novels The Emperor’s Conspiracy and A Banquet of Lies (both brilliant), it can be easily read alone.

When Phoebe Hillier is jilted by her fool of a betrothed, instead of despair, she’s rather relieved. Until she discovers Sheldrake had been involved in something unsavoury. Something that places her in grave danger. Enter the Duke of Wittaker, on his own investigation of a plot against the Prime Minister. When it leads him to Phoebe sparks fly. But who can be trusted during these dangerous times? Especially when they’ve both been living lies.

In all Diener’s books, the pacing of both the thriller plot and romance is superb. I also adore her characters. They’re courageous, clever, interesting and possess great integrity. But I really love how she brings the politics of the period to life, whether that be in the court of Henry VIII or the Regency era. The author notes at the end of the book also make for fascinating reading. Highly recommended.

  Grab a copy of A Dangerous Madness here

 


Hein, CathrynThanks Cathryn Hein, we look forward to seeing what you have read next month!

Cathryn Hein was born in South Australia’s rural south-east. With three generations of jockeys in the family it was little wonder she grew up horse mad, finally obtaining her first horse at age 10. So began years of pony club, eventing, dressage and showjumping until university beckoned.

Armed with a shiny Bachelor of Applied Science (Agriculture) from Roseworthy College she moved to Melbourne and later Newcastle, working in the agricultural and turf seeds industry. Her partner’s posting to France took Cathryn overseas for three years in Provence where she finally gave in to her life-long desire to write. Her short fiction has been recognised in numerous contests, and published in Woman’s Day.

Now living in Melbourne, Cathryn writes full-time.

Click here to see Cathryn’s author page

Rocking Horse Hill

by Cathryn Heinrocking-horse-hill

Who do you trust when a stranger threatens to tear your family apart?

Ever since she was a little girl, Emily Wallace-Jones has loved Rocking Horse Hill. The beautiful family property is steeped in history. Everything important in Em’s life has happened there. And even though Em’s brother Digby has inherited the property, he has promised Em it will be her home for as long as she wishes.

When Digby falls in love with sweet Felicity Townsend, a girl from the wrong side of the tracks, Em worries about the future. But she is determined not to treat Felicity with the same teenage snobbery that tore apart her relationship with her first love, Josh Sinclair. A man who has now sauntered sexily back into Em’s life and given her a chance for redemption.

But as Felicity settles in, the once tightly knitted Wallace-Jones family begins to fray. Suspicions are raised, Josh voices his distrust, and even Em’s closest friends question where Felicity’s motives lie. Conflicted but determined to make up for the damage caused by her past prejudices, Em sides with her brother and his fiancée until a near tragedy sets in motion a chain of events that will change the family forever.

Rocking Horse Hill is a moving family drama and passionate love story from the author of Heartland.

Grab a copy of Rocking Horse Hill Here

Liane Moriarty’s What Alice Forgot set to become major Hollywood film

moriartyliane01Liane Moriarty’s 2010 novel What Alice Forgot is set to be adapted into a film helmed by David Frankel, director of The Devil Wears Prada.

Shauna Cross, who wrote Whip It and the upcoming film adaptation of Gayle Forman’s If I Stay, is attached to pen the project.

The news comes a day after the release of Moriarty’s new novel Big Little Lies, which has already attracted significant buzz. Recent figures from the US indicate it is one of the most pre-ordered books of 2014. Liane will be visiting Booktopia HQ soon, so order now and you could secure a signed copy!

Order a copy of Big Little Lies from Booktopia by August 8th and you could win 1 of 3 girls night in prize packs valued at $299. Click here for more details.

big-little-liesBig Little Lies

by Liane Moriarty

Signed Copies Available While Stocks Last

‘I guess it started with the mothers.’

‘It was all just a terrible misunderstanding.’

‘I’ll tell you exactly why it happened.’

Pirriwee Public’s annual school Trivia Night has ended in a shocking riot. A parent is dead.

Liane Moriarty’s new novel is funny and heartbreaking, challenging and compassionate.

The No. 1 New York Times bestselling author turns her unique gaze on parenting and playground politics, showing us what really goes on behind closed suburban doors.

‘Let me be clear. This is not a circus. This is a murder investigation.’

