EXCLUSIVE VIDEO: Sarah Wilson chats to John Purcell about her new book I Quit Sugar for Life

Grab a copy of I Quit Sugar for Life here

I Quit Sugar for Life

by Sarah Wilson

Quitting sugar is not a diet. Quitting sugar is a way of living without processed food and eating like our great-grandparents used to before the crap.

With her bestselling book, I Quit Sugar, Sarah Wilson helped tens of thousands of Australians to kick the habit. In I Quit Sugar for Life, Sarah shows you how to be sugar-free forever. Drawing on extensive research and her own tried and tested methods, Sarah has designed a program to help families and singles:

  • banish cravings by eating good fats and protein
  • deal with lapses
  • maximise nutrition with vegies
  • exercise less for better results
  • detox safely make sustainable food choices
  • cook sugar-free: 128 desserts, cakes, kids’ stuff, comfort dinners and tote-able breakfast and lunches

I Quit Sugar for Life is not just about kicking a habit it; it’s a complete wellness philosophy for your healthiest, calmest, happiest self.

Grab a copy of I Quit Sugar for Life here

About the Author

Sarah Wilson is an Australian media personality, journalist and blogger. She’s the former editor of Cosmopolitan magazine and was one of the hosts of the first series of MasterChef Australia, the highest rating show in Australian TV history.

She’s now the host and program developer for Foxtel’s Lifestyle YOU, and is a commentator and fill-in host on Channel 7’s Sunday Night, The Morning Show and Sunrise and The Project.

Grab a copy of I Quit Sugar for Life here

Haven’t even started quitting sugar yet?

Come on now, back to the start for you…

I Quit Sugar

by Sarah Wilson

Sarah Wilson was a self-confessed sugar addict, eating over 30 teaspoons of sugar every day. She’d developed mood disorders, a weight issue, sleep problems and an overactive thyroid. She knew she had to make a change. In January 2011, she decided to quit sugar. What started as an experiment soon became a way of life, and she hasn’t looked back since.

This book outlines the dangers of sugar, provides a step-by-step guide to kicking the habit, and provides 80 delicious sugar-free recipes. Packed with great advice, fun tips, personal stories and gorgeous photography, this is a sensible, simple and accessible guide to losing weight and getting well.

Grab a copy of I Quit Sugar here

Sarah Wilson is back with I Quit Sugar for Life – Pre-order today

I Quit Sugar for Life

by Sarah Wilson

Quitting sugar is not a diet. Quitting sugar is a way of living without processed food and eating like our great-grandparents used to before the crap.

With her bestselling book, I Quit Sugar, Sarah Wilson helped tens of thousands of Australians to kick the habit.

In I Quit Sugar for Life, Sarah shows you how to be sugar-free forever.

Drawing on extensive research and her own tried and tested methods, Sarah has designed a program to help families and singles:

  • Banish cravings by eating good fats and protein
  • Deal with lapses
  • Maximise nutrition with vegies
  • Exercise less for better results
  • Detox safely make sustainable food choices
  • Cook sugar-free: 128 desserts, cakes, kids’ stuff, comfort dinners and tote-able breakfast and lunches

I Quit Sugar for Life is not just about kicking a habit it; it’s a complete wellness philosophy for your healthiest, calmest, happiest self.

About the Author

Sarah Wilson is an Australian media personality, journalist and blogger. She’s the former editor of Cosmopolitan magazine and was one of the hosts of the first series of MasterChef Australia, the highest rating show in Australian TV history.

She’s now the host and program developer for Foxtel’s Lifestyle YOU, and is a commentator and fill-in host on Channel 7’s Sunday Night, The Morning Show and Sunrise and The Project.

Sarah is an adept social commentator, following a career that’s spanned politics, health advocacy, restaurant reviewing, opinion writing and trend forecasting. She’s also a qualified health coach with the Institute of Integrative Nutrition in New York.

Grab a copy of I Quit Sugar for Life here

T.M.Clark, Author of My Brother-But-One, answers Ten Terrifying Questions

The Booktopia Book Guru asks

T.M.Clark

author of My Brother-But-One

Ten Terrifying Questions

———————

1. To begin with why don’t you tell us a little bit about yourself – where were you born? Raised? Schooled?

I was born in Bulawayo, Zimbabwe, and although I spent my junior school years in boarding school and on a ranch in Zimbabwe, my Senior school years (Standard 6 – 10 or as they say in Australia – Year 8 – 12) were in a small South African town called Kokstad, which is in the foothills of the Drakensberg mountains.

During my years in Zimbabwe, you could usually find me riding my horse around, exploring our ranch, usually armed and with our 2 killer dogs running near by protecting me. Yes, I grew up in a war zone so it was necessary. But I knew such freedom during that time that I have never experienced since.

