GUEST BLOG: What Katie Read – The October Roundup (by award-winning author Kate Forsyth)

One of Australia’s favourite novelists Kate Forsyth, author of The Impossible Quest, Bitter Greens, The Wild Girl and now The Beast’s Garden, continues her monthly blog with us, giving her verdict on the books she read in October.

My son – like so many others his age – sat his HSC last month, and so I spent lots of time waiting for him outside exam halls and libraries. This meant lots of lovely reading for me! – Kate Forsyth

Newt’s Emerald

Garth Nix

newt-s-emeraldGarth Nix is one of my favourite Young Adult fantasy writers, and Regency romances are one of my favourite genres to read – put the two together and you get the wonderful, light-hearted, and utterly magical Newt’s Emerald.

Set in a world very much like Georgette Heyer’s Regency (a place that is in itself a fantasy), the book mixes together a stolen emerald with secret powers, a young lady who disguises herself as a man, a young nobleman who is really a spy, an evil enchantress, and a host of comic minor characters, plus an ill-fated ball in Brighton.

I raced through it with great eagerness, and am now hoping that Garth plans to write many, many more. An utter delight!

Grab your copy of Newt’s Emerald here

India Black

Carol K. Carr

india-blackIndia Black is the name of the central character in this rather charming Victorian murder mystery. She is a madam, in the sense that she runs a brothel, and she is only reluctantly drawn into the investigation of the murder of Sir Archibald Latham, an important official in the War Office, because he dies in the bed of one of her tarts.

The foggy underworld of Victorian London is vividly if a little wildly drawn, and the pace rarely falters.

The chief enjoyment of the book is the acerbic and witty voice of India herself – whip-smart, amoral, and always ready to see the humour in a situation.

Grab your copy of India Black here

Picnic in Provence

Elizabeth Bard

picnic-in-provencePicnic In Provence is a memoir of a Jewish American princess who marries a Frenchman, and moves to Provence to make honey & thyme ice-cream, among other wonderful dishes.

Charming , romantic and poignant, this book is full of delicious-sounding recipes and lots of wry observations on the cultural differences between the two countries (fast food, wearing sweatpants in public, and the like).

It made me want to move to Provence and cook stuffed zucchini flowers and fig tarts drizzled with lavender honey, always the sign of a good food memoir.

I’ve since cooked quite a few of the recipes – délicieux!

Grab your copy of Picnic in Provence here

What We See When We Read

Peter Mendelsund

what-we-see-when-we-readA strange, fascinating and totally original book about the relationship between the words on the page and the images seen in the mind’s eye, this is a book to be thought about and re-read again and again.

Peter Mendelsund is the associate art director of Alfred A. Knopf, and spends his days designing book covers and illustrations. Many of the pages in this book have few or no words on them. Instead, they are full of images – photographs, drawings, pop graphics, and scribbles. In a way, it reminded me of the astonishingly beautiful books created by Brian Selznick, in which his intricate black-and-white drawings replace sentences and scenes. Except that What We See When We Read is not creating a narrative – it is instead a meditation on the relationship between the writer’s and the reader’s imagination, partly informed by scientific investigation, but mostly by a certain type of literary criticism.

The book is marred by its literary pretentiousness – lots of references to Tolstoy, Flaubert, Melville, Nabokov, and other dead white males, for example. Virginia Woolf was one of the few female authors to get a mention, and Barthes was quoted quite a few times (something that always sets my alarm bells ringing). However, if you can forgive him for thinking the only writers worth examining are white, male, middle-class and no longer breathing, then the book offers a lot to think about – and some of the passages have their own exquisite and mysterious beauty.

Grab your copy of What We See When We Read here

The Marriage of Opposites

Alice Hoffman

the-marriage-of-oppositesI have loved Alice Hoffman’s writing for a long time, from well before Nicole Kidman starred in the movie of Practical Magic. She has a wonderful way of twisting together the ordinary and the extraordinary, finding magic in the everyday. Many of her earlier books were contemporary magic realism, about lightning struck boys and girls descended from witches, but in recent years she has turned her hand to writing historical fiction, which delights me.

