Q&A with Patrick Ness about his latest novel – The Rest of Us Just Live Here.

The Rest of Us Just Live Here 1. The premise for your latest book is a really refreshing new take on a familiar theme. Can you tell us a bit about how you first got the idea to write The Rest of Us Just Live Here?

The Chosen One plot is so important to YA, and for good reason: it provides an explanation for the incredible loneliness and alienation that teenage life brings. It’s powerful, and I’d never want to lose it. HOWEVER, I started thinking about all those young readers out there who never even think they’d be Katniss or Harry Potter. I wondered what their stories would be like. The answer, of course, is: just as interesting.

2. The “Main Plot” of the book is a hilarious parody of YA clichés. Did you ever find it difficult navigating the fine line between parody and mockery?

Not really because I love YA, for its smarts, its robustness, its great welcoming nature. If you love something, I don’t think you have to worry too much about mocking it in a nasty way. I did it with love, and people have been responding really well! Make no mistake, I’ll defend YA to the death.

3. If you had to pick a favourite “Chosen One” character from a book/film/TV show or graphic novel who would it be and why?

Buffy. Buffy, Buffy, Buffy. The greatest Chosen One there ever was or will be. Powerful but human, serious but funny. Buffy is the greatest YA creation ever. I want all my nieces and nephews to have her as a role model.

4. Why do you think people are so endlessly fascinated by stories about high school teens banding together toPatrick Ness fight a supernatural evil and save the world in time for the Prom?

I’ve always argued that all supernatural AND dystopian plotlines in YA are, in fact, actually about high school. They’re all allegorical to how it feels: that every problem feels like (and is) the end of the world, that your friends are the only ones who understand, etc. I don’t think they’re supernatural at all, really. They’re one tiny step beyond documentary.

5. Would you rather be a hero, a sidekick, a villain or none of the above? What do you think makes someone a true hero?

Eh, it’s hard enough to be a decent human. It’s also heroic enough. My life philosophy is, “Just do your best and try not to be a dick.” Trust me, in this world, that’s bloody heroism, that is.

Grab a copy of Patrick Ness’ new novel The Rest of Us Just Live Here

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The Rest of Us Just Live HereThe Rest of Us Just Live Here.
by Patrick Ness

Award-winning writer Patrick Ness’s bold and irreverent novel powerfully asks what if you weren’t the Chosen One? The one who’s supposed to fight the zombies, or the soul-eating ghosts, or whatever this new thing is, with the blue lights and the death?

What if you were like Mikey? Who just wants to graduate and go to prom and maybe finally work up the courage to ask Henna out before someone goes and blows up the high school.

Again. Because sometimes there are problems bigger than this week’s end of the world and sometimes you just have to find the extraordinary in your ordinary life. Even if your best friend might just be the God of mountain lions…An exceptional novel from the author praised by John Green as “an insanely beautiful writer”.

Patrick Ness is the author of the critically acclaimed and best-selling Chaos Walking trilogy, as well as the Carnegie Medal winning A Monster Calls, inspired by an idea from Siobhan Dowd. Among the numerous awards he has received are the Guardian Children’s Fiction Prize, the Booktrust Teenage Prize, and the Costa Children’s Book Award.

Grab a copy of Patrick Ness’ new novel The Rest of Us Just Live Here

Major Prize Announcements!

9781782394860_Wild_Large_Promo_Banner

Critically acclaimed New York Times bestselling memoir Wild by Cheryl Strayed had such a significant literary impact that it made its way onto the big screen. Jean-Marc Vallée, famous for Dallas Buyers Club, directed the movie starring Reese Witherspoon and Laura Dern, who both went on to be nominated for an Academy Award. To promote the release of this powerfully moving film on DVD we gave 20 Booktopian’s the chance to win a copy. All you had to do to enter was order the film tie-in edition by June 30th.