At senior school I no longer had my own horse, but would ride any of my friends one whenever I could, I also played any and every sport (except swimming… I don’t like swimming, maybe because I was always taught  ‘if you can’t see the bottom don’t get in as there might be a crocodile there’ or ‘the water might have bilharzia snails in it’ – but honestly me and actually swimming in water just don’t mix…)  and I don’t ever remember being bored growing up despite living permanently in a school boarding establishment.

I used to be a reluctant reader , although I read a lot and fast, once I started to actually read. I think my poor English teachers deserve gold stars for putting up with my really bad spelling all those years – although my one English teacher Mr Hinchliff doubled as the computer teacher, and I think he was way-way before his time, in that he once told me not to worry too much about my bad spelling, as computers would fix that all one day… and he was right.

2. What did you want to be when you were twelve, eighteen and thirty? And why?

Twelve: When I was about 8 years old, a vet visited our farm when a bull gored one of our horses. He stitched up that horse and he was as good as new/ Yet that vet was so gentle and so caring with that horse, and so wanting it to live and be okay. I just knew I wanted to be a vet from then on. So I practiced  – on frogs, and removed their appendix and stitched them back up and put them back in the reservoir…I can’t say that they lived…( I know barbaric when I think back on it…)  Until when I was fifteen, I discovered that in South Africa the only Veterinary Science University at that time was in Pretoria at the Onderstepoort campus, and it was all done in Afrikaans. My Afrikaans was dismal and I knew then I would never get into that university – and never be a vet.

At eighteen I was already working to pay for my first year at university by correspondence to study for an Accounting Degree – why? Because I was good at it and it came naturally to me, but also one teacher at school had said to me I should be an accountant.  With no other direction to go – it seemed like a better place than joining the army where my aunt wanted me to be…

At thirty I just wanted to get through each day and not drop a child from sleep deprivation. Yes seriously! I was living in England, and although I had a live out au pair for our two boys while I was at work, life was hectic. I had just gone back to work to complete my last few months of my Internal Quality Auditing Certification, and then we decided to move countries – again. At thirty I could only think of getting through each week, not a career in the future, but, lucky, I had already started fiction writing, so my trajectory in life was already changing.T.M.Clark

3. What strongly held belief did you have at eighteen that you do not have now?

At eighteen I strongly believed that I wouldn’t marry until I was at least 30 years old. And then I would adopt children, because there were so many in the world that needed homes already. Both theories blown out the water… I was married just after I turned 22 years old (and in two weeks it is our 22nd wedding anniversary!) And I had delivered two of our own children naturally, before I was thirty!

4. What were three works of art – book or painting or piece of music, etc – you can now say, had a great effect on you and influenced your own development as a writer?

Book : Jock of the Bushvelt – Sir James Percy FitzPatrick. I have somehow managed to hold onto my copy from when I was like 10 years old. I remember my dad reading it to me, and I loved the story. At the time I didn’t realize how much impact it had on me. But now years later I realize that now I want to write stories that inspire as well as entertain readers, and my love for an African stories goes way way back…

Music: Johnny Clegg/Juluka/Savuka  – all their music – but especially December Africa Rain. This song was one of my theme tunes for My Brother-But-One. This music touches me and makes me remember Africa, its people and the stuggles and yet the hope of those same people, and I find I write from a well deep inside – not from my head.

Painting: I am not a big art fanatic, I can’t tell a Picasso from a Van Gogh. But when I saw the round stained glass window in the Notre Dame Cathedral in Paris, I was in awe and I can remember just staring at it feeling really tiny and insignificant. It was so hard to believe that one man could think of creating something so huge that it dominated so much of the cathedral, and yet it was so beautiful and so soothing to those who looked at it.

As a writer, I still feel like that: tiny and insignificant, but now I know that I have started to share my ‘own pieces of art’ out into the world. It will never compare to the glass window in Notre Dame, it doesn’t have to. But it will be my own small contribution to the world, through my eyes and my heart, just as the window once was to someone else.

5. Considering the innumerable artistic avenues open to you, why did you choose to write a novel?

I love sewing, and I love creating interesting clothing to wear, I don’t however want to be the next Dior designer.  I love gardening and seeing things grow, from seeds , propagating whatever, I am always giving away plants to people, creating new flower beds, yet I’m not the next Jamie Durie. But, I have always told stories.

When I was really young, I made up these characters and would tell my sisters these stories. As the years past, so did that phase in life, but it reemerged when I had my own children, and once again, I would make up bedtime stories. But it wasn’t until my husband influenced the writing down of them, that I actually thought about ‘telling stories’ for others to read. And its just grown from there.