The Marriage of Opposites tells the story of a young Jewish woman growing up on the Caribbean island of St Thomas in the early 1800s. Rachel is married to a widower with three children when she is little more than a girl herself. When her husband dies, she is left as an impoverished young widow with six children. Her dead husband’s nephew arrives from France to take charge of the business … and so begins a passionate love affair that will scandalize the island and, in time, produce the artistic genius that was Camille Pissarro, one of the founders of Impressionism.

Beautiful, romantic, haunting, and alive with sensuality, I cannot recommend The Marriage Of Opposites highly enough. Read it!

Grab your copy of The Marriage of Opposites here

The Folk Keeper

Franny Billingsley


Whenever anyone recommends a book to me that I haven’t read, I write it in the back of my diary and then I hunt the book down. The Folk Keeper was recommended to me by an artist friend, who shares my fascination with selkies and other magical creatures of the sea.

The Folk Keeper is one of those small, perfect books that seem so simple and yet are so hard to create. The first line reads: ‘It is a day of yellow fog, and the Folk are hungry.’ It tells the story of a boy who works as a Folk Keeper in an orphanage, keeping the magical Folk appeased so they will not do harm to the human world. One day a Great Lady arrives, and so the boy’s life is changed forever. He discovers many secrets about himself and his past, uncovers a long-hidden murder and faces death himself, and – in the end – falls in love.

Franny Billingsley won the Boston Globe/Horn Book Award for Fiction with this beautiful children’s fantasy and it is easy to see why. An utterly unforgettable read.

Grab your copy of The Folk Keeper here


Daphne du Maurier

rebeccaSome time ago, I decided that I wanted to re-read all my favourite books again. I love to re-read; it’s an acute pleasure quite different to that of reading a book for the first time. So each month I choose an old book off my bookshelves. This time it was Rebecca by Daphne du Maurier, a book I remember devouring in my late teens but have not read again since.

It was even better than I remembered.

Utterly compulsive, the book moves with all the swiftness and inexorability of a Greek tragedy. It begins with the young and nameless narrator (so clever, to never tell the reader her name!) who falls in love and marries with a much older and more sophisticated man, and moves with him to Manderlay, his grand house in Cornwall. Max de Winter’s first wife, Rebecca, had died some months earlier in mysterious circumstances, and her personality is imprinted everywhere in the house.

The new Mrs de Winter is shy and painfully awkward. She lives intensely in her imagination, and slowly finds herself obsessed with the former Mrs de Winter and with the mystery around her death. The feeling of dread slowly tightens, and yet there are surprises around every corner. Brilliantly plotted and executed, Rebecca is an absolute tour-de-force. If you haven’t read it before, read it now. If you have, read it again. You won’t be sorry.

Grab your copy of Rebecca here

Kate Forsyth

Forsyth, KateKate Forsyth is the bestselling and award-winning author of more than twenty books, ranging from picture books to poetry to novels for both children and adults.

She was recently voted one of Australia’s Favourite Novelists. She has been called one of ‘the finest writers of this generation”, and “quite possibly … one of the best story tellers of our modern age.’

Kate’s books have been published in 14 countries around the world, including the UK, the US, Russia, Germany, Japan, Turkey, Spain, Italy, Poland and Slovenia.

Visit Kate Forsyth’s Booktopia author page

The Beast’s Garden

by Kate Forsyth

Forsyth, Kate - The Beast's GardenA retelling of Beauty and The Beast set in Nazi Germany.

The Grimm Brothers published a beautiful version of the Beauty & the Beast tale called The Singing, Springing Lark in 1819. It combines the well-known story of a daughter who marries a beast in order to save her father with another key fairy tale motif, the search for the lost bridegroom.

