What Cathryn Read – Bestselling author Cathryn Hein on her April reading

Australian novelist Cathryn Hein, author of The FallsThe French Prize, Heartland and much more gives her verdict on the books she’s been reading.

With nine books to read and judge for the Romance Writers of America’s prestigious RITA awards – none of which I can tell you about, sorry! – I didn’t have much personal reading time left. But I did manage three wonderful books.


All the Light We Cannot See
Winner of the 2015 Pulitzer Prize

by Anthony Doerr

Oh, this was beautiful! The writing was completely gorgeous, the settings stunningly rendered, and the terrors of occupied France and Nazi obsessions truly frightening in their depiction. The story unfolds in two interweaving narrations. The first is Marie Laure, a blind girl whose father is Master of Locks at the Natural History Museum in Paris. After the Germans occupy Paris, Marie Laure and her father flee to her uncle’s house at Saint-Malo. Meanwhile, orphan Werner grows up in Germany, but when his talents with electronics is spotted, he’s sent to a brutal Hitler Youth academy. As the war progresses, these two characters dance closer and closer.

As well as being named best historical fiction in the 2014 Goodreads Choice Awards, and a slate of other awards, All The Light We Cannot See recently won a Pulitzer Prize. Well deserved, I reckon.

Grab a copy of All the Light We Cannot See here


Red Queen 

by Victoria Aveyard

I didn’t realise this was a young adult fantasy until after I’d started reading but it proved to be another very enjoyable addition to the genre. Mare Barrow is a red blood and therefore relegated to her world’s lowest class. Her people are used as not much more than slave labour to the ruling silver blood class, and cannon fodder in their constant wars. When Mare is given a job in the palace, an accident reveals she has powers no Silver possesses. Frightened of what she is and to explain her power, the Silver ruling family give her a new history. Mare is not longer red but silver and, worse, she’s engaged to a prince of the class she hates.

Plenty of action and intrigue, some pretty cool superhero-type talents, plus a nice hint of romance kept the pages turning.

 Grab a copy of Red Queen here


Lord of the Scoundrels

by Loretta Chase

A rollicking romance by a master storyteller, Lord of Scoundrels is considered one of the genre’s greats. I loved it. The story pitted two extremely clever characters against one another, and the result was a smart and sometimes very funny duel. Spinster Jessica Trent is on a mission to save her not very bright brother from the scandalous and self-described ‘Bane and Blight of the Ballisters’, the Marquess of Dain. Dain thinks he’s more than a match for any woman, and any man for that matter, but he has never met the likes of Jessica. She not only runs rings around him, she ties him in complete knots. The only problem is that she’s having a little too much fun doing it.

A blast!

Grab a copy of Lord of the Scoundrels here


The Strings of Murder

by Oscar de Muriel

Ooh, I adore a good Victorian-era murder or two, and this crime novel didn’t disappoint. Very much in the vein of Sherlock Holmes, the story unfolds when cultured, fussy and stuffy Inspector Ian Frey is sent – much to his horror – from London to the wilds of Edinburgh to help solve the mystery of a murdered violinist. If that wasn’t bad enough his new boss, Detective ‘Nine Nails McGray’, is everything Ian is not. There’s conflict and mystery galore, and even a dabble or two in the macabre.

This is clearly the first in what will be a series. I’ll definitely be buying the next.

Grab a copy of The Strings of Murder here


Cold Deception

by D.B. Tait

D.B. Tait is a new voice in Australian crime fiction and a very welcome addition to the genre. Having worked in the criminal justice system for many years, D.B. really knows her stuff and it shows. The descriptions of prison life were fascinating and sometimes disturbing, and provided a gritty edge to the tale. Ten years ago, Julia Taylor went to prison for murder. Now she’s home in the Blue Mountains but from the first day of her release the peace she so desperately craves is shattered. Everyone has secrets, the biggest of all is Julia’s, and someone seems very afraid she might tell…

A pacy story set in a wonderfully described location, with loads of intrigue and a nice sub-drama involving family relations, plus a touch of romance. Highly recommended.

Grab a copy of Cold Deception here


Captive Prince / Prince’s Gambit

by C.S. Pacat

I don’t even know where to begin with this series. Gobsmacking hardly seems to cover it. What I can say is that it’s a stunningly written fantasy, stuffed with political intrigue, that had me hooked from page one and kept me in its grip until it’s end.