Some of this story My Brother-But-One is based on a few real events in my life. But mostly its fictional.

True – My dad’s family’s ranches were taken in the land distribution program in Zimbabwe. Even miles away on the other side of the world, I was so effected by this immense loss and tragic event.

False – the scene depicting this in the book. I didn’t capture it as it happened exactly, I write fiction remember…

This book wanted to tell the story. If I didn’t write this story, it would drive me nuts as it would never shut up inside my head.  (No, I’m not schizophrenic or on medication for mental illness…) This story has been cooking for many years, its evolved sure, but once I was writing it, it wanted to be told, and there wasn’t much I could do to stop telling it. Even if it never got published, as long as the story was told, the characters were happy and I can move onto the next one that has been pushing to the front, waiting to be written…

6. Please tell us about your latest novel…

Scott Decker and Zol Ndhlovu are partners in a private game ranch in Zimbabwe. They have a friendship borne from Africa — a brotherhood that endures the generation gap — and crosses the colour barrier. Australian Ashley Twine is a thirty-something dynamic achiever and a confident businesswoman. When a gender mix-up secures her a position on a volunteer program in the Hwange National Park, Ashley gets a chance to take stock of her life and reassess her situation. But the chauvinistic Scott — who runs the operation — is adamant she isn’t cut out for the job.

After Ashley witnesses first-hand the devastation left behind by poachers, Scott finds himself torn between wanting to protect Ashley or force her to leave Africa for her own safety…and his sanity. However, nothing can prepare her for being ambushed and held captive by the psychopathic Rodney — an old enemy of Zol’s — from a war fought years ago. But now that their world has been threatened, circumstances take hold of their lives and begin to shape and change them forever.

Set against a magnificent backdrop of Africa across the decades, I explore both the challenges and the traditions between the white and black families of rural Africa.

7. What do you hope people take away with them after reading your work?

A feeling of hope, and acceptance that a family unit isn’t necessarily made up of the traditional 1 man + 1 women + 2 kids = perfect family. I want readers to fall in love and want to visit Africa, but, mostly for just a moment, to feel rhythm of the African rhythm in their hearts too as they read. And if the reader can somehow help stop the slaughter of the wild life because of the new love they feel, all the better!

8. Whom do you most admire in the realm of writing and why?

Jean M. Auel- The Children of the Earth Series. Her books are so real, so full of detail that you can almost feel that you are back in time in that period in history and its all tangible. Her intricate novels have captivated me for years.
Robin Hobb – All her books, but I was captivated by The Rain Wild Chronicles and her Liveship Traders Trilogy, again, it’s the details that get me, her world seems real and I lose myself in it while reading her books.

In my genre – Tony Park. Tony is an Australian who is living there six months of the year, and writing these amazing stories that pin-point exactly the pulse of Africa.  Again, his attention to details is amazing. Yet, he still has time to give to any charity that helps the people or animals in Africa. And Tony is encouraging to up coming writers, never brushing them aside. He sent me my cover quote when he was camping in the Hwange National Park in Zimbabwe and he found he had cell coverage – that is dedication! I’m sure Nicola his wife will tell you he has fault, but to me Tony is the perfect colonial gentleman author.

9. Many artists set themselves very ambitious goals. What are yours?

Maybe a better word for that would be ‘dreams’ because some things that happen are out of an author’s control. My dream would be to sell world rights. I would so love to see my books in the USA, England, South Africa, Russia, China and all the territories, and see translations, that must be so neat, and I would ‘dream’ of visiting each place my book was published in to see it there, as I am a gypsy at heart and love an excuse to travel! Also, I have a cousin who doesn’t read, but if my book was an audio book, he would get to hear it, so the audio rights too…

Friends of mine have had their books turned into Manga. I think it would be so cool to have your book in a manga style… perhaps its that little bit in me that loves that an adult book can have pictures in it!!!

Dreams – Oh hell lets got the whole hog – would love to see this book as a movie – sitting next to Out Of Africa, Gorillas in the Mist and e-Lollipop as a classic one day….LOL

10. What advice do you give aspiring writers?

2 things…

1. Just write the book that you want to, make your dream happen.

2. There are so many avenues open to authors, don’t rush at the first opportunity that comes along. Stop, think with your business head, take your time and get it right if you are publishing anything.  Writing might be your passion, but it’s your business, so treat it with professional courtesy.

Thank you so much for having me. It’s been interesting doing these questions. I thought at first glance they were not so terrifying as the six sexy ones I did with Haylee Nash at the RWA Conference in Perth in August – but I was wrong. They seriously are terrifying, but fun too!

Tina, thank you for playing.