In The Singing, Springing Lark, the daughter grows to love her beast but unwittingly betrays him and he is turned into a dove. She follows the trail of blood and white feathers he leaves behind him for seven years, and, when she loses the trail, seeks help from … Read more

Grab your copy of The Beast’s Garden here

GUEST BLOG: Bestselling author Fiona Palmer on what she’s been reading

Fiona PalmerHarvest has started over here in the West of Australia but the rain keeps coming and holding up the headers. I’ve been a bit busy with visits to Perth for Monster Jam (with the kids), Rural, Regional and Remote Women’s Network meetings and related work, then throw in kids’ sports, carnivals, hockey and golf AGM’s, housework, farm work, and writing my next book, which means I haven’t got much time left to read. It’s really sad, but I’ve only managed to read one book in the last month, Rachael John’s The Patterson Girls.

Rachael is a great friend of mine, we have done a few book tours together and support each other in our writing. But that isn’t why I read her work. I pick up Rach’s books because she writes easy to read stories and has an engaging storytelling ability that keeps you turning each page frantic in anticipation. Her books are always full of emotion and The Patterson Girls was definitely that! It follows four different sisters who come home to spend Christmas with their father, six months after their mother has passed away. Each sister has their own journey and while together they learn of a family curse.  Rachael’s stories are going from strength to strength and she’s making a big name for herself.

Even though I haven’t read this next book I’m still recommending it because my mum read it and loved it. Anything my mum has enjoyed I know I will too. The Tea Planter’s Wife by Dinah Jefferies is about Gwendolyn, who leaves her home at nineteen to travel across the world to Ceylon where her new husband Laurence owns a large and prosperous tea plantation. I’m keen to read this story because my grandfather was adopted when he came to Australia as a one-year-old from England. On his adoption papers it lists his father’s name, which states that he was in India working on a tea plantation and that is all we know of him. My mum said she couldn’t put it down, it had her intrigued and she said it was a beautifully written drama. I can’t wait to read it myself.

The Patterson Girls The Tea Planter's Wife












That’s it, just two books from me this time. I am busy trying to write my next book set in Lake Grace, which follows on from The Saddler Boys and includes a Vietnam veteran.  I’m looking forward to including all the little stories I’ve gathered from the vet’s I’ve been talking to. In the meantime, I’ll be spending most of my time on Holly, the New Holland header, and working on my plot as I harvest.

Grab your copy of The Saddler Boys here!

The Saddler Boys

Fiona Palmer The Saddler Boys

School teacher Natalie has always been a city girl. She has a handsome boyfriend and a family who give her only the best. But she craves her own space, and her own classroom, before settling down into the life she is expected to lead.

When Nat takes up a posting at a tiny school in remote Western Australia, it proves quite the culture shock, but she is soon welcomed by the inquisitive locals, particularly young student Billy and his intriguing single father, Drew.

As Nat’s school comes under threat of closure, and Billy’s estranged mother turns up out of the blue, Nat finds herself fighting for the township and battling with her heart. Torn between her society … Read more

Grab your copy of The Saddler Boys here!

Read an extract of The Saddler Boys

Judy Nunn comes to Booktopia!

One of Australia’s most loved authors, Judy Nunn, came to Booktopia HQ to sign copies of her new book Spirits of the Ghan!

Judy signed A LOT of copies, but as she’s also one of Australia’s bestselling authors make sure you place your order now to secure your signed copy!


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Grab your signed copy of Spirits of the Ghan here!

Spirits of the Ghan

by Judy Nunn

spirits-of-the-ghanMaster storyteller Judy Nunn has now sold over 1 million books worldwide. In her spellbinding new bestseller she takes us on a breathtaking journey deep into the red heart of Australia.

It is 2001 and as the world charges into the new Millennium, a century-old dream is about to be realised in the Red Centre of Australia: the completion of the mighty Ghan railway, a long-lived vision to create the ‘backbone of the continent’, a line that will finally link Adelaide with the Top End.

But construction of the final leg between Alice Springs and Darwin will not be without its complications, for much of the desert it will cross is Aboriginal land … Read more.

GUEST BLOG: Lauren Kate talks about her 5th Fallen novel, Unforgiven.

UnforgivenMy first vision of Unforgiven came to me accompanied by music: a stunning redhead strums a lyre beside an ancient river, making up a song about a boy whose existence she only senses. The fierce dreaminess of the music makes it clear she was always already in love.