Captive Prince begins with Damen, hero and true heir to Akielos, being presented as a slave gift to his country’s arch enemy after Damen’s half-brother suddenly seizes the Akielos throne. Damen’s new master is the beautiful but vicious Prince Laurent. Before long, Damen is caught up in the deadly fight that is Veretian politics. What follows is a tale full of unexpected and breathtaking twists, most of which I never saw coming.

This series is incredible. It’s sometimes erotic and sometimes violent, but always fascinating and unlike anything I’ve ever read. Amazing. Hurry up book three!

Grab a copy of Captive Prince & Prince’s Gambit here


Hein, CathrynThanks Cathryn Hein, we look forward to seeing what you have read next month!

Cathryn Hein was born in South Australia’s rural south-east. With three generations of jockeys in the family it was little wonder she grew up horse mad, finally obtaining her first horse at age 10. So began years of pony club, eventing, dressage and showjumping until university beckoned.

Armed with a shiny Bachelor of Applied Science (Agriculture) from Roseworthy College she moved to Melbourne and later Newcastle, working in the agricultural and turf seeds industry. Her partner’s posting to France took Cathryn overseas for three years in Provence where she finally gave in to her life-long desire to write. Her short fiction has been recognised in numerous contests, and published in Woman’s Day.

 Click here to see Cathryn’s author page

The Falls

by Cathryn Hein

For as long as she can remember, Teagan Bliss has wanted to manage her family’s property. She’s invested everything in the farm, knowing that when her parents retire she’ll be ready to take the reins. But when a family betrayal leaves her reeling, Teagan is forced to rethink her entire future.

Heartbroken, Teagan flees to her aunt’s property in the idyllic Falls Valley. Vanessa is warm and welcoming and a favourite of the locals who drop in regularly for cocktail hour. Teagan soon catches the attention of sexy local farrier Lucas Knight, and with a new job, new friends and the prospect of a new relationship, she slowly begins to open up again.

But the village is a hotbed of gossip and division and when Teagan gets caught up in town politics, Lucas and Vanessa become concerned. As the tension in town escalates, Teagan must decide who to trust. But when she realises those close to her have been keeping secrets, the fallout may split Teagan apart forever.

Grab a copy of The Falls here

Fan of Fleur McDonald or the new movie Home? You might have won…

March and April were amazing months for prizes! We gave three fans of Fleur McDonald the chance to win her backlist pack, worth $99, and fans of the new movie Home the chance to win a Home pack!


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All you had to do to enter was order Emerald Springs before April 30th!

emerald-springsEmerald Springs

by Fleur McDonald

When suspicions are wrongly aimed at Amelia following the theft of proceeds from the local rodeo after a crash and grab, she must work with a skeptical rural detective to clear her name – and that of the man she loves. Mystery and romance abound in the new novel from the bestselling author of Crimson Dawn.

After finishing university, Amelia Bennett returns to Jervois and promptly falls in love with the wonderful – if broke and slightly stubborn – Paul Barnes. Now she’s determined to lose her old reputation for being scatty and unreliable by proving herself as the treasurer of the local rodeo committee and making the more…

…and the winners are:

C. Carr, Longreach, QLD

B.Knight, Dunedoo, NSW

J.Malone, Tumut, NSW

Grab a copy of Emerald Springs here


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All you had to do to enter was buy anything in our Home Film Tie-in series by April 30th!

Dreamworks Home Deluxe Colouring & Puzzle Bookdreamworks-home-deluxe-colouring-puzzle-book

Ideal for felt-tip pens!

Join in the adventure as Tip and Oh race to save Earth … and each other! The Home Deluxe Colouring & Puzzle Book ensures heaps of Boovian fun for every Home fan!

The Boov are searching for a new planet to call home. They find the perfect planet in the middle of nowhere – Earth! The Boov kindly relocate all the humans to Happy Humanstown, and then proceed to completely rearrange the planet! By accidentally telling the Boov’s worst enemy where they are, Oh becomes the number one Boov fugitive. Oh meets Tip, the only human left in Boston, and their hilarious journey to friendship begins.

…and the winner is:

A.Parker, South Penrith, NSW

Check out our Home Film Tie-in series here


Congratulations to the winners!

Don’t have a gift for Mother’s Day because your Mum is too hard to buy for?

Get her a gift certificate from Booktopia and she can pick the books she would love to read!