Pick up a copy of My Brother-But-One here

Amanda Prowse, Author of A Little Love, Clover’s Child, What Have I Done and more answers Ten Terrifying Questions

a-little-loveThe Booktopia Book Guru asks

Amanda Prowse

author of A Little Love, Clover’s Child, What Have I Done? and more…

Ten Terrifying Questions

———————

1. To begin with why don’t you tell us a little bit about yourself – where were you born? Raised? Schooled?

I was born in East London (for anyone that hasn’t been there, think of the glamour of the West End, the shiny lobbies of smart hotels and the plush department stores – well, where I come from was the exact opposite, grubby, poor and cramped. But we was ‘appy!) I lived there surrounded by my loud extended family until my mid teens when my life ended.

My parents uprooted me from my friends, Saturday job at Camden Market and all that I held dear and moved me to North Yorkshire – the countryside aaaagh! Where I swapped make-up for wellington boots and live gigs for farmers markets, it was bliss. I have 3 brothers to whom I am very close. My parents had me when they were in their teens and my childhood was one of noise, laughter and the sense that we were all figuring it out as we went along, which was sometimes exciting, often a little scary.

2. What did you want to be when you were twelve, eighteen and thirty? And why?

When I was twelve I wanted to be Jennifer McCulloch, she was in my class and had big boobs and a big house, nuff said.

When I was eighteen I wanted to change the world, fight social injustice and make a difference (at 46 I still do!) I thought I would do it via journalism and raging against the machine.

At thirty I wanted to be eighteen again. amanda-prowse

3. What strongly held belief did you have at eighteen that you do not have now?

At eighteen I genuinely believed that a movement based on ‘Niceness and Compassion’ could be so infectious that it might start the change the planet needed. ‘Enough For All’ if everyone played fair – be it with food, money, love… I now think there are some people with so much that the idea of sharing and ‘giving something up’ is so terrifying that it’s impossible. This makes me sad. (and won’t stop me trying!)

4. What were three works of art – book or painting or piece of music, etc – you can now say, had a great effect on you and influenced your own development as a writer?

As a teenager I devoured music with passion, absorbing as much as I could. I still do, but am much more particular about what I listen to. It was not unusual in my teens to find me listening to Depeche Mode (Speak & Spell), Bowie (ChangesTwo) and then crying on the sofa at the magic of Etta James. One of my brothers would then punch me and tell me to snap out of it and normality would be restored.

I guess through my love of music, I learnt that what you love and what will shape you, is dependent on your mood and circumstance. It’s no different with writing – you have to keep it fluid and accessible.

5. Considering the innumerable artistic avenues open to you, why did you choose to write a novel?

I guess primarily because I am singularly useless at anything else! But also because I have a love of words, the way they look on a page, the way they can stay hovering in your mind long after that book is shut and because for me, it’s the easiest way to paint a picture.

a-little-love6. Please tell us about your latest novel…

My latest novel is called A Little Love and has been described as a fairy-tale for the modern woman – which I love! It is the story of Pru Plum – a successful baker and businesswoman who falls in love for the first time at 66.

The backdrop is the rich, indulgent world of gourmet cakes and dough and I hope sends out the message that you never know what twist or turn your life is about to take – love and adventure can strike at any time if you are brave enough to let it!

7. What do you hope people take away with them after reading your work?

I hope that I write tales that stimulate debate and discussion. What would you do in my heroine’s shoes? Did you approve of her choices? But mainly I hope to create stories that stop you from turning off the bedside lamp at night, no matter how early that alarm clock is set because you have to read one more chapter…

8. Whom do you most admire in the realm of writing and why?

Phew – so many! I repeatedly return to the work of Isabel Allende and I learn something new every time I re-read her novels. I love her style, characters and the sensory feast that awaits me on every page. However, as I have stated before my favourite book of all time is The Book Thief . It moved me, it changed me and I know there is a movie out now, but if I’m being honest, I’m frightened to go and see it for fear of damaging the imagery in my head. It is a perfect novel and I can only throw clichéd statements at it a rollercoaster, a page-turner, it stayed with me. All however are absolutely true.

9. Many artists set themselves very ambitious goals. What are yours?what-have-i-done-

My goal is simply to continue writing as I consider what I do to be an absolute privilege. I don’t deserve accolades I’m not driving an ambulance or serving my country, I simply write stories, but to earn a living by doing something I love so dearly – now that’s really something.

10. What advice do you give aspiring writers?

I have this sign on my kitchen wall ‘Persevere – never, ever, ever give up.’ And I so I think it would be that.

It’s really tough to get your work read and I am sure that many wonderful novels never get to break through the surface. Every writer gets rejected; use that criticism and feedback as fuel and act on all the advice. Tenacity, luck and honing your craft can only help in your quest.