I didn’t know Lilith when I wrote her briefly into Passion, but I knew her affair with Cam had determined much of his fate. She was the key to understanding him. When I met her again in Unforgiven, three thousand years had passed, but she was still singing the same mesmerizing song. An electric guitar and synthesizer added new texture, a rock band was now backing her, but the lyrics and the melody hadn’t changed.

Her song is called “Exile,” though Cam will always know it as “Lilith’s Song.” The song is real, as is Cam and Lilith’s band Revenge.

I’ve long wanted to tell Cam’s side of the story. The love expressed through Revenge’s music makes the release of Unforgiven especially exciting. I hope the story thrills you, and that you listen to Revenge’s music with someone you always already loved.

Grab your copy of Unforgiven here!


Lauren Kate

Unforgiven“High school can be hell.”

Cam knows what it’s like to be haunted. He’s spent more time in Hell than any angel ever should. And his freshest Hell is high school, where Lilith, the girl he can’t stop loving, is serving out a punishment for his crimes.

Cam made a bet with Lucifer: he has fifteen days to convince the only girl who really matters to him to love him again. If he succeeds, Lilith will be allowed back into the world, and they can live their lives together. But if he fails . . . there’s a special place in Hell just for him. Tick-tock.

The long-awaited new novel in the global bestselling Fallen series.

Grab your copy of Unforgiven here!

Watch the Book Trailer:

Grab your copy of Unforgiven here!

About the Author

Lauren KateThe author of several pseudonymous novels for Alloy’s Inside Girl series, as well as The Betrayal of Natalie Hargrove, and the bestselling Fallen series, Lauren Kate grew up in Dallas, Texas. She received her Bachelor’s degree in the deep South at Emory University, then went to New York for a brief stint in publishing, before enrolling in the University of California’s Davis Master of Arts Creative Writing program. She finished her degree at UC Davis, where she also teaches. She lives and writes from an old farm house in Winters, California.

Visit Lauren Kate’s Booktopia author page

Remembrance Day: 10 Reads on the Costs of War

The one thing Australia and the Commonwealth should never forget is its history, in particular the sacrifices our ancestors made during World World 1 and in subsequent times of conflict.

Today, on Remembrance Day, we remember those that have fallen, sacrificing their very lives to provide a better life for us. The below ten books detail the horrors and costs of war, helping us never forget that behind every great victory is great loss.


Thin Red LineThe Thin Red Line
James Jones

‘Is it really worth it to die, to be dead, just to prove to everybody that you’re not a coward?’

On Guadalcanal in the south Pacific, the soldiers of C Company are about to enter the war. The men know they face their baptism of fire. But none know if they will be one of ‘the lucky ones’ to make it safely off the island. From Captain Stein, who feels like a father to his troops, and ‘Mad’ Sergeant Welsh, condemning all nations while swigging gin from his canteen, to Private Bell, who just wants to get home to his wife, they will discover the line that divides sanity from madness, and life from death …

Read more or grab your copy of The Thin Red Line here!

the-middle-parts-of-fortuneThe Middle Parts of Fortune
Frederic Manning

Bourne is a private fighting on the front. Self-reliant and articulate, he is under pressure to accept a commission, but he prefers to be among the ranks, drawn into the universal struggle for survival in a world gone mad. An attempt to understand the inexplicable, Manning’s moving and powerful work is unlike any other First World War novel in its depiction of the life of the ordinary British soldier, which was as much concerned with drill, transportation, rest and relaxation, as the trauma and brutalities of combat. Its use of swearing and its highly disturbing realism give The Middle Parts of Fortune a startling contemporaneity …


Read more or grab your copy of The Middle Parts of Fortune here!


All Quiet on the Western Front
Erich Maria Remarque

The most famous anti-war novel ever written.

