Craig Harper, author of Pull Your Finger Out, answers Ten Terrifying Questions

pull-your-finger-outThe Booktopia Book Guru asks

Craig Harper

author of Pull Your Finger Out

Ten Terrifying Questions

1. To begin with why don’t you tell us a little bit about yourself – where were you born? Raised? Schooled?

I was born in the thriving, bustling metropolis of… Ballarat. I am a needy, attention-seeking only child. I was raised in Tasmania, rural Victoria and various suburbs of Melbourne. My family moved a lot. I think my parents were trying to avoid the law.

2. What did you want to be when you were 12, 18 and 30? And why?

At 12, I wanted to be skinny. I was a fat kid. A whopper, in fact. At 18, I wanted to be a bodybuilder, gym owner and chick magnet. All very unlikely outcomes. At 30 I wanted to be less tired and stressed because I was a gym owner, coach and teacher who worked way too many hours. Continue reading

Dr. Yvonne Sum, author of Intentional Parenting: How to Get Results for Both You and Your Kids, answers Ten Terrifying Questions

The Booktopia Book Guru asks

Dr. Yvonne Sum

author of Intentional Parenting : How to Get Results for Both You and Your Kids

Ten Terrifying Questions

 ——————————–

1. To begin with why don’t you tell us a little bit about yourself – where were you born? Raised? Schooled?

I consider myself a bit of a global product: I was made in Sydney Australia, exported to Malaysia when I was 2 years old, recalled to Australia (hopefully no major defects that an Aussie attitude will not fix), 1.5 decades later, and re-packaged for the global marketplace. Currently I am being held in Qatar (strategically placed in the world so I can get to most places of the globe within 8 hours’ flight, and only need travel long- haul to get to Melbourne (12 hours) or Houston (17 hours).

2. What did you want to be when you were twelve, eighteen and thirty? And why?

I always wanted to be around people: I was energised by people. I loved being with people. I loved learning from them. My passions revolved around people – and how to learn to get them to live their highest potential.

So it is hardly surprising that when I was 6 years old, I told my grandmother that I wanted to be the mother of 100 children. To which she wisely replied (with a twinkle in her eye): “You will have to start straight away, my dear … and hope to live long enough to accomplish such a feat.”

At 12 years old, I wanted to be a nurse – as I had been reading story upon story of heroines who served as nurses in the war. I adored Florence Nightingale. Mostly I felt that nurses provided great comfort when people (patients and their families) were at their worst.

When my 18th birthday came around, I had fallen in love with the prospect of being a journalist. I had been involved as the editor of my school newspaper (that I founded) and was busy on the school magazine team. My projects took me to meet many people in the community whom I loved interviewing and learning from. Sadly, I had fallen out of love with the typewriter (this was pre-word processing via a pc or notebook…) by the time I had to sign up for my University degree. I queued up to join the ranks of the beloved (NOT!) profession – the dental surgeon – via a short sojourn in the Royal Australian Air Force as a Pilot Officer in the Medical Corp. Why? Well, I thought I could work hands-on more with people and less with paperwork (as I did not have to deal with the dreaded typewriter) and there was a certain romantic ideal that I could become a heroine saving my patients from (pulpal) death and waging my war against the epidemic of dental anxiety and phobia in the community!

By the time I was 30, I was getting traction in my battle against Dental Anxiety through my roles as a Media Spokesperson for the Australian Dental Association (in my attempt to re-brand The Dentist in our Community as a public friendly educator and motivator of DIY self-help health – after all, most of dental disease was preventable), an Educator / Mentor for University of Sydney Dental Undergraduates and Post-Graduates, and a dental entrepreneur who ran practices that aimed to deliver quality healthcare that was engaging for both patient and team member.

However, it was not until I turned 34, when I faced a remarkable turning point in my life that put me in the best role ever. I became a parent to my little boy Jett and two years later, his sister Xian. I realised that my calling was to learn leadership from first-hand parenting – so I may help the world reach their highest potential by working with the parents.

So began my empirical research into ‘Parents as Leaders’ – and conversely ‘Leaders as Parents’…. which took me down my current path as a Leadership Coach, Certified Speaking Professional and Author.

3. What strongly held belief did you have at eighteen that you do not have now?

That parents have all the answers!

4. What were three big events – in the family circle or on the world stage or in your reading life, for example – you can now say, had a great effect on you and influenced you in your career path?

Becoming a parent.

Discovering NLP on my journey to understand our human condition.

Independence as a 16-year-old living with my sister in Sydney.

5. Considering the innumerable electronic media avenues open to you – blogs, online newspapers, TV, radio, etc – why have you chosen to write a book? aren’t they obsolete?

It is a perfect complement to ALL of the above. Some of us still love the touch, feel and smell of a newly printed book……I am also an avid blogger, reader of online articles, and enjoy being a guest or host on TV, radio, podcast, webinars, and other multi-media …. bring it on!

6. Please tell us about your latest book…

Intentional Parenting How to Get Results for Both You and Your Kids  was written as a conversation with the reader who may have had some concerns like me. You see, I was initially a reluctant parent because I thought I was totally fulfilled in my career and needed nothing more. The perfectionist in me erroneously hypothesised that I had to subtract other parts of my life to be able to do parenting properly. Until my decision to be less concerned about being the perfect parent but to be the observant learner of my children did I find I could not only love and support them to be the best human beings they can be, but it simultaneously paved the way for me to re-discover the genius in me. I am excited to share my learning insights on this personal transformational journey -and hoped readers will find this a useful piece to reflect on.

Click here to buy Intentional Parenting from Booktopia,
Australia’s Local Bookstore

7. If your work could change one thing in this world – what would it be?

Be the best human being you can be – don’t short-change the world by selfishly keeping your genius hidden and unexpressed.