Also, you don’t need to be a bestseller to get an enormous amount of joy from writing – whether it’s keeping a journal or writing a letter, do what brings you joy!

Amanda, thank you for playing.

Pick up a copy of A Little Love here

Jess Ainscough, author of Make Peace With Your Plate, answers Ten Terrifying Questions

Click here for more details or to buyThe Booktopia Book Guru asks

Jess Ainscough

author of Make Peace With Your Plate

Ten Terrifying Questions

———————

1. To begin with why don’t you tell us a little bit about yourself – where were you born? Raised? Schooled?

I was born in Ipswich (don’t judge me), grew up in a tiny town called Walkerston in North QLD before moving to the Sunshine Coast when I was 10. I stayed on the Sunshine Coast through the rest of primary school, all of high school and through university. After uni I moved to Sydney to start my magazine career, but this was cut short after just three years when I was diagnosed with terminal cancer and decided to move back to the Sunshine Coast. I never plan on leaving here ever again – it’s paradise!

2. What did you want to be when you were twelve, eighteen and thirty? And why?

12 – A journalist (apart from my brief desire to be a supermodel)

18 – A journalist

30 – I’m yet to hit the 3-0. At 28 though, I’m absolutely in love with what I do. I get to write about something I’m super passionate about every single day. It never actually feels like work.Author: Jess Ainscough

3. What strongly held belief did you have at eighteen that you do not have now?

That I needed to be trashed in order to have a fun night out.

4. What were three big events – in the family circle or on the world stage or in your reading life, for example – you can now say, had a great effect on you and influenced you in your career path?

1. My Sweet Valley High obsession. I started reading these books in year two or three, and this sparked a life-long love affair with words.

2. Work experience at Cosmopolitan magazine while I was at uni. This was my first taste of the magazine world, and I loved everything about it – from doing the coffee run while I was on work experience to later on being able to actually write for the magazines.

3. My cancer diagnosis. Before cancer, I was working at Dolly magazine. It was an amazing life, but something even better was waiting for me. So, the universe gave me a big kick up the bum to force me onto a different path – the path I am supposed to be on.

5. Considering the innumerable electronic media avenues open to you – blogs, online newspapers, TV, radio, etc – why have you chosen to write a book? aren’t they obsolete?

Definitely not! I don’t think it matters how many tech advancements we embrace, books will always have their place. Books are a much-needed escapism from the fast-paced, tech-driven lives we lead. I’ve wanted to write a book since I was eight years old and first started reading novels. Over the years I’ve formed strong relationships with so many amazing books, and I want my words to have the privilege of being embraced in that way by someone.

6. PlClick here for more details or to buyease tell us about your latest book…

Make Peace With Your Plate is memoir and part exploration into the possibility of ditching diets and mending our torturous relationships with food. It’s about getting back to basics, eating real food, loving and accepting ourselves, and establishing a relationship with food where the love is a two-way street. We can love food that loves us back.

This book began it’s life as an e-book on my website. It sold really well and resonated with so many of my readers that I decided to pitch it to Hay House as a printed book. I entered their annual Writer’s Workshop competition and ended up winning an international publishing contract with them. This book is an extension of the original e-book, about three times as long and with a lot more depth into the topics I discuss.

7. If your work could change one thing in this world – what would it be?

To end factory farming. This disgusting system is cruel, inhumane and should be illegal.

8. Whom do you most admire and why?

Professionally, I admire Cyndi O’Meara, best-selling author of Changing Habits Changing Lives and the woman who wrote the forward to my book. Whenever I’m about to write about something I know is going to be unpopular with the mainstream I think about Cyndi and all of the resistance she’s faced as a nutritionist who challenges mainstream norm.

Personally, I admire my mum. No one compares to her kindness, compassion and fierce determination.

9. Many people set themselves very ambitious goals. What are yours?

I don’t have specific “goals”. I used to, but if there’s one thing my journey has taught me it’s that we shouldn’t sell ourselves short by setting firm goals. I have intentions that I want to collaborate with the universe on. I know that if I’m always coming from a place of service and showing up as my best every day, the rest will take care of itself.

I want to contribute to the wave we’re seeing when it comes to the way people treat themselves and their bodies. I want my life to continue to be an example of how to show up as your best self every day and get the most out of every moment. I want to give people hope, I want to be an inspiration, I want to give people permission to put themselves first, and I want to be such a champion for Mother Nature and her healing powers that we collectively put her back on the pedestal she was knocked off of when we decided we could do better than her.

 10. What advice do you give aspiring writers?

Read obsessively. Write consistently. Let your personality ooze through your words.