…and the winners are:

K.Rankin, Seville, VIC,  B.O’Leary, Lake Illawarra, NSW, M.Edgar, Wollongong, NSW, B.Boehner, Marsden Park, NSW, L.Furney, Coniston, NSW, Z.Morrell, Petersham, NSW, E.Lockwood, Sellicks Beach, SA, J.Deane, Asquith, NSW, S.Kania, Newtown, VIC, T.Cemo,    Thornlands, QLD, C.Zhang, Melbourne, VIC, J.Dizdarevic, Ascot Vale, VIC, S.Laird, Tenambit, NSW
R.Torrisi, Stanthorpe, QLDU, D. Bates, Cordeaux Heights, NSW, K.Flanagan, Blackmans Bay, TAS, C.Okeefe, Corio, VIC, J.Craghill, Craigieburn, VIC, L.Guan, Sydney, NSW, R.Snape, Bunbury, WA

wildWild

A Journey from Lost to Found

by Cheryl Strayed

At twenty-six, Cheryl Strayed thought she had lost everything. In the wake of her mother’s rapid death from cancer, her family disbanded and her marriage crumbled. With nothing to lose, she made the most impulsive decision of her life: to walk eleven-hundred miles of the west coast of America – from the Mojave Desert, through California and Oregon, and into Washington state – and to do it alone. She had no experience of long-distance hiking and the journey was nothing more than a line on a map. But it held a promise – a promise of piecing together a life that lay in ruins at her feet.

Grab a copy of Wild here


Peppa_Pig_Competition_Promo_Large

Peppa-Pig-Prize-Pack-15052015

Because our little pink piggy friend is still number 1# rated kids show on ABC 2 I-View we thought we might give fans out there the chance to win a pack dedicated to the awesome Pig herself. All you had to do to enter was order any title from our Penguin Peppa Pig series by June 30th.

…and the winner is:

J.Annetts, Wahroonga, NSW

Check out the entire Penguin Peppa Pig series here


9781460750568_Paper_Towns_Large_Promo_Banner_17062015

After the runaway success of the film adaptation of John Green’s The Fault in Our Stars another of his novels, Paper Towns, is about the hit the big screen. To celebrate this, we gave 2 Booktopian’s the chance to attend the Australian Premiere! All you had to do to enter was order our Paper Towns: Film Tie-in Edition by June 28th.

Are you feeling lucky, punk? Drumroll please…

I.Abbott, Woodford, NSW
M.Abrahams, Oakville, NSW

paper-towns-order-now-for-your-chance-to-win-Paper Towns

Film Tie-in Edition

John Green

The stunning film tie-in edition of Paper Towns, from the award-winning author of Looking for Alaska and The Fault in Our Stars.

Quentin Jacobsen – Q to his friends – is eighteen and has always loved the edgy Margo Roth Spiegelman. As children, they’d discovered a dead body together. Now at high school, Q’s nerdy while Margo is uber-cool. One night, Q is basking in the predictable boringness of his life when Margo, dressed as a ninja, persuades him to partake in several hours of mayhem. then she vanishes.

While her family more…


Congratulations to the winners!
Missed out on the prize? Hey, turn that frown upside up, we’ve got so much more up for grabs, not to mention limited editions, signed copies and 2 for 1 offers!

Head to our Promotions and Competitions page!

promotions

Find out how you could win tickets to the Paper Towns Australian premiere!

Do you love John Green novels?

Do you love sweeping films about first loves and losses?

Do you love rubbing shoulders with celebrities?

Are you feeling lucky, punk?

After the runaway success of the film adaptation of John Green’s The Fault in Our Stars another of his novels, Paper Towns, is about the hit the big screen.

To celebrate this, we have 2 double passes to the Australian Premiere on July 5th in Sydney!

For your chance to win one of them, just buy the stunning Paper Towns: Film Tie-in edition by June 28th!

9781460750568_Paper_Towns_Homepage_Banner

paper-towns-order-now-for-your-chance-to-win-Paper Towns

Film Tie-in Edition

John Green

The stunning film tie-in edition of Paper Towns, from the award-winning author of Looking for Alaska and The Fault in Our Stars.