Who wouldn’t love a book from each of Australia’s 50 Favourite Authors?

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After the success of our Australia’s Favourite Author poll, with John Flanagan coming out on top, we wanted to keep the ball rolling on this Aussie-book-love-in.

We put iconic books, from all the authors voted by you as Australia’s 50 Favourite, into a series and offered the chance to win this amazing collection to anyone who ordered from the collection.

All you had to do to enter was order from our Australia’s Favourite Authors collection by April 30th!

…and the winner is:

M.Argus, Toolamba, VIC

Congratulations to the winner!

Missed our Australia’s Favourite Author Poll? Click here for a full recap.

Don’t have a gift for Mother’s Day because your Mum is too hard to buy for?

Get her a gift certificate from Booktopia and she can pick the books she would love to read!

Are you a winner of an amazing prize in time for Mother’s Day?

In the lead up to Mother’s Day we’ve had some amazing prizes to give away, perfect for any Mum!

We’ve had a Pan Macmillan Mother’s Day hamper worth $500, 1 of 5 Liane Moriarty backlist packs and a $250 gift voucher from Leona Edmiston!


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wardrobe-101-for-mumsAll you had to do to enter was order Wardrobe 101 for Mums by April 28th!

Wardrobe 101 for Mums: Fashion Formulas for Modern Mothers

by Dijanna Mulhearn

Following on from Wardrobe 101: How to Create Your Perfect Core Wardrobe, fashion guru Dijanna Mulhearn is offering style advice to time-poor mothers.

Wardrobe 101 for Mums is a go-to guide for women who long to look good with little effort. Between juggling young children and navigating a post-pregnancy figure, dressing stylishly can be overwhelming; and the last thing on the minds of many new mothers.

Don’t be tempted by the tracksuit or resort to simple jeans and t-shirt when this book is chock full of tips that show you how to look fabulous in a flash. Dijanna Mulhearn has devised helpful tricks for looking chic regardless of more…

…and the winner is:

D.Isackson, Cottesloe, WA

Grab a copy of Wardrobe 101 for Mums here


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All you had to do to enter was order a book from the Pan Macmillan Mother’s Day collection by April 28th!

Broken Juliet : The Starcrossed Series : Book 2broken-juliet

by Leisa Rayven

Some loves never let you go…Cassie swore she’d never forgive Ethan for breaking her heart when they were in acting school years ago. He was her one great love, and when he refused to love her back, a part of her died forever…or so she thought. Now she and Ethan are sharing a Broadway stage, and he’s determined to win her back.

Finally he’s able to say all the things she needed to hear years ago…but can she believe him? Has he really changed, and what makes this time different from all his other broken promises?The answer lies somewhere in the past, and now the truth will come to light. Will Cassie rediscover what it’s like to be trusting and open again–the way she more…

…and the winner is:

M.Gattone,  Brighton East, VIC

Grab a copy of Broken Juliet here


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All you had to do to enter was order Big Little Lies by April 28th!

Big Little Lies

by Liane Moriarty

‘I guess it started with the mothers.’

‘It was all just a terrible misunderstanding.’

‘I’ll tell you exactly why it happened.’

Pirriwee Public’s annual school Trivia Night has ended in a shocking riot. A more…

…and the winners are:

D.Webb, Orelia, WA
L.Tindall, Raworth, NSW
E.Nicholson, Wamuran, QLD
F.Worland, Forbes, NSW
S.Glyde, Leeming, WA

Grab a copy of Big Little Lies here


Congratulations to the winners!
Not a winner? Don’t worry, we have more prizes to giveaway! You could win an awesome Mother’s Day gift.
Check them out here.

REVIEW: The Secrets of Sir Richard Kenworthy by Julia Quinn (Review by Hayley Shephard)

The Secrets of Sir Richard Kenworthythe-secrets-of-sir-richard-kenworthy was a fun, engaging read. While at times I was filled with anxiety for the characters I was also laughing really hard at other moments. And trust me, it takes something really special to make me laugh hard.

That’s what I love about regency books and authors today, especially Julia Quinn. The stories reflect humans that are just as strange, endearing and awkward as their modern counterparts. I am not saying that they are more romantic than stories written actually during the era or a contemporary romance, it’s just nice to read.

The heroine, Miss Iris Smythe-Smith, has been forced into marriage with a man called Sir Richard Kenworthy. And he’s a man with a secret. But what is it?