 Grab a copy of Liane Moriarty’s Big Little Lies here

BOOK REVIEW: Here Come the Dogs by Omar Musa (Review by Caroline Baum)

here-come-the-dogs-order-your-signed-copy-The energy of this debut novel just leaps off the page. Musa, a charismatic rapper, has successfully translated the idiom and pulse of performance to the page with its syncopated rhythms and hard-edged beats.

Inevitably, he is being compared with his mate Christos Tsiolkas for his full-frontal engagement with contemporary Australian society: in this case, multicultural masculinity with its surges of often misdirected testosterone.

In small town suburbia during a tinder-dry summer, anything could happen. Booze, drugs, violence and a racing dog all help pass the time.

At the centre of this compelling mash up of poetry and prose are three iconic young men: Solomon, a charming Samoan, who has broken up with his girlfriend and is fascinated by Scarlett, a free spirited tattooist; his half-brother Jimmy, who has got himself into trouble, and their Macedonian childhood friend, Aleks.

Musa manipulates language with raw, bracing vitality, offering up a picture of Australia that is not pretty but feels authentic.

——————————————————-

Caroline Baum has worked as founding editor of Good Reading magazine, features editor for Vogue, presenter of ABC TV’s popular bookshow, Between the Lines, and Foxtel’s Talking Books, and as an executive producer with ABC Radio National. She is currently Booktopia’s Editorial Director.

Grab a signed copy of Here Come the Dogs here

Grab a signed copy of Here Come the Dogs here

BOOK REVIEW: The Voice by Ray Warren (Review by Andrew Cattanach)

How strange it is to know a voice so well, yet know nothing about the person behind it.

Ray Warren has been purring like a wolverine in my living room for most of my life. On the rare occasions we were allowed to watch TV during dinner, it was usually Ray’s voice emanating from that part of the room, a big game that even mum’s lamb roast couldn’t compete with. They are the strongest memories of my childhood, the fire roaring, mum and dad reading the paper, and Ray Warren musing about a bad offside call.

Sports memoirs are a tricky thing. Everyone has been burnt at one stage or another, particularly if they find themselves in the revolving door of live television. The egos are big, producers wanting talent with strong opinions or they are shown the door.

The Voice is thankfully something different. The man affectionately known as ‘Rabs’ appears nearly embarrassed that his life has garnered so much interest, initially reluctant to write in detail about himself. A few pages in and tales of a childhood spent on the railways, sports carnivals and family holidays paint a beautiful picture, and help Warren warm nicely to the task of chronicling his incredible journey.

The world’s greatest cricketer Don Bradman famously invented a childhood game, hitting a golf ball against a water tank with a cricket stump for hours on end, that would propel him to greatness. From the age of six Ray had developed a similar game to enable him to chase his own dreams. Warren would paint his marbles different colours, assign each colour a name, and fling them down the family hallway, calling the race as though it were the Melbourne Cup. He would later go on to call three cups, along with Commonwealth and Olympic Games and thousands of rugby league matches.

Warren shares his ups and reflects with great humility on his downs. Each struggle something we can all relate to, each lesson we can all absorb.

The Voice is the warm, funny and self-deprecating story of an excitable, eccentric kid who had a dream, and turned into an excitable, eccentric man who found himself living one.

Grab a signed copy of Ray Warren’s The Voice here

_______________________________________

Andrew Cattanach is a regular contributor to The Booktopia Blog. He learned to read on a two hour bus trip to school every day, and learned to write in lecture halls and cramped tutorial rooms. He sometimes wins things for the lecture hall stuff.

You can follow his ramblings on twitter at @andrew__cat

 _______________________________________

Grab a signed copy of Ray Warren’s The Voice here

REVIEW: A Thousand Shards of Glass by Michael Katakis (Review by John Purcell)

Click here for more details or to buy Thousand Shards of Glass

I loved this little book. A finished copy was recently given to me by Simon and Schuster Australia.

I get sent a lot of books but I suspect this one was chosen for me the reader not me the bookseller. Whoever thought to send it probably guessed I would love it.

Michael Katakis, who I have never heard of before, now feels like an old friend. Reading his short (144 pages), hard-bound book of essays, letters, quotes, one poem and snippets from conversations about the US with people he met outside America, I became engaged with the world again. His conclusions about the US have a ring of truth to them. His love of life in the face of tragedy is heroic. He has loved and has been loved in a way which will make others envious.