Jess, thank you for playing.

Pick up a copy of Make Peace With Your Plate here

Click here for more details or to buyMake Peace with Your Plate
Change Your Life, One Meal At A Time

By Jess Ainscough

In Make Peace With Your Plate, Jessica shares her journey from party-girl and cancer patient to healthy lifestyle ambassador. Diagnosed at 22 with a rare type of incurable cancer and told that her only option to prolong her life was to amputate her arm, Jess set about learning everything she could about alternative treatments. Six years on, following a complete change in lifestyle, diet and mindset, she is cancer-free and thriving.

Building on all that she has learned about health and wellness, Jess now shares her simple philosophy for stopping your battle with food, including:

  • Which foods you need to maintain a healthy body and a clear mind
  • How to create a healthier lifestyle, long term
  • What else, apart from food, can contribute to your wellbeing
  • Daily practices to keep you looking and feeling great.

Jessica’s honest and informative story gives you all you need to become a wellness warrior!

About the Author

Jess Ainscough is a writer, holistic health coach, and the creator of the health and wellness website, The Wellness Warrior. Via her e-books, daily blog posts, and videos, Jess’ goal is to empower people to take control of their health and show that the quality of our lives is directly linked to how we treat our body and mind. Her transformation from champagne-guzzling, Lean Cuisine-loving magazine writer to all-out nutrition nerd was made after she was diagnosed with a rare, “incurable” cancer back in 2008. Deciding she wasn’t having a bar of that “incurable” nonsense, Jess took responsibility for her condition and healed herself with two years of Gerson Therapy. Along the way, Jess developed a obsession with passing on all of her newly learnt wellness wisdom to anyone who was parked in front of her for long enough to listen.

Pick up a copy of Make Peace With Your Plate here

Emma Sutherland & Michelle Thrift, authors of 50 Foods That Will Change Your Life, answers Ten Terrifying Questions

50-foods-that-will-change-your-lifeThe Booktopia Book Guru asks

Emma Sutherland & Michelle Thrift

Co-authors of 50 Foods That Will Change Your Life

Ten Terrifying Questions

———————————

1. To begin with why don’t you tell us a little bit about yourself – where were you born? Raised? Schooled?

EMMA: I was born and raised in Melbourne. After finishing high school in Melbourne I completed my naturopathy and science degrees in Sydney.

MICHELLE:
-I was born in Sydney Australia.

-Raised in South West Suburbs of Sydney.

-Schooled in Catholic schools in South West suburbs of Sydney.

-Trained in commercial cookery and home economics in some of Sydney’s Top Culinary Colleges.

2. What did you want to be when you were 12, 18 and 30? And why?

Continue reading

Janine Allis, author of The Secrets of My Success – the story of Boost Juice, juicy bits and all, answers Ten Terrifying Questions

the-secrets-of-my-successThe Booktopia Guru asks

Janine Allis

author of The Secrets of My Success – the story of Boost Juice, juicy bits and all

Ten Terrifying Questions

1. To begin with why don’t you tell us a little bit about yourself – where were you born? Raised? Schooled?

I was born in the Ferntree Gully Hospital, in the east of Melbourne. I was raised in the semi rural (at the time) suburb of Knoxfield in a very small house. I shared a bedroom with my two sisters. I went to a tech college called Knox Technical College. It no longer exists. The school was very casual, we called the teachers by their first name and there were no uniforms.

2. What did you want to be when you were twelve, eighteen and thirty? And why?

At twelve, I just wanted to be in A grade for netball.

At 18 years old, I simply wanted to be a traveller having adventures all over the world.

By 30, I wanted my own business.

Funnily enough, I achieved all of the above.

3. What strongly held belief did you have at eighteen that you do not have now?Janine-allis-1

That I was invincible. That my friends will have my back and they are the most important people in the world.

I now know it is that family who you think are not very important when you are 18, who had then and has now, always got your back.

4. What were three big events – in the family circle or on the world stage or in your reading life, for example – you can now say, had a great effect on you and influenced you in your career path?

• Meeting David Puttnam (producer of Chariots of Fire, Midnight Express, Killing Fields ) on a boat in the Caribbean.

• It was David Puttnam, who was a friend of David Bowie (Janine worked on David Bowie’s yacht), who introduced me to the CEO of Village Roadshow, which stated my career in retail.

• From there I met my husband who is the most influential person in my life.

5. Considering the innumerable electronic media avenues open to you – blogs, online newspapers, TV, radio, etc – why have you chosen to write a book? Aren’t they obsolete?