Julia Quinn kept me guessing. She lulled me into a false sense of security. She kept me entertained, and I forgot to search for clues. Not only was the writing so descriptive but the banter, the interplay between the characters, was perfect for two people who are trying to deal with what was before them. So awkward is it at times that I was both bordering on hysterics and wincing, covering my eyes.

What’s the secret? How did Iris find herself in this mess? I guess you’ll just have to read it and find out.

As for me, this book will definitely be re-read.

Grab a copy of The Secrets of Sir Richard Kenworthy here


The Secrets of Sir Richard Kenworthy

by Julia Quinn

From New York Times bestselling author Julia Quinn comes the final, dazzling installment of a four-book series featuring the Smythe-Smiths.

Sir Richard Kenworthy has less than a month to find a bride. He knows he can’t be too picky, but when he sees Iris Smythe-Smith hiding behind her cello at her family’s infamous musicale, he thinks he might have struck gold. She’s the type of girl you don’t notice until the second-or third-look, but there’s something about her, something simmering under the surface, and he knows she’s the one.

Iris Smythe-Smith is used to being underestimated. With her pale hair and quiet, sly wit she tends to blend into the background, and she likes it that way. So when Richard Kenworthy demands an introduction, she is suspicious. He flirts, he charms, he gives every impression of a man falling in love, but she can’t quite believe it’s all true. When his proposal of marriage turns into a compromising position that forces the issue, she can’t help thinking that he’s hiding something . . . even as her heart tells her to say yes.

About the Author

During her senior year at Harvard College, Julia Quinn (often known in cyberspace as JQ) realized that she didn’t know what she wanted to do with her life. This depressed her. In fact, the only thing that saved her sanity during this dark, dreary time was the fact that none of her friends knew, either. So she sat down with a big tub of Ben & Jerry’s and a good book and decided to figure out what to do.

Getting a job seemed too difficult. She wouldn’t mind HAVING a job, but she certainly didn’t know how to get one.

Law school seemed too annoying. Everyone hated lawyers, and Julia liked to be more…

Grab a copy of The Secrets of Sir Richard Kenworthy here


Jacinta Tynan, author of Mother Zen, answers Ten Terrifying Questions

mother-zen

The Booktopia Book Guru asks

Jacinta Tynan

author of Mother Zen

Ten Terrifying Questions
____________

1. To begin with why don’t you tell us a little bit about yourself – where were you born? Raised? Schooled?

I was born and raised in Sydney’s Sutherland Shire (known simply as ‘The Shire’) as one of six kids in a suburb called Yowie Bay, but I went to high school in the eastern suburbs commuting an hour-and-a-half in each direction. Train time was reading time.

2. What did you want to be when you were twelve, eighteen and thirty? And why?

Actress, journalist, writer. That was the order of my desires and it still goes back and forth. From as long as I can remember I wanted to be an actor taking myself off to acting classes on weekends and summer holidays, but I also wrote stories and dreamed one day of writing a book. I settled on a career in journalism because I decided it was the ideal combination of my two passions. I have always been fascinated by other people’s lives so I get to delve into those – as a journalist and a writer.

Author Jacinta Tynan

 

3. What strongly held belief did you have at eighteen that you do not have now?

That love will last forever. My first love was a beautiful boy and my best friend who died suddenly just shy of my 19th birthday. I learnt quickly that the rug can be pulled out from under you at any moment, and have been wary of complacency ever since.

4.    What were three big events – in the family circle or on the world stage or in your reading life, for example – you can now say, had a great effect on you and influenced you in your career path?

1.    Reading as a child got the whole ball rolling. I am certain of that. My mother would read to us often (with six of us it was collective story time) and we were always given books as presents, a stack at the end of the bed from Santa every Christmas. I still have several of my favourite books today which I am now reading to my boys: The Fairy Who Wouldn’t Fly (Pixie O’Harris), The Little Black Princess (Mrs Aeneas Gunn) and Dot and The Kangaroo (Ethel Pedley), for example.

2.    Losing my first love. I was already studying journalism when Simon died, so I was on the path, but my life changed forever in that moment. In my grief I decided to make the most of this life and make it mean something so the pain wouldn’t be for nothing. I’m sure the experience also made me understand people at a deeper level. I am not afraid of other people’s heartache or suffering: handy stuff for a journalist and writer of any sort.