It is by no means a perfect book. It is human. Approachable. It invites conversation and asks you to walk with it.

I was angered, saddened, enriched and inspired by this book. Thank you, Michael (and the thoughtful folk at Simon and Schuster).

Blurb: Once upon a time, Michael Katakis lived in a place of big dreams, bright colours and sleight of hand. That place was America.

One night, travelling where those who live within illusions should never go, he stared into the darkness and glimpsed a faded flag where shadows gathered, revealing another America. It was a broken place, bred from fear and distrust – a thousand shards of glass – filled with a people who long ago had given away all that was precious; a people who had been sold, for so long, a foreign betrayal that finally came from within, and for nothing more than a handful of silver.

These essays, letters and journal entries were written as a farewell to the country Michael loves still, and to the wife he knew as his ‘True North’. A powerful and personal polemic, A Thousand Shards of Glass is Michael’s appeal to his fellow citizens to change their course; a cautionary tale to those around the world who idealise an America that never was; and, crucially, a glimpse beyond the myth, to a country whose best days could still lie ahead.

Photograph © Ralph Elliot Starkweather

Photograph © Ralph Elliot Starkweather

About the Author

Author and photographer Michael Katakis has travelled extensively for the past thirty-five years, writing about and photographing a wide range of cultures and geographic locations. His books include Photographs and Words with Dr Kris Hardin, Traveller: Observations from an American in ExileThe Vietnam Veteran’s MemorialSacred Trusts: Essays on Stewardship and Responsibility, and Excavating Voices: Listening to Photographs of Native Americans. Katakis has exhibited his work at the British Library, the Royal Geographical Society in London and the International Gallery, Smithsonian Institution. In 1991 the National Portrait Gallery, Washington D.C., acquired Michael’s portrait of Maya Lin for their collection.

The winner of the signed Frank Lampard Jersey and books is…

During the Football World Cup we gave you a chance to win a Chelsea Jersey signed by football royalty Frank Lampard.

All you needed to do to enter was buy a book from the Frankie’s Magic Football series!

And the lucky winner is…

T.Baer, New Norfolk, TAS

franklamaprd

frankie-and-the-world-cup-carnival

FRANKIE AND THE WORLD CUP CARNIVAL : BOOK 6
by Frank Lampard

Frankie and his friends and their dog, Max, are magic-ed to Brazil where they must track down three key items to help England win the World Cup: the referee’s whistle, a football and the trophy. Their adventures take them through a jungle, a Rio carnival and onto the beach for a game that could change the history of the tournament.

 

Grab a book from the series here


Congratulations to the winner!
For your chance to enter a Booktopia Competition click here

What Katie Read – The June Round Up (by award-winning author Kate Forsyth)

One of Australia’s favourite novelists Kate Forsyth, author of Bitter Greens and The Wild Girl, continues her monthly blog with us, giving her verdict on the books she’s been reading.

I came home from the ANZ Festival of Literature & the Arts in London with a whole bag of books and am slowly reading my way through them. Quite a few of them are by Australian writers who were speakers at the festival – it seems ironic that I had to travel 17,000 kilometres to discover books I could have bought at my local bookstore!

Here’s what I’ve read this month:


Ophelia and the Marvellous Boy

by Karen Foxlee

I really loved Karen’s mysterious and beautiful novel The Midnight Dress, and once I heard Karen speak about her new book Ophelia & the Marvellous Boy I knew at once that it sounded like my kind of book. I bought the gorgeous hard-back in London, and am glad that I did as the production is just exquisite.

The story revolves around eleven-year-old Ophelia who is smart and scientifically minded. She and her sister and father have moved to a city where it never stops snowing, as her father – who is an expert on swords – has taken up a position in a huge, dark, gothic museum filled with secrets and strange things. Ophelia sets out to explore, and finds a locked room hidden away in the depths of the museum. She puts her eyes to the keyhole … and sees a boy’s blue eyes looking out at her. He tells her that he has been a prisoner for three-hundred-and-three-years by an evil Snow Queen and her clock is ticking down towards the end of the world. Only he can stop her … but first he must escape.

A gorgeously written and delicate fairy tale, Ophelia & the Marvellous Boy reminded me of some of my favourite children’s writers such as Cassandra Golds and Laura Amy Schlitz, who are themselves inspired by Nicholas Stuart Grey and George Macdonald.