History is re-written all the time. What I read about myself and the difference between the stories and reality is interesting. It is nice to trace the journey in my own words. Life goes by so quickly, and many people have helped me on my journey. I am hoping this book shows the human and faulty side of me. I want readers to have a laugh (normally at me) and with a bit of luck the reader will take something away, to help them in their life and business journey.

I believe there will be always a place for books. Maybe in 5-10 years they will not be in the printed form, but they will exist…what else are you going to do on a beach?

the-secrets-of-my-success6. Please tell us about your latest book…

My book is about my journey in my life from a young girl from the burbs to a woman in her late forties and changes I went through whilst creating this business called Boost. The start of the book is stories about my life, and the second part is tips and lessons that I wish I had known prior to starting Boost.

From the Publisher:
How do you turn a single juice bar into a global company with more than 6000 employees and $160 million in global sales? Ask Janine Allis. In The Secrets of My Success, Australia’s hottest entrepreneur tells the inside story of the growth of Boost Juice, including her personal journey from housewife with no formal business training to successful entrepreneur. Along the way, she discovered the 30 business and leadership tips she calls her ‘recipes for success’. The Secrets of My Success also explores how Allis’s personal philosophy based on a love for life has brought the company loyal customers and created satisfied, dedicated employees.

    -The perfect guide for budding entrepreneurs to reject the traditional wisdom that the only way to succeed in business is with a business degree
    -An inside look at the successful management and leadership philosophy of one of Australia’s greatest entrepreneurs
    -Includes a full-colour photo insert section.

For today’s entrepreneur looking for non-traditional paths to extreme success, The Secrets of My Success offers practical business and leadership wisdom combined with Allis’s own compelling personal story.

Click here to buy The Secrets of My Success from Booktopia,
Australia’s Local Bookstore

7. If your work could change one thing in this world – what would it be?

The growth in obesity and obesity related diseases has increased with the growth in fast food. I would hope that my work can contribute to people living a longer and healthier life.

8. Whom do you most admire and why?

I admire my mum, for her selflessness to me and my family.

I admire my husband for his incredible drive and passion.

In the business world, I admire Howard Schultz and Anita Roddick. Both these businesspeople have taken an idea, and created an iconic brand that has been a trailblazer in its respective field. No easy feat.

9. Many people set themselves very ambitious goals. What are yours?

We do BHAGS (Big Hairy Audacious Goals), which is to be the largest and most successful juice and smoothie bar in the world. I would say we have achieved this.

Also, to be the most loved and known brand in the world. We are still working on this one.

10. What advice do you give aspiring writers?

To be yourself, let “you” come through so the reader gets to know you, not your editor.

Janine, thank you for playing.

Click here to buy The Secrets of My Success from Booktopia,
Australia’s Local Bookstore

Toxic Oil: Why Vegetable Oil Will Kill You and How to Save Yourself by David Gillespie

Toxic Oil: Why Vegetable Oil Will Kill You & How to Save Yourself

by David Gillespie, author of
Big Fat Lies: How the Diet Industry is Making you Sick, Fat and Poor ,
Sweet Poison and The Sweet Poison Quit Plan

Everything you believe about fat is wrong.

  • Polyunsaturated oil – everyone knows it’s good for you, right? Wrong!
  • And we all know artery-clogging, cholesterol-forming saturated fat is bad for you, don’t we? Wrong again!Click here for more details or to buy Sweet Poison

In his previous book Big Fat Lies, David Gillespie showed that these ‘truths’ are in fact myths, based on poor research and bad evidence.

‘Vegetable oil’, which isn’t made from vegetables at all, but manufactured from seeds, has systematically replaced saturated fats in our diets over the past one hundred years, but our rates of obesity, heart disease, diabetes and cancer are higher than ever.

In Toxic Oil, David reviews the latest evidence on why vegetable oil will kill you. He shows us how to avoid it and leads us through the supermarket, explaining how to read food labels and which products to buy. In the recipe section, you’ll discover how to make versions of delicious meals and snacks that are difficult to buy without seed oil. No need to give up hot chips!

With this practical guide in hand, you’ll be able to make healthy food choices based on evidence rather than what the processed food industry wants you to believe. So have a good breakfast – preferably bacon and eggs – strap yourself in, and be prepared to have everything you thought you knew about fat turned upside down.

Click here to order TOXIC OIL from Booktopia,
Australia’s Local Bookstore

COMING IN APRIL 2013

Sarah Wilson, author of I Quit Sugar: The Complete Plan and Recipe Book, answers Ten Terrifying Questions

The Booktopia Book Guru asks

Sarah Wilson

author of I Quit Sugar: The Complete Plan and Recipe Book

Ten Terrifying Questions

———————-

1. To begin with why don’t you tell us a little bit about yourself – where were you born? Raised? Schooled?

I actually grew up in the country on a subsistence-living farm outside Canberra. We had goats for milk and meat and everything was recycled. In fact, we didn’t have garbage!