One by one the boys begin to fall. In 1914 a room full of German schoolboys, fresh-faced and idealistic, are goaded by their schoolmaster to troop off to the ‘glorious war’. With the fire and patriotism of youth they sign up. What follows is the moving story of a young ‘unknown soldier’ experiencing the horror and disillusionment of life in the trenches …




Read more or grab your copy of All Quiet On The Western Front here!


parade-s-endParade’s End
Ford Madox Ford

Parade’s End is the great British war novel and Ford Madox Ford’s major achievement as a novelist. Originally published as four linked novels between 1924 and 1928, it follows the story of Christopher Tietjens, as his life is shattered by his wife’s infidelities and overturned by the mud, blood and destruction of the First World War. Tietjens, with his old-fashioned Tory values, is already out of step with the corrupt political culture of Edwardian England: his experiences at the Front and his developing relationship with the suffragette Valentine Wannop force him into a radical reconfiguring of his values as he participates in the …


Read more or grab your copy of Parade’s End here!

xthe-periodic-table.jpg.pagespeed.ic.RQrx3ox2YtThe Periodic Table
Primo Levi

‘So it happens, therefore, that every element says something to someone’

Inspired by the rhythms of the Periodic Table, Primo Levi assesses his life in terms of the chemical elements he associates with his past. From his birth into an Italian Jewish family through his training as a chemist, to the pain and darkness of the Holocaust and its aftermath, Levi reflects on the difficult course of his life in this heartfelt and deeply moving book.

Written with characteristically understated eloquence, The Periodic Table is one of the key testaments of the last century …


Read more or grab your copy of The Periodic Table here!


life-and-fateLife and Fate
Vasily Grossman

At the centre of this epic novel, overshadowing the lives of its huge cast of Russian and German characters, looms the battle of Stalingrad. Within a world torn apart by ideological tyranny and war, Grossman’s characters must work out their destinies.

Completed in 1960 but confiscated by the KGB, this sweeping panorama of Soviet Society rejected the compromises of a lifetime and earned its author denunciation and disgrace. It remained unpublished until it was smuggled into the West in 1980, where it was hailed as a masterpiece …


Read more or grab your copy of Life and Fate here!


Yellow Birds

The Yellow Birds
Kevin Powers

An unforgettable depiction of the psychological impact of war, by a young Iraq veteran and poet, The Yellow Birds is already being hailed as a modern classic.

A soldier’s broken promise … a mother’s loss … an agonizing truth. THE YELLOW BIRDS gives a powerful, emotional insight into the human cost of war – its impact on soldiers, their families, and most of all what it is like to return home, but never be able to leave the memories behind. Kevin Powers served two terms as a machine gunner with the US army in Iraq. On his return, he was asked one question more than any other …

Read more or grab your copy of The Yellow Birds here!



Karl Marlantes

Grey-green mountain jungle. Cold monsoon clouds wreath its mile-high summit, concealing a battery of 105-mm howitzers surrounded by deep bunkers, carefully constructed fields of fire and the 180 marines of Bravo Company.

Just three kilometres from Laos and two from North Vietnam, there is no more isolated outpost of America’s increasingly desperate war in Vietnam. Lieutenant Waino Mellas, 21 years old and just a few days into his 13-month tour, has barely arrived at Matterhorn before Bravo Company is ordered to abandon their mountain and sent deep in-country in pursuit of a North Vietnamese Army unit of unknown …

Read more or  grab your copy of Matterhorn here!


testament-of-youthTestament of Youth
Vera Brittain

A film tie-in edition of Vera Brittain’s classic autobiography, published to coincide with the major motion picture adaptation starring Dominic West, Emily Watson, Colin Morgan and Kit Harington.

In 1914 Vera Brittain was eighteen and, as war was declared, she was preparing to study at Oxford. Four years later her life – and the life of her whole generation – had changed in a way that was unimaginable in the tranquil pre-war era. Testament of Youth, one of the most famous autobiographies of the First World War, is Brittain’s account of how she survived the period; how she lost the man she loved …

Read more or grab your copy of Testament of Youth here!


for-whom-the-bell-tollsFor Whom The Bell Tolls
Ernest Hemingway

High in the pine forests of the Spanish Sierra, a guerrilla band prepares to blow up a vital bridge. Robert Jordan, a young American volunteer, has been sent to handle the dynamiting. There, in the mountains, he finds the dangers and the intense comradeship of war. And there he discovers Maria, a young woman who has escaped from Franco’s rebels.