Grab a copy of Ophelia and the Marvellous Boy here


Dotter of Her Father’s Eye

by Mary Talbot & Bryan Talbot

Another book I bought in London was what I can best describe as a graphic memoir/biography. Told in comic book form, the story compares the life stories of Lucia Joyce, the daughter of the famous writer James Joyce, and that of the book’s author Mary Talbot, daughter of the foremost Joycean scholar, James S. Atherton.

Both narratives begin with the girls’ childhood and show their struggles to grow up in the shadows of difficult and demanding fathers. Lucia wants to dance, but is confined by the petty societal rules of her time. She ends up confined in a madhouse.  Mary rebels against her father, and forges a life for herself. The book shows how she fell in love with a young artist and married him – he is, of course, Bryan Talbot, the illustrator whose incredible artwork adorns every page.The book is acutely intelligent but highly readable, illuminating both the heartbreakingly sad story of Lucia James and the work of two exceptional contemporary artists. Not surpisingly, Dotter of My Father’s  Eyes won the 2012 Costa biography award.

Grab a copy of Dotter of Her Father’s Eye here


The Spare Room

by Helen Garner

I heard Helen speak in London and thought she was warm and funny and beautifully articulate, so I was very pleased to have her sign my copy of her first novel in sixteen years, The Spare Room. Published in 2008, the novel won a swathe of awards including the Barbara Jefferis Award. It reads more like a memoir, being told from the first person point of view of a writer named Helen living in Melbourne and being inspired by events that actually happened in Helen Garner’s life. However, no doubt many of the people and incidents have been changed during the writing process.

The story is driven by the narrator Helen’s fear and distress, after a dear friend who is dying of cancer comes to stay with her for three weeks while undertaking some kind of quack treatment. The writing is crisp and strong and poised, and the characters spring to life on the page with only a few deft strokes. I loved it.

 Grab a copy of The Spare Room here


Goddess 

by Kelly Gardiner

I’m been a big admirer of Kelly Gardiner’s gorgeous historical novels for young adults, Act of Faith and The Sultan’s Eyes, both of which are set in the mid-17th century, one of my favourite historical periods for fiction. Goddess is Kelly’s first novel for adults, based on the fascinating true life story of Julie d’Aubigny, a woman out of step with her own time (The court of the Sun King, Louise XIV, in Paris during the 1680s).

Raised like a boy by her swordsman father, Julie likes to dress like a man and will fight a duel with anyone who crosses her. One night she fights three duels back-to-back, winning them all. She elopes with a young nun and is sentenced to be burned at the stake, but escapes and becomes a famous opera star. The story of her adventures seems too incredible to possibly be true. The book is told in Julie’s voice – witty, intelligent and wry – and the whole is pulled off with wit and flair.

Grab a copy of Goddess here


A Stranger Came Ashore

by Mollie Hunter

Mollie Hunter is a wonderful Scottish writer for children who is not nearly as well-known as she deserves to be. I have many of her books – some collected when I was a child and some (including a signed first edition) collected as an adult. I first read A Stranger Came Ashore when I was about eleven, after borrowing it from my school library. I’ve been looking for it ever since, but could not remember its name. Then, a month or so ago, I read a brief review of it on an English book blog and at once remembered how much I had loved it, and orderd a copy straightaway.

It’s a Selkie tale, set in the Highlands of Scotland sometime in the 19th century. The novel begins with a storm, and a shipwreck, and a handsome, young stranger washed ashore. As his sister begins to fall in love with the stranger, forgetting her childhood sweetheart, 12-year old Robbie Henderson finds himself becoming more and more suspicious. He remembers an old tale his grandfather used to tell him about seals that turn into humans, but cannot believe it could be true. Soon he is caught up in a dark and suspenseful adventure as he tries to save his sister. A Stranger Came Ashore was rightly acclaimed when it was published in 1975, winning many awards including the Boston Globe-Horn Book Award.

Grab a copy of A Stranger Came Ashore here


The Colour Purplethe-color-purple

by Alice Walker

I saw Alice Walker speak at the Sydney Writers Festival in May, and bought The Color Purple which I had read and adored about thirty years ago (it was first published in 1982 – impossible to believe it’s been so long!) I read it all in one gulp and loved it just as much as I did when I was a teenager. I loved the movie too. This book will always be on my list of all-time favourite books.