97807322993783. I had been working as a journalist for several years when I decided to do a ‘writing course’. Even though I got the opportunity to write scripts on a daily basis as a TV Reporter (at that stage with ABC’s 7:30 Report), I yearned to be more creative. So I did a ‘Life Writing’ workshop with Patti Miller and it was like a light went on. Patti believes we all have a story in us, something to share with others, and I found so did I.

5.    Considering the innumerable electronic media avenues open to you – blogs, online newspapers, TV, radio, etc – why have you chosen to write a book? Aren’t they obsolete?

Nothing will ever replace holding a real life book in your hand as you kick back and devour it. I work in all the other media (I’m a TV journalist — a News Presenter with Sky, I write for newspapers — Columnist for Sunday Life, and I have a blog), so I don’t shy away from them and they certainly have their place but, as a writer with a chunk of information to impart, books are still the ideal format. I couldn’t say all I needed to say in a blog. Not in one go. I know I’m behind on this but I’m yet to read an e-book. I can only stare at a computer screen for so long. Even when I’m reading online — a newspaper or blog  — I usually print the pages out so I have the hard copy version instead. As for TV, the first question when we’re considering a story is always “Do we have vision?” The written word gets around that tricky problem of having no pictures.

 

6.    Please tell us about your latest book…mother-zen

I wrote Mother Zen because I wanted to read it. When I became a mother (to two little boys) I was surprised to find it as enjoyable and rewarding as I do because most of the literature about motherhood is negative. There are some really helpful and insightful advice books out there, but the predominant message is that being a mother is a tough and thankless task that must be endured. I wanted to balance that out a bit, to explore why so many parents find it a challenge and see if there’s a way to shift that. Maybe it’s up to us and not our circumstances.

The book is part memoir about my fledgling journey as a new mother, but it also weaves in interviews with parenting experts and other parents.
It is also a look at an alternative way of being — to be present and grateful — as we negotiate the often overwhelming new role we find ourselves in, being responsible for the life of another and so often without the ‘village’ we were promised it would take to raise our child.

Grab a copy of Mother Zen here

7.    If your work could change one thing in this world – what would it be?

That all mums, no matter what their circumstances, could access the utter joy that’s available to us all.

8.    Whom do you most admire and why?

My mother. For bringing six of us into the world and keeping it all (and us all) together.

9.    Many people set themselves very ambitious goals. What are yours?

My ambition has changed course dramatically since I became a mother. I used to be distractingly hungry for the next thing and what I had going on was never enough. Now, my greatest goal is to be a good mother to my boys — loving, present, available, a solid role model, someone they will always trust and turn to. I want to inspire them (as a mother and a woman) and guide them and raise them to have empathy and emotional intelligence. “I am your constant,” I say to them. I’m well aware that no matter what we do as a parent we won’t always get it right. But my greatest hope is that with that foundation they can fly.

10. What advice do you give aspiring writers?

  • Write. I didn’t even know what I wanted to write when I started writing, I just knew I had to. I had been a journalist for several years so I got to write every day, but I wanted to be more creative, only I wasn’t sure how to go about that.
  • So, I took a writing course (also highly recommended for aspiring writers, no matter how good you are) which ‘forced’ me to deliver copy. And from that came the inklings of my first book.
  • Also good writers observe. We all see the same things but it’s writers who see meaning in them.
  • Take notes. Write down ideas, random thoughts, quotes, simple moments. We think we’ll remember but we a rarely do. It’s those notes (tapped into my i-Phone with my thumb) that ‘saved’ me when I was given only five months to write Mother Zen. Much of the research had already been done.

Jacinta, thank you for playing.

Grab a copy of Mother Zen here


mother-zenMother Zen

by Jennifer Niven

In 2010 Jacinta Tynan innocently sparked a media storm when her article in the Sun Herald exposed a fault line in our perception of motherhood. Her premise — that motherhood could be easy — split the parenting community down the middle. Many agreed with Jacinta while others argued that motherhood was arduous and thankless, all were equally passionate in their beliefs.

Four years later, now with two small children, Jacinta takes us on a fascinating journey through her own experiences of motherhood — from being so sick with her first pregnancy that she was throwing up in between her on-air segments, to her doubts about her ability to cope — and shows us her struggle to parent ‘consciously’, using meditation and attempting mindfulness to help her more…

About the Author

Jacinta is a well-known news presenter, author and columnist. She regularly writes opinion pieces for national newspapers and frequently appears as a guest commentator on a number of television networks across the country. She is also the author of Good Man Hunting, and edited the anthology Some Girls Do: My Life as a Teenager with royalties donated to SISTER2Sister, a mentor program for teenage girls for whom Jacinta is patron. Tynan lives in Sydney with her partner and two young sons.