For Whom The Bell Tolls is Ernest Hemingway’s finest novel, a passionate evocation of the pride and the tragedy of the Civil War that tore Spain apart …



Read more or grab your copy of For Whom the Bell Tolls here!

J.K. Rowling fans rejoice! Exciting news from the author of the Harry Potter series…

We’ve got some big news for you, so brace yourselves. We’re talking go grab a ventilator and have it at the ready brace yourselves. Or a paper bag. Yeah, a paper bag will do.

Alright, here it goes …

J.K. Rowling, author of the Harry Potter series has announced some very exciting news.  Got your paper bag at the ready? Breathe in … She’s announced that she’ll be writing a new children’s book!

J.K. Rowling

Whilst being interviewed by Simon Mayo at the Radio Two Book Club (in the UK), she mentioned that she’s writing another children’s book.

“I have an idea for a children’s book. Actually I have written part of a children’s book that I really love so I’m definitely going to finish that. And I have other ideas for other adult books”, she said. If it’s anything like the Harry Potter series, it’s sure to be a hit with both children and adults alike.

Asked whether she had other stories she wanted to publish: “Loads…I sometimes worry I’ll die before I’ve written them all out. That’s my mid-life crisis!”

Rowling also spoke about her ‘eighth story’ in the Harry Potter franchise – Harry Potter and the Cursed Child – which is set 19 years after Voldemort’s demise. She opted not to write it as a novel but as a screenplay for the West End.

She told Mayo: “I always said I’d never say never. There were things I had in my head about what happened 19 years later. I personally had no desire to write it as a novel, for reasons that I think will become clear when people see the play. I’ll just say that this play would never have happened if this particular team hadn’t come to me. They’re extraordinary and I think together we’ll create a really fantastic experience for people.”

Rowling hasn’t shared any specific details about her upcoming children’s book but we’ll keep you updated as soon as we learn anything!

View J.K. Rowling’s Booktopia author page

 HP illustratedHP colouring book

Nine naughty questions with… Trish Morey, author of upcoming Cherry Season

The Booktopia Book Guru asksCherry Season

Trish Morey

author of Cherry Season

Nine Naughty Questions

1. I wonder, is a Romance writer born or made? Please tell us little about your life before publication

I think, maybe a bit of both. I came to writing like so many of my colleagues, via a totally unrelated career. I was a mild-mannered chartered accountant before the writing bug bit hard and wouldn’t let go.

However as a teen I always fancied myself a writer (until talk of the real world and needing a “proper” job intervened).

(PS: I was kind of kidding about the mild-mannered bit…)

2. For all the glitz and the glam associated with the idea of Romance novels, writing about and from the heart is personal and very revealing. Do you think this is why Romance Readers are such devoted fans? And do you ever feel exposed?

A romance writer can’t just pay lip service to the emotions – romance readers will spot insincerity at fifty paces. So if you want to connect with your readers, you have to be prepared to pour yourself onto the page. Sure, sometimes it’s hard or confronting, but then, we’re not writing autobiography, we’re writing fiction. It’s about tapping into our experiences, our heartbreaks and highs, our joys and our grief, and putting the characters in that place instead.

Ultimately it’s not about you, the writer, and you have to be able to let that go.

3. Please tell us about your latest novel…

Cherry Season is a story about what happens when polar opposites attract. Dan Faraday is a 37 year old uptight third generation cherry orchardist with both age and an overblown sense of responsibility weighing down on his shoulders.

Lucy Marino is a 24 year old California girl backpacking her way around Australia and who gets a job picking cherries on the orchard, and immediately the two are at loggerheads.

It’s a story about spark, finding home and finding love where you least expect it. And it’s a book about cherries too, of course :)

4. Is the life of a published Romance writer… well… Romantic?

If ugg boots, too much coffee, screaming deadlines and mad hair 99% of the time is romantic, then sure.

But there are times you have to go to Santorini and watch a sunset, or visit a winery and learn how to dosage and disgorge a bottle of sparkling wine that you can later crack open and taste, all in the name of research.

So yeah, there are moments of sheer unadulterated romance that make up for that other mental 99% of the time.

5. Of all of the Romantic moments in your life is there one moment, more dear than all the rest, against which you judge all the Romantic elements in your writing? If so can you tell us about that special moment?

This is funny. Ever heard that expression “about as romantic as a road accident”? Well, that could have been coined for my hubby. Don’t get me wrong, he’s one amazing guy, but he’s not the most romantic man on the planet (which may or may not explain why I feel the need to make stuff up :) Then again, we’ve been married longer than twenty-seven years now and I’m crazier about him now than ever.

I figure if I can give my characters a taste of that kind of romance and a love that turns into a bone deep commitment, that means your characters are going to stick together whatever life hurls at them, then I’ve done my job.

Trish Morey6. Sex in Romance writing today ranges from ‘I can’t believe they’re allowed to publish this stuff’ explicit to ‘turn the light back on I can’t see a thing’ mild. How important do you think sex is in a Romance novel?

Sex is one part, and often a very important part, of any romantic relationship. But in romance, it’s not about the sex per se – it’s about the emotion, for without that, the sex is nothing more than a physical act that comes as no surprise to anyone.

Intimacy is a huge, risky step and takes courage and trust, because when our characters take off their clothes, they’re not only baring their bodies, they’re often baring their souls. Now they’ve got nothing to hide behind, and all sorts of secrets and fears and hang ups can be exposed, exposing the characters to all kinds of grief in the process.

I like to put my characters through the wringer in all kinds of ways. Sex is just one way.

7. Romance writers are often Romance readers – please tell us your five favourite (read and re-read) Romance Novels or five novels that influenced your work most?

It was a box of Mills & Boons from my Granny’s nursing home that I devoured when I was fifteen that made me want to be and believe I could be a writer – I so wish I’d taken note of the author names (back then I do believe I was much more interested in some much needed sex ed:-))

When I caught the bug again, it was Emma Darcy (love love love her Holly Christmas!), Miranda Lee (fabulous sex!) and Alison Kelly’s strong sexy stories that I loved. All our fabulous Downunder Sexy authors really, because that strong, confident voice resonated with me.

And then I discovered Jennifer Crusie and her full length contemporaries, like Welcome to Temptation and that leapt out and smacked me over the head and said, it’s okay, you can do sexy *and* funny.

So here I am now, writing sexy and funny and having a ball.

Emma DarcyMiranda Lee











8. Erotic Romance writing is ‘so hot right now’, do you have any thoughts on why?

Haha, could it be the sex, perchance? Writing has become much more graphic sexually over the last forty or fifty years, and men’s fiction has led the way. Women’s fiction is catching up. And now you can read on a Kindle or similar and nobody on the bus on the way to work knows what you’re reading – it’s liberating and discrete at the same time.

9. Lastly, what advice do you give aspiring writers?

To writers in general – just write. The more you write, the better you’ll get. And don’t believe it when people tell you that you have to write a certain way. Just write the story, and sort the rest out later.

To romance writers in particular – all of the above – and join Romance Writers of Australia if you are serious about pursuing a career in romance writing.

Trish, thank you for playing!

Pre-Order your copy of Cherry Season here!

Cherry Season

Trish Morey Cherry Season

Dan Faraday is too busy for love. With the long hours running the family orchard, he doesn’t have time to go on dates, and if he did, he would be looking for someone who fits into his ten-year plan. Someone traditional, reliable and dependable – someone just like him.

Someone the total opposite of beautiful drifter Lucy Marino. A free spirit who chases the moment, she’s in town for the fruit-picking season. The only certain thing in her life is constant change and while she’s tempted to see how cute Dan might be if only he smiled, she’s not the type of girl to wait around.

But as the cherry trees blossom, Lucy and Dan are increasingly drawn … Read more.

Pre-Order your copy of Cherry Season here!


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