Blurb:

Set in the deep American south between the wars, this is the classic tale of Celie, a young poor black girl. Raped repeatedly by her father, she loses two children and then is married off to a man who treats her no better than a slave. She is separated from her sister Nettie and dreams of becoming like the glamorous Shug Avery, a singer and rebellious black woman who has taken charge of her own destiny. Gradually Celie discovers the support of women that enables her to leave the past behind and begin a new life.

Grab a Copy of The Colour Purple here


 Burial Rites

by Hannah Kent

I finally had a chance to read this brilliant historical novel by debut author Hannah Kent. Burial Rites been a critical and a commercial success, and deservedly so. The writing is so precise and vivid, and the story so compelling. I found myself stopping to read certain sentences again, just for the pleasure of the words: ‘it is as though the winter has set up home in my marrow.’ Burial Rites is set in Iceland in 1830, the last year in the life of a woman condemned to be executed for murder. The use of real historical documents as epigraphs at the beginning of each section adds to the sense of truth and awfulness. A clever and truly beautiful book.

Grab a copy of Burial Rites here


Some Girls, Some Hats, and Hitler

by Wendy Lower

Sifting through a second-hand bookshop in London, an English editor stumbled upon this self-published memoir of a young Jewish woman in Vienna and – enchanted by her romantic love story and vivid writing style – republished the book.

In 1938 Trudi Kanter was a milliner for the best-dressed women in Vienna. She was beautiful and chic and sophisticated, travelling to Paris to see the latest fashions and selling her hats to some of the most wealthy and aristocratic ladies of Europe. She was madly in love with a charming and wealthy businesseman, and had a loving and close-knit family. Then the Nazis marched into Austria, and everything Trudi knew was in ruins. She and her new husband had to try and find some way to escape and make a new life for themselves … and Trudi would need all her wits and panache just to survive.

Grab a copy of Some Girls, Some Hats, and Hitler here


Kate FKate Forsyth is the bestselling and award-winning author of more than twenty books, ranging from picture books to poetry to novels for both children and adults.

She was recently voted one of Australia’s Favourite Novelists, coming in at No 16. She has been called one of ‘the finest writers of this generation”, and “quite possibly … one of the best story tellers of our modern age.’

Click here to see Kate’s author page

REVIEW: Life or Death by Michael Robotham (Review by Andrew Cattanach)

There seems to be two types of people in this world. Those who love Michael Robotham, and those who haven’t heard of him yet.

It can be difficult for a crime writer to receive critical acclaim and popularity. Books by design are denser than any cop drama on TV, asking questions designed for reflection rather than ratings. Formulas are examined and broken down, cliches noted, thin characters ridiculed.

What sets Michael Robotham apart? A simple, but often neglected factor.

He’s just a wonderful writer.

Life or Death starts with an intriguing premise. Audie Palmer is on the run, having escaped from jail. 10 years of beatings and torture are behind him. But what’s the twist?

He has escaped just one day before he was due to be released.

RoboIn Audie Palmer, Robotham has created a character we can all root for. Lucky in his unluckiness, stoic, brave, principled. He is haunted by the ghosts of the past and by a crime he swears he didn’t commit. But can we trust him? Can we really trust anyone?

While Audie is the heart of the story,  there is plenty of meat around him, an ensemble cast of crooked politicians, kind-hearted criminals and shady FBI agents, not to mention a missing seven million dollars. The waters are murky, and Robotham revels in it.

Life or Death is for the crime fan who likes a story, not just an account. Brilliantly written, intelligent, funny, sad and meticulously mapped out, it’s easy to understand why there has already been so much interest in a big screen adaptation of the novel.

There is nothing more exciting than an author operating at the peak of their powers. With Life or Death, Robotham is doing just that, further strengthening his hold as one of Australia’s finest crime writers. Find out why Audie is on the run, before it’s too late.

Grab a copy of Michael Robotham’s Life or Death here

___________________________________

Andrew Cattanach is a regular contributor to The Booktopia Blog and was shortlisted for The Age Short Story Prize. He enjoys reading, writing and sleeping, though finds it difficult to do them all at once.

You can follow his ramblings on twitter at @andrew__cat

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 1,055 other followers

%d bloggers like this: