Richard Glover talks to Booktopia TV about his memoir, Flesh Wounds

Richard Glover talks to us about his new book, Flesh Wounds – part family memoir, part rollicking venture into 1970s Australia. In this poignant read, Glover delves into his past, understanding that he must come to terms with it if he is ever to lay it to rest. That includes accepting his parents’ past indiscretions, from his mother running off with his Tolkien-obsessed English teacher to his alcoholic father …

Grab your copy of Flesh Wounds here.

Flesh Wounds

Richard Glover

Richard Glover

A mother who invented her past, a father who was often absent, a son who wondered if this could really be his family.

Richard Glover’s favourite dinner party game is called ‘Who’s Got the Weirdest Parents?’. It’s a game he always thinks he’ll win. There was his mother, a deluded snob, who made up large swathes of her past and who ran away with Richard’s English teacher, a Tolkien devotee, nudist and stuffed-toy collector. There was his father, a distant alcoholic, who ran through a gamut of wives, yachts and failed dreams. And there was Richard himself, a confused teenager, vulnerable to strange men, trying to find a family he could … Read more.

Grab your copy of Flesh Wounds here.

Garth Nix talks to Booktopia TV about his new book, Newt’s Emerald

Australian bestselling author Garth Nix talks to us about his new book, Newt’s Emerald, an enchanting regency romance centred around an intrepid young lady, dashing young hero, French spies, a case of mistaken identity and an enchanted moustache. Yep, an enchanted moustache!

Order your copy of Newt’s Emerald here and for a limited time receive a signed copy!

Newt’s Emerald

Garth Nix

Newt's emerald

After the Newington Emerald is stolen at the height of a conjured storm, eighteen-year-old Lady Truthful Newington goes to London to search for the magical heirloom of her house. But as no well-bred young lady can hunt the metropolis for a stolen jewel, she has to disguise herself as a man, and is soon caught up in a dangerous adventure where she must risk her life, her reputation…and her heart.

Balancing twin roles as a young lady coming out in her first season and as an intrepid young man up against an evil sorceress isn’t easy, but Truthful has to manage it. Her father’s life and even the fate of England may depend upon her recovering the Newington Emerald!

Read Sarah McDuling’s review here.

Order your copy of Newt’s Emerald here and for a limited time receive a signed copy!

Sink your teeth into the new Twilight Tenth Anniversary/Life and Death dual edition!

Fans of the Twilight Saga: rejoice!Twilight Tenth Anniversary Edition

Today, a special Twilight Tenth Anniversary/ Life and Death dual edition is available, pairing the original Twilight with a reimagining – Life and Death –  by Stephenie Meyer.

The twist?

In Life and Death, the iconic tale is told through the eyes of a human teenage boy in love with a female vampire. So Bella is now Beau; Edward is now female vampire Edythe.

Meyer decided to flip the genders in part due to her readers who approached her at signings, concerned that Bella was too much a ‘damsel in distress’.

Why now?

“It’s amazing to me that ten years have passed since Twilight was first published”, says Meyer. “For me, this anniversary is a celebration of the fans, with all of their incredible passion and dedication. I’m excited to get to spend time with them again.”

Since it was published in 2005, Twilight became a New York Times bestseller, with its sequels New Moon, Eclipse and Breaking Dawn selling over 100 million copies worldwide. The series also spawned into a blockbuster film franchise, winning 32 Teen Choice Awards and 17 MTV Movie Awards. Oh…and grossed a whopping $1.1 billion globally!

Grab your copy of Twilight Tenth Anniversary/ Life and Death dual edition here

Did Sylvia Plath’s suicide note reveal a new lover?

Ted hughes biographyThe widespread belief that American poet Sylvia Plath killed herself after Ted Hughes left her for another woman could be…well, false. Jonathan Bate, author of Ted Hughes: The Unauthorised Life, reveals in The Guardian that Plath’s suicide letter may have mentioned another man, one she was intimate with in the last months of her life.

In countless biographies and Hollywood film adaptations, Sylvia Plath and Ted Hughe’s life has been depicted as follows: after six years of marriage and two children, Hughes left Plath for Assia Wevill, a woman who he described in his poem ‘Dreamers’ (Birthday Letters) as “Slightly filthy with erotic mystery – A German Russian Israeli with the gaze of a demon.”

On the fateful day Plath took her own life, she called Hughes incessantly, however was unable to reach him. The birthday-lettersquestion then arises: did she call anyone else? Another man she was intimate with? New discoveries suggest that perhaps she did. In his article, Bate outlines compelling insights as to why this could be the case, the below being one:

“The story I have heard is this … Sinclair is convinced of the story’s truth because the source, who is no longer alive, was a woman of unimpeachable integrity, a much-loved editor named Frances Lindley at the publisher Harper & Row in New York. At a book party in the city, she spoke to someone who said that they had seen Plath’s last letter. It allegedly revealed that she did telephone another man that last weekend, in a desperate bid to renew their brief liaison. He told her that he was now in a relationship with another woman. Yet one more male rejection: this could have been the thing that tipped her over the edge.” (The Guardian)

Sylvia and Ted 2So perhaps it wasn’t Hughes who drove her to her untimely demise, but a new lover. However as evidence is inconclusive at present, we’ll have to wait a little longer for the truth.