Quentin Jacobsen – Q to his friends – is eighteen and has always loved the edgy Margo Roth Spiegelman. As children, they’d discovered a dead body together. Now at high school, Q’s nerdy while Margo is uber-cool. One night, Q is basking in the predictable boringness of his life when Margo, dressed as a ninja, persuades him to partake in several hours of mayhem. then she vanishes.

While her family more…


We’ve got so much more up for grabs, not to mention limited editions, signed copies and 2 for 1 offers!
Head to our Promotions and Competitions page!

promotions

GUEST BLOG: Rebecca Dinerstein on her journey from a city girl to a mountain girl

Author: Rebecca Dinerstein

People often ask me if it was weird to grow up in Manhattan, to take the subway to school, to trade in backyards and bicycles for sidewalks and Razor scooters. It wasn’t weird. It was the only thing I knew—growing up in New York felt like the only way anyone could grow up. I couldn’t imagine driving to the grocery store, or driving anywhere for that matter—I still don’t know how to drive. Or ride a bike. I considered myself a city girl, through and through.

Until, that is, I left the city for the least-city-like place on earth: the Norwegian Arctic. I’d received a poetry fellowship from my university, and when I graduated I was able to spend a year, writing poems, anywhere. The fellowship committee warned me: don’t spend your year in New York. You’ll waste your time, your money, your energy. I wanted to go somewhere rare, somewhere gorgeous, somewhere I’d never been before. I wanted to work hard, and to spend the year writing—not socializing, or studying, or any of the things I’d done throughout the eighteen years of school that I’d just completed.

I decided to go North. I’d spent two summers in Ireland studying Irish literature, and loved the feeling of being high up on the planet. I loved the mist, the gray weather that parted to reveal bright light, the sheep, the stone walls, the Celtic and Viking histories, the ancient language. I thought I would find more of that richness if I ventured further in that direction. So I picked Scandinavia, and let chance take it from there.

A professor of mine had been on vacation in Norway, and on a mountaintop he’d met an elderly couple. The couple had a son who had an uncle who lived in the Arctic. My professor suggested I get in touch with the family. And soon after graduation, I found myself at the family’s summer cabin: on a rock, in a fjord, off the southeastern coast of Norway, a few hours south of Oslo. From there, I traced the length of the country upward until I reached what seemed to be the end of the earth: the arctic Lofoten Islands.

I’d found somewhere rare, somewhere gorgeous. My destination had kept up its side of the bargain, so it was time for me to keep mine: I buckled down and wrote as much as I could. I wrote many poems—a collection called Lofoten that was eventually published in a bilingual English-Norwegian edition—but also the first draft of what became The Sunlit Night, my debut novel, a book I am immensely excited and proud to release this summer.

It took a long journey to teach me that a city girl can also be a mountain girl, can also be a fjord girl, a farm girl, an all-over-the-place kind of person. When I returned to New York, after almost three years in Norway (I found it difficult to leave), I was delighted to reunite with pizza slices and poppy seed bagels. But I missed Norwegian brown cheese, and the sight of wildflowers out my window. I’d been augmented by that new landscape—I had learned to love even more of the world. New York is no longer the only place I feel comfortable. I will feel at home, and not too lonely, anywhere the earth is vibrant enough to keep me company. And anywhere I feel at home, I will write.


the-sunlit-nightThe Sunlit Night

by Rebecca Dinerstein

Shortly after her college graduation, Frances flees a painful breakup and her claustrophobic childhood home in Manhattan, which has become more airless in the aftermath of two family announcements: her parents’ divorce and her younger sister’s engagement.

