Full List of 2013 Booktoberfest Prize Winners

WEEKLY PRIZE DRAW WINNERS -
CONGRATULATIONS TO:

Booktopia Weekly Prize Draw :

$250 Booktopia Gift Certificate


Week 1 Winner: T. Davis, Churchill, VIC


Week 2 Winner: A. McKinnon, Penshurst, NSW


Week 3 Winner: G, Thomas, Glengarry, VIC


Week 4 Winner: R. Courtney,  Wollstonecraft, NSW


AllenUnwin1102013

Allen & Unwin Prize

A collection of 20 gorgeous books, including new fiction, non fiction and children’s books

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K. Thompson, Arundel, QLD


bloomsbury1102013

Bloomsbury Prize

Ten brand new books worth nearly $300

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C. Macmillan, Armadale, VIC


fivemilepress1102013

The Five Mile Press Prize

The entire Five Mile Press Booktoberfest Showcase worth over $500!
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P. Smith, Wavell Heights, QLD


Hachette1102013

Hachette Australia Prize

The entire Hachette Australia Booktoberfest Showcase worth over $700
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L. Shepherd, Caboolture, QLD


HachetteChildren1102013

Hachette Children’s Books Prizes

Ten Read and Play for Active Toddlers Packs Packs
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- J, Menzies, Ulladulla, NSW
– T. Atkinson, Summerhill, TAS
– J. Lightfoot, Swanbourne, WA
– D. Wilcock, Wyee Point, NSW
– B. Lee, Alfredton, Vic
– K. Ramsey, Gordon, NSW
– R. Armstrong, Yarrawarrah, NSW
– R. Durack. Bateman, WA
– C. Bell, Kotara Fair, NSW
– S. K. Yeom, Burwood, NSW


hardiegrant1102013

Hardie Grants Books Prize

The entire Hardie Grant Booktoberfest Showcase
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K. Owen, Ascot Vale, VIC


harlequin1102013

Harlequin Prize

One of six Rural Romance Prize Packs valued at $120!
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- J. Lord, Cranbrook, QLD
– C. Burke, Silverdale, NSW
– M. Sadler, Spring Ridge, NSW
-M. Devellerez, Nollamara, WA
– H. Layt, Molendinar, QLD
– S. Single, Moree, NSW


harpercollins1102013

HarperCollins Prize

The entire Harper Collins Booktoberfest Showcase worth over $950!
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- M. Prescott, Sinnamon Park, QLD


lonelyplanet1102013

Lonely Planet Prize

A Crumpler luggage pack valued at $530!
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- S. Calder, Morayfield, QLD


macmillan1102013

Pan Macmillan Australia Prize

The entire Pan Macmillan Australia Booktoberfest Showcase valued at almost $700
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- H. Wills, Turramurra, NSW


MurdochBooks1102013

Murdoch Books Prize

A collection of 14 gorgeous books, including lavish cooking, incredible gardening and magnificent lifestyle titles worth over $650!
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- L. Priest, Surrey Hills, VIC


Penguin1102013

Penguin Books Australia Prize

The entire Penguin Books Australia Booktoberfest Showcase worth over $950
Penguin20102013

- A. Harris, Williamstown, VIC


RandomHouseAustralia1102013

Random House Prize

The entire Random House Booktoberfest Showcase worth over $800
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- M. Lum-Brown, Drummoyne, NSW


SimonSchuster1102013

Simon & Schuster Australia Prize

An amazing book prize pack worth over $950
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L. Maloney, Sydney, NSW


textpublishing1102013

Text Publishing Prize

The entire Text Publishing Booktoberfest Showcase worth over $600.00!
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K. Rice, Mudgee, NSW


WalkerBooks1102013

Walker Books Prize

The entire Walker Books Booktoberfest Showcase worth over $350!
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P. Robinson, Wadeye, NT


wiley1102013

Wiley Prize

A great collection of smart Business reads, top holiday gadget guides and beautiful books worth over $500!
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- G. Underwood, Gawler, SA


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Woodslane Prize

A $300 book voucher for the purchase  of any Woodslane publications and a $200 voucher for the purchase of any Ken Duncan products.
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Alana Smith, Clarkson, WA


Please note: all winners will be contacted soon via email.

Thanks to all the publishers who contributed to this year’s Booktoberfest.

Tom Keneally chats with John Purcell about his new book Shame and the Captives

John Purcell reviews Shame and the Captives by Tom Keneally

One of the drawbacks of living in a society obsessed with the new is that we fail to recognise the simple fact that many things get better with time. There is just no story in ‘Author Gains Wisdom by Living a Long Interesting Life:  Talking, Travelling, Reading and Writing’. But there should be. Someone gaining wisdom should be news. It so seldom happens.

Tom Keneally should be news. His last two books are a direct challenge to the more newsworthy overnight success authors. Both are the result of fifty years of writing both fiction and non-fiction. And it shows. Both Daughters of Mars and his latest novel Shame and the Captives give younger writers a lesson in writing.