Grab a copy of Mother Zen here

GUEST BLOG: Five Things I Learnt From Editing Mothermorphosis (by Monica Dux)

The importance of valuing the hard work of writers.

The effort that goes into good short form writing is frequently undervalued. People often imagine that all it takes is for someone to come up with an idea, sit down and type out an essay, run a spell check, then deliver their work.

Of course writing a strong essay is so much more than this; for most of us it’s a long and arduous process, from conception to execution, involving an enormous amount of thought, re-writing, re-thinking, editing and polishing. The net result of all this labour is to submerge the effort that was required, making the finished piece read as if it really was easy and effortless.

All the writers who contributed to this collection were professional, and the quality of work reveals how much time and thought they put into their pieces. This is a collection that relied on the good will of its contributors, so I was profoundly grateful for their efforts.

That every mother really does have an important story to tell.

Susan Carland, one of the contributors in Mothermorphosis, wrote in her essay “My unique tale is just the same as yours”.

In the past I’ve thought a lot about this tension, but it became more pronounced for me when reading the contributions. Every mother has her own unique story to tell, but there are also so many things that bind us all, so much that is universal. It’s a fascinating contradiction.

As an editor, it’s amazing how good a prompt, polite decline can make you feel.

There were a few women I invited to contribute to this book who weren’t able to write something for the collection but who declined the offer quickly and graciously. Getting such rejections felt almost as valuable as having a writer come back saying they’d be happy to contribute.

I’m often invited to participate in projects that I don’t have the time or resources for. Editing Mothermorphosis was a timely reminder about the importance of being polite and positive about such offers, even if you are unable to be involved.

Editing is fun.

I thoroughly enjoyed putting the collection together. Instead of having to angst over my own work, I was able to luxuriate in the excellent work of other writers.

It was a real privilege facilitating this book, especially knowing that we are hoping to raise awareness for PANDA, the Post and Antenatal Depression Association. I feel that not only will the collection be enjoyed by many people, but it also has the potential to contribute to an organisation for which I have immense admiration.

That it’s hard to write an introduction for a collection that you’ve edited.

It took me a long time to get my introduction right. When you’re a contributor you can follow your own path, writing in relative isolation. By comparison, introducing a collection requires you to strike a peculiar sort of balance. To be interesting and engaging, without dominating. To showcase the individual essays in the collection, without simply name checking the various contributors. To write something that contextualises the work and draws out the underlying themes, without resorting to empty generalisations. In the end I hope I managed to pull it off, although I’ll leave it to the readers to decide!

Grab a copy of Mothermorphosis here

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mduxmug-edit-smaller1Monica Dux is a columnist with The Age, a social commentator and author of Things I Didn’t Expect (when I was expecting), and co-author of The Great Feminist Denial.

She can be heard regularly on ABC radio and 3RRR, and has published widely, especially on women’s issues.

You can find Monica on twitter at @monicadux

——————————–

mothermorphosisMothermorphosis

Australia’s Best Storytellers Write About Becoming a Mother

In Mothermorphosis , some of Australia’s most talented writers and storytellers share their own experiences of motherhood. In telling their stories they articulate the complex internal conflicts, the exhilaration and the absurdity of the transformation that takes place when we become mothers. We read about the yearning for a child, the private and public expressions of maternal love, the questioning, uncertainty and unexpected delight, as well as unfathomable loss.

Mothermorphosis reveals that there is no ‘right’ version of this epic experience and no single tale that could ever speak for all mothers. Yet it is in reading about other women’s experiences and dash;the hard bits, the joyous bits and even the ridiculous bitsandmdash;that we can become more compassionate, not just to other mothers but hopefully to ourselves.

Mothermorphosis includes writing from: Kate Holden, Kathy Lette, Lorelei Vashti, Rebecca Huntley, George McEnroe, Fatima Measham, Jo Case, Hilary Harper, Cordelia Fine, Jane Caro, Hannah Robert, Susan Carland, Kerri Sackville, Catherine Deveny, Lee Kofman and Dee Madigan.

Grab a copy of Mothermorphosis here

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