She seeks refuge at a Norwegian artist colony that’s offered her a painting apprenticeship. Unfortunately, she finds only one artist living there: Alf, an enigmatic middle-aged descendant of the Sami reindeer hunters who specialises in the colour yellow…

Yasha, an eighteen-year-old Russian immigrant raised in a bakery in Brighton Beach, is kneading bread in the shop’s window when he sees his mother for the first time in a decade. As he gains a selfish and unreliable parent, he loses his beloved father. He must carry out his father’s last wish to be buried ‘at the top of the world’ and reconcile with the charismatic woman who abandoned them both…And so Frances’s and Yasha’s paths intersect in Lofoten, a string of five islands ninety-five miles above the Arctic Circle.

Their unlikely connection and growing romance fortifies them against the turmoil of their distant homes, and teaches them that to be alone is not always to be lonely, and that love and independence are not mutually exclusive.

Grab a copy of The Sunlit Night here

GUEST BLOG: Who’s that Knocking at the Door? by Jandy Nelson

Writing is a socially accepted form of schizophrenia.—E.L. Doctorow
Some people say life is the thing, but I prefer reading.—Logan Pearsall Smith

Jandy Nelson

Author: Jandy Nelson

It is essential when writing fiction to enter the world of your characters.
But what if they begin to enter yours?

The first time this happened was with Guillermo Garcia, Jude’s sculpture teacher in I’ll Give You the Sun. Guillermo is a tall, imposing man with over-sized features that all clutter together in a wildly expressive face. He has a booming voice with a strong accent (he’s Colombian), a big heart and bigger personality. He carves abstract giants out of granite, and really, at least in my mind, he’s kind of a giant himself. He was one of the first characters in the story to arrive and he did so fully formed and ready to go.

One day, about two years into the writing of the novel, I was having a desperate moment. I felt uncertain about the direction the story was heading and the themes at play just didn’t feel like the right ones. So I lay down to think (much easier for me to think when I’m horizontal—no idea why). The next thing I knew, there was Guillermo towering before me: hands in the air like he was conducting a symphony, hair in his eyes, sweat dripping down his neck (it was that real). “Jandy! You are an idiot!” he said in his big bang of a voice. “You are thinking about this wrong. This is a book about second chances! Second chances. Understand?” I bolted upright. Because I did understand. He was right. It was the exact revelation I needed in that moment except for the fact that it had come out of the seemingly real mouth of an imaginary person! (Even if I fell asleep—indeed possible—it’s still bizarre to see and hear someone in a dream in such detail, someone you’ve never laid eyes on, someone who does not exist.)

Next, months later, I went by myself to see a Richard Diebenkorn exhibit. I walked in and my heart immediately exploded at the beauty. Like Jude says in Sun, there are paintings that color-flood9781406354386 out of two dimensions into three. These were those kind of paintings and my first thought was: “It’s such a shame Noah and Jude couldn’t come with me today.” In that split-second, I’d forgotten that they weren’t real.

I also remember a strange moment while in the middle of writing The Sky Is Everywhere. I was driving to work and reached for my phone because I was feeling an over-powering urge to call my novel. Then I realized what I’d just thought (!!!) and put the phone down.

I’ve had experiences like this as a reader and filmgoer too, with other people’s characters and stories. And maybe it’s a little nuts, but I don’t care. I love that as writers and readers, as story-lovers and fans, we, at times, immerse ourselves so completely in imaginary worlds that characters from those imaginary worlds come knocking on our very real wooden front doors. I love that the mind is that boundless and mysterious and strange, that the bridge between the real and the imagined is so well-travelled, and in both directions.


i-ll-give-you-the-sunI’ll Give You the Sun

by Jandy Neson

From the critically acclaimed author of The Sky Is Everywhere, a radiant novel that will leave you laughing and crying – all at once. For fans of John Green, Gayle Forman and Lauren Oliver.

Jude and her twin Noah were incredibly close – until a tragedy drove them apart, and now they are barely speaking. Then Jude meets a cocky, broken, beautiful boy as well as a captivating new mentor, both of whom may just need her as much as she needs them. What the twins don’t realize is that each of them has only half the story and if they can just find their way back to one another, they have a chance to remake their world.