At its most basic, Shame and the Captives is a retelling of the Cowra breakout. Something which was long overdue. But it is much more than that. Keneally cleverly (and effortlessly) divides his story into many sub stories and embeds his reader into each one. We mingle with Japanese POWs, hear their stories, feel their shame and share their frustrations; we are sent out to the farms as labourers with the Italian POWs; we wait out the war far from the frontlines with the British and Australian camp guards and officers; we share in the guilt and confusion of a woman who’s trying to remember her captured husband’s face whilst an attractive Italian POW labours away for her father-in-law in the sun outside her window.

All the while trouble brews. We know the story of the Cowra breakout. We have never had it told like this.

Click here for more about Shame and the Captives

This is a Booktoberfest title. Buy this book now to go in the draw to win Booktopia’s weekly giveaway – a $250 Booktopia voucher – AND order by 31st October 2013 to go in the draw to win the fantastic publisher prize.

Click here to see the full Random House Showcase

REVIEW: Undisputed Truth by Mike Tyson (review by Andrew Cattanach)

I’ll let you behind the curtain of having the best job in the world. Publishers are awesome, and very generous. So when a book comes along that excites and surprises a publisher, so much so that we only get to look at a quick teaser before release instead of the entire book, we tend to take notice.

Mike Tyson’s autobiography Undisputed Truth is one of those books.

As the sports nerd in the office I came in one day to find a sampler of Undisputed Truth on my desk. I flicked through it and expected a pretty watered down version of events, a fallen star trying to dig himself out of trouble with a ghostwriter and PR manager at hand.

What I got blew my socks off. This is Mike Tyson, leaving his support staff at the door. A naive street kid who had it all and then threw it all away. He lays it all down, every thought, every feeling, every emotion. At 23 he was hailed as possibly the greatest fighter to ever live, married to a movie star, earning millions of dollars for fights that rarely went past the first round. By 24 he was broke, in jail and a worldwide disgrace. He writes of his sentencing that “it took me a long time to realise that that little white woman judge who sent me to prison just might have saved my life.”

It’s difficult to decide whether this is a story of ‘how did it all go wrong’ so much as ‘how did it all go right’, if only in his early days. He was raised as a gang member, a fat kid with a lisp who tried to stay quiet and not get hurt. How did he become a national celebrity, and what happened when he discovered the only thing that knocked him off his perch was himself?

Undisputed Truth isn’t so much a story about Tyson as a story of a world of scatter gun celebrity worship. A study in what happens when the music stops but the camera keeps rolling.

A book like this doesn’t come around very often. Don’t miss out.

Click here for more about Undisputed Truth by Mike Tyson

A lesson in performing Space Oddity. In Space.

Chris Hadfield has nearly done it all as an astronaut. During this time he has broken into a Space Station with a Swiss army knife, disposed of a live snake while piloting a plane, and been temporarily blinded while clinging to the exterior of an orbiting spacecraft.

The secret to Col. Hadfield’s success –  and survival –  is an unconventional philosophy he learned at NASA: prepare for the worst – and enjoy every moment of it.

Despite all this Chris Hadfield is probably best known for this.
It is awesome. You must watch.

Colonel Chris Hadfield has spent decades training as an astronaut and has logged nearly 4,000 hours in space. In An Astronaut’s Guide to Life on Earth, Col. Hadfield takes readers deep into his years of training and space exploration to show how to make the impossible possible.

Through eye-opening, entertaining stories filled with the adrenaline of launch, the mesmerizing wonder of spacewalks and the measured, calm responses mandated by crises, he explains how conventional wisdom can get in the way of achievement – and happiness.

His own extraordinary education in space has taught him some counterintuitive lessons: don’t visualize success, do care what others think, and always sweat the small stuff. You might never be able to build a robot, pilot a spacecraft, make a music video or perform basic surgery in zero gravity like Col. Hadfield. But his vivid and refreshing insights will teach you how to think like an astronaut, and will change, completely, the way you view life on Earth – especially your own.

Click here for more about An Astronaut’s Guide to Life on Earth

Chris Hafield’s An Astronaut’s Guide to Life on Earth is a Booktoberfest title. Buy this book now to go in the draw to win Booktopia’s weekly giveaway – a $250 Booktopia voucher – AND order by 31st October 2013 to go in the draw to win the fantastic publisher prize.

Click here for prize details and to see the full Pan Macmillan Showcase

Jeff Kinney, author of Diary of a Wimpy Kid, answers Ten Terrifying Questions

The Booktopia Book Guru asks

Jeff Kinney

author of the Diary of a Wimpy Kid series

Ten Terrifying Questions

 ———————-

1. To begin with why don’t you tell us a little bit about yourself – where were you born? Raised? Schooled?

I was born and raised in Maryland in a suburb about ten miles south of Washington, D.C.