Read the full article here.

Swedish author, Henning Mankell, dies aged 67

MankellHenning Mankell, Swedish crime writer and leading figure in Nordic Noir has died aged 67 from cancer. Leopard, his Swedish publisher revealed he died in his sleep.

In early 2014 Mankell visited an orthopaedic surgeon in Stockholm, believing he had a slipped disc. However tests revealed a tumour in his lung and neck, with evidence it had spread to other areas of his body. He went on to write a book about his experience –  Quicksand: What It Means to be a Human Being.

Mankell was best known for his Wallander series, with 11 of his approximately 40 novels starring Kurt Wallander, Swedish police detective. The series inspired a series of Swedish films featuring Rolf Lassgård and Swedish and UK TV adaptations featuring Krister Henriksson and Kenneth Branagh respectively.

Grab your copy of the internationally besteselling The Kurt Wallander series here

Among his accolades, Mankell received the Gold Dagger Award, the Astrid Lindgren Prize and the Erich-Maria-Remarque Peace Award. He worked extensively with AIDS charities in Africa, saying that “I don’t know why, but when I stepped out of the plane in Africa I had the odd feeling of coming home” (from his website).

Henning Mankell in Africa

He leaves behind Eva Bergman, his wife of 17 years and his son, Jon Mankell, a film producer who helped bring Stieg Larsson’s Girl With The Dragon Tattoo series to the big screen.

He has sold more than 40 million copies of his books. They have been translated in over 40 languages.

Henning Mankell’s Top 10 Quotes

Martyna Angell, author of The Wholesome Cook answers Ten Terrifying Questions

 The Booktopia Book Guru asks

Martyna Angell

author of The Wholesome Cook

Ten Terrifying Questions

1. To begin with why don’t you tell us a little bit about yourself – where were you born? Raised? Schooled?

Martyna Angell Cover

I was born and raised in Poland and real food was always part of my upbringing. I grew up in and around Warsaw, the capital, and the city’s food scene was an interesting mixture of the old and the new. So you would have daily fresh produce markets, neighbourhood grocers selling veggies (I loved buying fermented pickles as snacks after school) as well as the modern fast food chains opening outlets in the city for the first time and big supermarkets setting up shop. It was a very interesting time in terms of exposure to the new but culturally we were still respecting traditions and cooking from scratch. Indeed, it was in one of my fifth-grade home economics classes that I learnt to make sauerkraut (recipe page 69).

I completed my high school studies here in Sydney, then dabbled in law and business administration studies before realising I needed a more creative outlet, so I completed a communications degree. Food, however, has always remained my true passion  and styling and photography followed suit naturally and are a big part of what I do now.

2.What did you want to be when you were twelve, eighteen and thirty? And why?

I was around twelve years old when I first discovered my passion for cooking and the joy it could bring to others as well as me. On weekends, I’d rummage through the fridge, pantry and freezer then write up a dinner menu for my parents to order from. Then I’d get cooking.

Most of my fondest childhood memories revolve around food, family celebrations and meals enjoyed together. When I turned eighteen cooking was not really considered a career choice so I went off to do a whole range of things but none of them made me truly happy. It wasn’t until I got closer to thirty that I realised where my heart lay, and food became the main focus for me again. This time, having recovered from a junk food past that put me on the edge of obesity, I wanted to share my story and make sure that my cooking, the recipes I shared with my friends, family and readers were all about real food, (and an occasional indulgence).

3.What strongly held belief did you have at eighteen that you do not have now?

That life begins at 18. Martyna Angell 1Now I think it really begins at 30, but if you ask me the same question in ten years’ time I have a feeling I know what the answer might be…40?

4.What were three big events in your life or the world around you that had a great effect on you and influenced your cooking?

Moving to Australia definitely opened my taste buds to a whole new world of food — fresh seafood and South East Asian flavour influences and ingredient availability — which I absolutely adored. However, it also introduced me to a whole new range of processed and fast foods. Despite a short-term infatuation with junk food in my early twenties, real food has been one of the most grounding forces in my cooking. I’ve realised it is the easiest single choice we can make for our health and well-being. Cooking from scratch and eating real food that’s best for our bodies with an occasional indulgence is a philosophy I’ve adopted after completing studies with the Institute for Integrative Nutrition — another game changer for me. It’s also a philosophy I now live with my family and share in The Wholesome Cook.

5.What are some dishes you wouldn’t eat as a child that you love now?

I was never a fussy eater: I thoroughly enjoyed tripe and liver and had fermented pickles as a snack almost every day. However, and I think many might agree with me here, Brussels sprouts were not really my thing. Our school diner used to serve soup filled with overcooked mushy Brussels sprouts that sent the pungent aroma permeating through the entire school. It was nauseating. No one was a big fan. I’ve since learnt to prepare them in a more palatable way. They are fantastic shredded into a raw slaw or gently charred, roasted or stir-fried (see page 111 for recipe). They are sweet, slightly nutty and delicious that way.