About the Author

Jandy Nelson lives in San Francisco, where she divides her time between her proper tree and running loose through the park. Jandy is a literary agent, published poet and perpetual academic with degrees from Brown, Cornell and Vermont College of Fine Arts. She’s a superstitious sort and devout romantic who’s madly in love with California – how it teeters on the edge of a continent.

Grab a copy of I’ll Give You the Sun here

Sally Gardner, author of The Door That Lead to Where, answers Ten Terrifying Questions

The Booktopia Book Guru asks

Sally Gardner

author of The Door That Lead to Where

Ten Terrifying Questions
____________

1. To begin with why don’t you tell us a little bit about yourself – where were you born? Raised? Schooled?

I was born in Birmingham, raised in London and went to quite a few schools due to the fact I was dyslexic. It’s one part of life I have no regrets about leaving. I remember it exceedingly well and didn’t like being a child. We’re all brought up by giants, some more monstrous than others. In the end we become giants and the art is not to forget what it felt like to live under them.

2. What did you want to be when you were twelve, eighteen and thirty? And why?

We all have dreams. We have dreams that our parents put on us when we are young, we have conventional dreams that we think we should have, and then we have the main dream, the thing we really want to do, which we sort of know from the beginning. What I told people at the age of twelve was that I wanted to be an artist. At eighteen, I told people I wanted to go to theatre school, and be the best set designer in the country. What I wanted to be at thirty was a children’s illustrator, and what I never told a soul ever, was my main dream, and that was to be a writer and tell my stories.

3. What strongly held belief did you have at eighteen that you do not have now?

Sally Gardner, June 24, 2013.

Author: Sally Gardner

That I would find the love of my life. I didn’t, but I did have three wonderful children and other amazing things have happened to me, but the love of my life never appeared. Maybe it did in a way in the sense that it is now writing.

4. What were three works of art – book, painting, piece of music, etc – you can now say, had a great effect on you and influenced your own development as a writer?

Edith Sitwell’s Facade. I first heard it with my father in his study and I just adored the jamboree of words, the jumble of sounds, and the joy of language. Mixed with William Walton’s music I thought it was absolutely fabulous. I think a book that had a profound effect on me was The Lost Domain by Alain Fournier. It is a coming-of-age story, is completely magical, and is a book that made me want to be a child again just so that I could read it for the first time again. The illustrator and writer who had a profound effect was Edward Gorey. I discovered him when I was 16 and that love has never waned.

5. Considering the innumerable artistic avenues open to you, why did you choose to write a novel? 

They weren’t necessarily open to me. I am severely dyslexic and to this day people find the idea of writers being dyslexic a contradiction. I was very artistic though, and went into theatre mainly because I love story. I couldn’t imagine working without a story. I was very lucky to have been taken to the theatre a great deal when I was younger and I had a huge love of the theatre. When I went into illustration, I still thought the main dream I had to be a writer was impossible and I would never achieve it.

6. Please tell us about your novel, The Door That Led to Where

I always start a book with a question, even if it’s just to myself. The question I asked was: Would three boys, who I would call ‘Govian failures’ after our ex-education minister Michael Gove, fare better if they went back to 1830s England, than they would do here in the present? I was thinking about a particular lad who had been educated from age three to five, and then again from fifteen to seventeen, who was mainly self taught. He wanted to be a correspondent at the Houses of Parliament, and I was wondering if he stood a chance of getting a job at, say, The Times. Would they even let him though the front door? The resounding answer was no, they wouldn’t. That young man happened to be Charles Dickens. Where are they young men of today who are the future Dickenses, and are we over looking them in favour of a tick-box education? In London particularly boys at the age of seventeen are either mummified or villainised. The one thing they’re not seen as is young men. I think we make a terrible mistake in doing this. We leave too many pathways open for fanaticism, radicalisation and anything that would give a young man a sense of power and respect.