2. What did you want to be when you were twelve, eighteen and thirty? And why?

When I was 12, I wanted to be a computer game designer. We owned one of the first personal computers, an Apple IIe, and it set my course in life. When I was 18, I still wanted to be a game designer, but I was interested in computer graphics as well. When I was thirty, I actually was a game designer, but I wanted to be a cartoonist as well. Now I’m both… a game designer by day, cartoonist by night.

3. What strongly held belief did you have at eighteen that you do not have now?

I feel that my beliefs now are more or less consistent with my beliefs back then. That means I’m either admirably consistent or I’m suffering from a case of arrested development.

4. What were three works of art – book or painting or piece of music, etc – you can now say, had a great effect on you and influenced your own development as a writer?

Tales of a Fourth Grade Nothing by Judy Blume. Without the hapless Peter Hatcher, I’m not sure there would’ve been a Greg Heffley. Likewise with Charlie Brown of Peanuts fame… I think every cartoonist working today owes a debt of gratitude to Charles Schultz for his influence on modern comic strips. Finally, Bob Dylan’s Brownsville Girl… Dylan is the master of lyrical economy, which is what cartoonists strive for.

5. Considering the innumerable artistic avenues open to you, why did you choose to write a novel?

I backed into it. I wanted to be a newspaper cartoonist, but I couldn’t get past the gatekeepers. So I took a different tact and put my comics in books.

6. Please tell us about your novel.

Diary of a Wimpy Kid: Hard Luck follows the plight of pre-adolescent Greg Heffley, who finds himself friendless and needing to navigate the perils of school on his own.

Publisher’s blurb:

Greg Heffley’s on a losing streak. His best friend, Rowley Jefferson, has ditched him, and finding new friends in middle school is proving to be a tough task. To change his fortunes, Greg decides to take a leap of faith and turn his decisions over to chance. Will a roll of the dice turn things around, or is Greg’s life destined to be just another hard-luck story?

7. What do you hope people take away with them after reading your work?

I hope they laugh, and I hope they’ll read the book again.

8. Whom do you most admire in the realm of writing and why?

I most admire Bob Dylan for being able to evoke a whole story with just a few words.

9. Many artists set themselves very ambitious goals. What are yours?

My goal is to stick around and have some sort of relevancy after Diary of a Wimpy Kid is over.

10. What advice do you give aspiring writers?

My advice to aspiring writers is to take an idea and nurture it to fruition rather than just put your first effort out there. It’s tempting to write something, then see if it sticks. But writing is like any discipline, and to become an expert, you need years to master it. I worked on Wimpy Kid for eight years before I was ready to share it with the world.

Jeff, thank you for playing

Jeff Kinney’s Diary of a Wimpy Kid: Hard Luck is a Booktoberfest title. Buy it now to go in the draw to win Booktopia’s weekly giveaway – a $250 Booktopia voucher – AND order by 31st October 2013 to go in the draw to win the fantastic publisher prize.

Click here for prize details and to see the full Penguin Showcase

Diary of a Wimpy Kid:
Hard Luck

by Jeff Kinney

Jeff Kinney’s 8th book of this hilarious and highly successful series, and Greg Heffley and his friends now have a whole new set of adventures.

Greg Heffley’s on a losing streak. His best friend, Rowley Jefferson, has ditched him, and finding new friends in middle school is proving to be a tough task.

To change his fortunes, Greg decides to take a leap of faith and turn his decisions over to chance.

Will a roll of the dice turn things around, or is Greg’s life destined to be just another hard-luck story?

Click here for more about Diary of a Wimpy Kid : Hard Luck

Are You A Booktoberfest Prize Winner for Week 4?

WEEKLY PRIZE DRAW WINNERS –
CONGRATULATIONS TO:

Booktopia Weekly Prize Draw :

$250 Booktopia Gift Certificate


Week 1 Winner: T. Davis, Churchill, VIC


Week 2 Winner: A. McKinnon, Penshurst, NSW.


Week 3 Winner: G, Thomas, Glengarry, VIC


Week 4 Winner: R. Courtney,  Wollstonecraft, NSW


Are You A Booktoberfest Prize Winner?

Booktopia’s Booktoberfest is a month-long celebration of books, their authors, their publishers and you, the readers! We have competitions, offers, prizes, exclusive content, giveaways and lots of other goodies for you throughout the month of October.

Place an order with Booktopia before the 31st of October 2013 and go in the weekly draw to win a $250 Booktopia Voucher!

WEEKLY PRIZE DRAW WINNERS –
CONGRATULATIONS TO:

Booktopia Weekly Prize Draw :

$250 Booktopia Gift Certificate


Week 1 Winner:  T. Davis, Churchill, VIC


Week 2 Winner: A. McKinnon, Penshurst, NSW.


Click here to start celebrating Booktoberfest with Booktopia,
Australia’s Local Bookstore

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