I commuted into Canberra for school – Lyneham High and Dickson College. A lot of my food philosophy stems from my upbringing…and the recipes  in I Quit Sugar are about conserving and not wasting and being simple and economical…perfect for families and young people!!

2. What did you want to be when you were twelve, eighteen and thirty? And why?

I love this…my interests did shift. As a kid I wanted to be the first female Prime Minister of Australia. I was the eldest of six kids…being influential was in my blood.

At 18 I was dreadfully confused. And so I tried all kinds of things for a good decade.

At 30, I wanted to be doing something meaningful, communicating and working freely….which is pretty much my life now.

“As a kid I wanted to be the first female Prime Minister of Australia.”

3. What strongly held belief did you have at eighteen that you do not have now?

Ha… that I was right.

4. What were three big events – in the family circle or on the world stage or in your reading life, for example – you can now say, had a great effect on you and influenced you in your career path?

My Year 5 teacher gave me the class prize and said, in front of the school at the end of year “graduation”, that my curiosity was a gift. I treasure her words. They spurred me on.

Moving to Sydney when I was 29, from Melbourne. Suddenly everything sped up and made sense. I felt that I belonged.

Reading Long Walk to Freedom by Nelson Mandela. Such mindful endurance of hardship…it very much guided me through my own troubles with illness.

5. Considering the innumerable electronic media avenues open to you – blogs, online newspapers, TV, radio, etc – why have you chosen to write a book? aren’t they obsolete?

I know what you mean…the book started out as two ebooks which did very well…more than what a ebook usually does in this market. But there is still a market who want a hard copy, and so it made sense to produce it as such. I very much did things back to front, but perhaps that’s the future.

Long Walk To Freedom – “Such mindful endurance of hardship.”

It’s an 8-week program for quitting sugar, plus a bunch (108) recipes for sugar-free snacks, breakfasts, cakes, kids’ treats and detox meals (for getting clean!).

It’s based on my experience quitting sugar, two years of research into the best techniques, and my work as a qualified health coach. It’s not a diet…it’s a way of living that basically cuts out all processed food.

You can drink wine, eat bacon and cheese, you don’t count calories. More than 70,000 people have done the program I developed and everyone (to my knowledge) loses weight. Some lose 20, 30 and even 55 kilos, just from quitting sugar.

7. If your work could change one thing in this world – what would it be?

To get everyone back to natural appetite and hunger. This would solve obesity and most modern diseases, as well as reduce the environmental impact of processed food.

8. Whom do you most admire and why?

Today it’s Bill Cunningham, the American photographer. I just watched the documentary about his life. I love how he does what he does because he wants to connect with humanity. I refuses payment for his work most  of the time because he feels it interferes what he’s there to do. He’s free, as a result. I admire people who make sacrifices to be truly free and helpful to humanity.

9. Many people set themselves very ambitious goals. What are yours?

To  be as authentic as I can.

10. What advice do you give aspiring writers?

To have a blog (to practice writing freely and to advertise your wares)

To move across all different mediums…radio, Twitter, Instagram, blogs, print. Gone are the days when you could do just the one. You have to spin plates now.

Study good writing.

Just write. Sit down and do the work.

Sarah, thank you for playing.

Click here to order I Quit Sugar from Booktopia,
Australia’s Local Bookstore

HOT TITLE: Six Weeks to OMG: Get Skinnier Than All Your Friends by Venice A. Fulton

An enormous self-published success attracting huge media interest, Venice A. Fulton is teaming up with Penguin to bring his ground-breaking Six Weeks to OMG to the masses. Because anyone with the correct information – and that means anyone ­- can get skinny.

Let’s test your knowledge: true or false?

  • skipping breakfast can be healthy
  • certain fruits instantly block fat loss
  • small frequent meals are damaging
  • cellulite can be massively reduced in everyone
  • juices and smoothies cause overeating
  • exercise is more than just how much and how hard
  • broccoli carbs can be worse than those from Coke

They’re all TRUE.

Using biological science, psychology and common sense, Venice will show you how to lose up to 20 pounds of body fat in six weeks. His plan, originally designed for A-List celebs, proves that quick fixes don’t work, but quick improvements are still possible. No one is born fat or destined to have cellulite forever. And if you think you’ve failed on a diet before, think again – the diet failed, you didn’t.

‘The diet that’s changing diets.’ Metro

Six Weeks To OMG is quickly becoming one of the top slimming books on the market.’ Daily Mail

Click here to buy Six Weeks to OMG from Booktopia,
Australia’s No.1 Online Book Shop

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