Grab a copy of Sally’s new book The Door That Led to Where here

7. What do you hope people take away with them after reading your work?

I always hope that if my work does anything it encourages people to ask questions, to think a bit more about where we are going. If it does that I feel I have achieved quite a lot.

8. Whom do you most admire in the realm of writing and why?

I absolutely adore Angela Carter, I love magical surrealism in all its formats. And I would have to say the book that’s been my bible has been the Grimms’ Fariy Tales. I think basically all my stories are fairy tales. The other writer that I stand in awe of is Charles Dickens.

9. Many artists set themselves very ambitious goals. What are yours?on-writing

My goals are to have good, original ideas, and try and stay true to the world novel, which in the 18th century meant something new and unexpected; a novelty. I still think my ambition is to have original ideas and thoughts and to play as much with language as I can. As well as the vague hope that one day I might win the Carnegie Medal, which I am absolutely over the moon to have done.

10. What advice do you give aspiring writers?

My main advice is to not get published too young. There is a horrifying trend at the moment of finding two year olds who are trying to write Proust. I would encourage everyone to grow up, work on their ideas and publish them a little later. When people ask me about how to become a writer, I always suggest that they read Stephen King’s On Writing. It is one of the best books he ever wrote, and is also a very true and direct story about being an author and what that might entail. I also think you need to read a great deal, and try not to use the word ‘like’, if you can help it. I have a slight aversion to ‘like’. If I read a book and in the first paragraph there is a ‘like’, I think to myself, can I manage another 300 pages? I think that a ‘like’ asks you to stand outside the story, when you should feel like you are all the way inside it. The other thing I feel very strongly about is that you don’t need an adjective with ‘said’. Whatever is being said has to hold all the power.

Sally, thank you for playing.

Grab a copy of The Door That Led to Where here


The Door That Led to Where

by Sally Gardner

When the present offers no hope for the future, the answers may lie in the past.

AJ Flynn has just failed all but one of his GCSEs, and his future is looking far from rosy. So when he is offered a junior position at a London law firm he hopes his life is about to change – but he could never have imagined how much.

Tidying up the archive one day, AJ finds an old key, mysteriously labelled with his name and date of birth – and he becomes determined to find the door that fits the key. And so begins an amazing journey to a very real and tangible past – 1830, to be precise – where the streets of modern Clerkenwell are replaced with cobbles and carts, and the law can be twisted to suit a villain’s means. Although life in 1830 is cheap, AJ and his friends quickly find that their own lives have much more value. They’ve gone from sad youth statistics to young men with purpose – and at the heart of everything lies a crime that only they can solve. But with enemies all around, can they unravel the mysteries of the past, before it unravels them?

A fast-paced mystery novel by one of the UK’s finest writers, The Door That Led To Where will delight, surprise and mesmerise all those who read it.

About the Author

Sally Gardner grew up and still lives in London. Being dyslexic, she did not learn to read or write until she was fourteen and had been thrown out of several schools, labeled unteachable, and sent to a school for maladjusted children. Despite this, she gained a degree with highest honors at a leading London art college, followed by a scholarship to a theater school, and then went on to become a very successful costume designer, working on some notable productions.

 Grab a copy of The Door That Led to Where here

John Larkin, author of The Pause, answers Ten Terrifying Questions

The Booktopia Book Guru asks

John Larkin

author of The Pause

Ten Terrifying Questions
____________

1. To begin with why don’t you tell us a little bit about yourself – where were you born? Raised? Schooled?

I was born in Yorkshire England (1963). My family emigrated to Sydney when I was six years old. We were ten pound poms. I happily and proudly call myself a boat person. I grew up in the western suburbs of Sydney (in Toongabbie to be more accurate). I attended Toongabbie Primary School and then Pendle Hill High School. As to whether or not I actually did any schooling during these wilderness years remains something of a moot point.