6.Please tell us about your latest book…

The Wholesome Cook is not a diet book or an eat-that-but-not-this book. It’s all about making a lifestyle change for the long term that suits you; it focuses on eating clean, real food that’s best for you, most of the time. It contains over 170 refined sugar-free recipes for how we eat now — theMartyna Angell 3 bioindividual way. What it means is that every recipe has a gluten-free option and many come with options for other dietary needs such as diary-free, paleo, vegetarian and vegan. Many are also egg- and nut-free. They are all delicious.

As mentioned earlier, I was brought up with wholesome food — packets and processed food weren’t allowed in our house — but when I hit my twenties, I fell in love with junk food. The result? Within a year I had piled on 20 kilograms and when I stopped fitting into my favourite work suits that ran out at size 14, I knew I had to make a change. It wasn’t the size or particular numbers on the scales that scared me, although they helped make it real, it was the threat of being technically and truly obese that made me decide enough was enough. I needed to take back control of my cravings, my weight and my life.  But I wanted this change to be permanent. And so, I went back to basics: the basics of eating real food.

7.If you had to create one dish to show off your repertoire, what would it be?

It would most likely be Pulled Lamb Nachos (page 240) because they are a simple slow cooker number that uses deboned shoulder — a secondary meat cut from pasture-raised animals. Both have become fashionable terms, but having grown up with a grandfather who was a butcher and uncle who had a cattle farm, this kind of sustainable nose-to-tail eating was commonplace in our family. It is something that had, perhaps, waned in popularity but is now starting to see a comeback.

The dish is a favourite with the kids and most of our guests who have tried it are really pleasantly surprised with the use of lamb and a few additional tricks I’ve learned over the years to make the junk food to wholefood makeover easier. It’s served with a good choice of fresh salads, good fats from the avocado and probiotic-rich yoghurt instead of sour cream. Even the corn chips are plain — Martyna Angell 5a little indulgence without the junk.

8.Whom do you most admire and why?

I always find stories of those who have made a sea change inspiring, especially those who have done so to grow real food. I admire the courage it takes to drop everything for a simpler (if not necessarily easier) and happier life.

9.Many people set themselves very ambitious goals. What are yours?

My goal is to create a ripple effect by highlighting the merits of eating real, wholefood while at the same time acknowledging that we are all a little different and no single diet fits everyone the same, no matter how fashionable it may be. My goal is also to teach our kids that being able to cook real food from scratch and listening to their body is not hard, nor does it have to be super expensive or time consuming. I believe it’s a skill that will set them up for life of real nourishment. While I will continue to share recipes on the blog, I would love to write another cookbook/wellness guide focused on the benefits of eating well seasonally.

10.What advice do you give aspiring chefs?

Never stop exploring and learning. Practical experience is invaluable, whether it’s through travel, eating out, working in a restaurant kitchen or a farmer’s market or by helping out with animal-rearing. And always keep an open mind to fuel your creativity.

Thank you for playing, Martyna.

Grab your copy of The Wholesome Cook here

The Wholesome Cook

Martyna Angell

Martyna Angell profileThese days we all want to eat the kind of food that doesn’t compromise on flavour or health: clean wholefoods, fresh fruit and vegetables, pasture-raised meat. But it’s also true that what works in your diet for you, may not work for someone else. In The Wholesome Cook, talented cook and award-winning blogger Martyna Angell offers 170 nutritious and delicious recipes that are endlessly adaptable, cater to dietary restrictions and inspire lifestyle changes.

Every recipe is gluten – and processed sugar – free with an emphasis on wholefoods, and many also accommodate dairy-free, nut-free, paleo, vegan and vegetarian diets. These recipes are all about options …  Read more


Grab your copy of The Wholesome Cook here



5 reasons you should check out our Christmas in July Sale

ChristmasInJuly_NewsletterBanner-616x150px1. Because books. Right?


You know that time when there’s nothing to do and you’re bored out of your mind.

Yeah, neither do we.

2. You’ll thank yourself in December


Think of that awkward cousin who invites themselves to Christmas lunch last minute. Or that weird co-worker who smells of onions who gets you a present on the last day of work for the year. Or the Secret Santa that you forgot about.

Buy up big while the prices are this ridiculous (over 10,000 titles for less than $10), and you’ll thank yourself when the silly season rolls around in a few months.

3. You can never have too many books


Plug those gaps in your shelves, fill your draws, have a pile sitting on the floor in your living room like you’re a 1950s playwright. You have room for more books, TRUST US!

4. A truckload of kids books


It’s always nice to treat the little ones to a gorgeous masterpiece, but that shouldn’t mean that you should spend the big bucks on every kids book. With nearly 5,000 kids titles for less than $5, get some easy winners for the kids to keep them on their toes during story time.

5. It ends really soon


July is nearly over, which mean Christmas in July is nearly over!

You only have a few days left to snap up a huge bargain, with most prices never to be repeated.

So, what are you waiting for? Get to it!

ChristmasInJuly_NewsletterBanner-616x150pxClick here to check out our Christmas in July Sale!


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