2. What did you want to be when you were twelve, eighteen and thirty? And why?

Twelve – professional soccer player, because I was good at it.
Eighteen – professional soccer player, because I was really good at it.
Thirty – author, because my soccer career was over.

John-Larkin-300x200

Author: John Larkin

3. What strongly held belief did you have at eighteen that you do not have now?

That I would pretty much amount to nothing and spend my life alone.

4. What were three works of art – book, painting, piece of music, etc – you can now say, had a great effect on you and influenced your own development as a writer?

Unreliable Memoirs by Clive James. Clive James taught me that you could be both funny and literary, which is something I secretly aspired to but didn’t think was possible.

Catch-22 by Joseph Heller. I read this at uni when I was doing my English degree (ditto above).

The Scream (painting) by Edvard Munch. The perfect representation of madness. And to be a writer you have to be a little bit (or in my case, more than a little bit) mad.

5. Considering the innumerable artistic avenues open to you, why did you choose to write a novel? 

I don’t even know where to begin to answer this question. This might sound kind of naff, but I truly believe that I didn’t have a choice. Writing chose me. I had an unquenchable desire to write and no other art form (other than soccer – and I’m being deadly serious) came close to giving me that creative high that writing does.

6. Please tell us about your latest novel…

In January 2012 I had a complete mental breakdown and spent several weeks in a psychiatric hospital. The Pause was born of this awful period of my life. I wanted to write an uplifting novel about suicide but doubted that it could be done. It had to be hard hitting but hopeful. It took me three years and many drafts but the journey was worth everything. I hope The Pause helps others in the same way (its writing) helped me.

Grab a copy of John’s new book The Pause here

7. What do you hope people take away with them after reading your work?

I hope they take away hope. We will all go through dark and desperate times but we will come out the other side but in order to do that we have to stick around. We have to ride out the dark times and that it is not a sign of weakness but rather one of strength to seek help because we cannot fight our way out of the darkness alone. We need help. We all need help.

8. Whom do you most admire in the realm of writing and why?

Jane Austen. Her life was short but her magnificent work lives on. Reading Pride and Prejudice is like being massaged by words.pride-and-prejudice

9. Many artists set themselves very ambitious goals. What are yours?

I want The Pause to save lives.

10. What advice do you give aspiring writers?

Never give up. If you want this badly enough you will get there. But it’s not enough to just want it. You have to put in the hours. Good writing isn’t written it’s re-written.

John, thank you for playing.

Grab a copy of The Pause here


The Pause

by John Larkin

I watch the train emerge from the tunnel.
It will be quick.
It will be efficient.
It will be final.

Declan seems to have it all: a family that loves him, friends he’s known for years, a beautiful girlfriend he would go to the ends of the earth for. But there’s something in Declan’s past that just won’t go away, that pokes and scratches at his thoughts when he’s at his most vulnerable. Declan feels as if nothing will take away that pain that he has buried deep inside for so long.

So he makes the only decision he thinks he has left: the decision to end it all. Or does he? As the train approaches and Declan teeters at the edge of the platform, two versions of his life are revealed. In one, Declan watches as his body is destroyed and the lives of those who loved him unravel. In the other, Declan pauses before he jumps. And this makes all the difference. One moment. One pause. One whole new life.

From author of The Shadow Girl, winner of the Victorian Premier’s Literary Awards 2012 Prize for Writing for Young Adults, comes a breathtaking new novel that will make you reconsider the road you’re travelling and the tracks you’re leaving behind.

About the Author

Sydney-based author John Larkin was born in England but grew up in the western suburbs of Sydney. He has, at various stages of his writing career, supported his habit by working as a supermarket trolley boy, shelf-stacker, factory hand, forklift driver, professional soccer player and computer programmer. He now writes and teaches writing full-time. John has a BA in English Literature and a MA in Creative Writing from Macquarie University. John’s The Shadow Girl won the Victorian Premier’s Literary Awards 2012 Prize for Writing for Young Adults.

 Grab a copy of The Pause here

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