8. Whom do you most admire and why?

My parents, Jerry and Alice Sum. It is through their Role Modelling that “Parents are Leaders”. It was always a learning partnership from the get-go. It took me to have my own children before it dawned upon me the ingenuity of their methods.

9. Many people set themselves very ambitious goals. What are yours?

Be the best human being I can be – so I don’t short-change the world by selfishly keeping my genius hidden and unexpressed.

10. What advice do you give aspiring writers?

Be clear of your outcome: What do you want?

Take action: Just Do It!

Be alert: Observe keenly the results of your actions.

Keep measuring: Make sure the results are on track with your outcome.

Be flexible: You may need to change actions to get your outcome.

Manage your energy:

Passion + Persistence + Perspiration = Inspirational Outcome

____________________________

Dr. Yvonne Sum, thank you for playing.

Click here to buy Intentional Parenting from Booktopia,
Australia’s Local Bookstore

What do you make of Alain de Botton’s Ten Commandments for Atheists?

Alain de Botton (468 x 664)

CLICK TO ENLARGE

Click here to buy Alain de Botton's Religion for AtheistsReligion for Atheists: A non-believer’s guide to the uses of religion

by Alain De Botton

A non-believer’s guide to the uses of religion

All of us, whether religious, agnostic or atheist, are searching for meaning. And in this wise and life-affirming book, non-believer Alain de Botton both rejects the supernatural claims of religion and points out just how many good ideas they sometimes have about how we should live.

And he suggests that non-believers can learn and steal from them.

Picking and choosing from the thousands of years of advice assembled by the world’s great religions to get practical insights on art, community, love, friendship, work, life and death, Alain de Botton will show us a range of fascinating ideas on topics including relationships, work, culture, love and death – that could be of use to all of us, irrespective of whether we do or don’t believe.

‘A serious and optimistic set of practical ideas that could improve and alter the way we live.’ Jeanette Winterson, The Times

‘There isn’t a page in this book that doesn’t contain a striking idea or a stimulating parallel.’ Mail on Sunday

‘Packed with tantalizing goads to thought and playful prompts to action.’ Independent

‘Smart, stimulating, sensitive. A timely and perceptive appreciation of how much wisdom is embodied in religious traditions and how we godless moderns might learn from it.’ Financial Times

‘Beautifully written . . . de Botton is enjoying himself here, and we should take him in good humour.’ Evening Standard

‘Surprisingly illuminating.’ Church Times

Click here to buy Religion for Atheists from Booktopia, Australia’s Local Bookstore

Manon, author of Unzipped: How to Have the Hottest Sex of Your Life, answers Ten Terrifying Questions

 Click here for more details or to buy...The Booktopia Book Guru asks

Manon

author of Unzipped: How to Have the Hottest Sex of Your Life

Ten Terrifying Questions

 —————————–

1. To begin with why don’t you tell us a little bit about yourself – where were you born? Raised? Schooled?

I was born in Sydney at 3 am – a mischievous time to be born. As a baby, I relished eating dirt and held an inquisitive yet shy disposition. My shy demeanour as a young girl did not catapult me into the realms of super model stardom when I started modelling during school, I felt more comfortable behind the camera winning the photographers’ prize at school. I lived in Manhattan for three years after graduating from fashion design college and worked as a fashion assistant for Vogue, Allure and Mademoiselle and, yes, working for Anna Wintour is unerringly like the movie The Devil Wears Prada.

I have recently returned to Sydney from Los Angeles, living in one of Charlie Chaplin’s 1920s treehouses, where he used to house his Hollywood starlets. It was where I wrote Unzipped. I have sadly experienced much tragedy as both my sisters have passed – death is so cruel to everyone involved, and not a day goes by without thinking about how much I miss them; I feel awkward without them. I have a French Bijon Frise/Poodle called Shadow – a human dog of sorts who loves to try to make me jealous by flirting with my girlfriends (he is a lot like my ex-boyfriend, actually!). I like to dream and create, which is lucky, as I am writer.

I am also very fortunate to surrounded by so many magnificent friends that I feel truly loved and supported. My love of writing and experiencing life’s twists and turns and turn-ons is my vocation so stay tuned-in for my next novel.Author: Manon Youdale

2. What did you want to be when you were twelve, eighteen and thirty? And why?

I had no idea what I wanted to be at 12 but I had already written my first children’s novel and an autobiography.
At 18 I wanted to be a successful businesswoman but could not decide on which industry.
At 30 I felt a bit lost as to my life’s purpose, until I tapped into my inner 12-year-old and began my research for Unzipped. I realised then that I am happiest when I’m writing.

3. What strongly held belief did you have at eighteen that you do not have now?

At 12, I trusted my gut instincts, which became my code of honour. My code kept me strong, as I knew what I believed in was right for me. Along the way outside influences allowed me to stray from my code and path. Today I follow my original code and no one will ever change that.

4. What were three big events – in the family circle or on the world stage or in your reading life, for example – you can now say, had a great effect on you and influenced you in your career path?

Event 1) Being named Manon. My name ignited a sharpened interest to write and research about the wonderful world of seduction and sensuality.
Event 2) Breaking up with my fiancé, who had discouraged me from following my dreams and writing Unzipped.
3) Being published by Random House Australia, who believed in my dreams.

5. Considering the innumerable electronic media avenues open to you – blogs, online newspapers, TV, radio, etc – why have you chosen to write a book? aren’t they obsolete?

Tradition is important to me and books are tangible, tactile and they feel beautiful between one’s fingertips. I also receive immense joy seeing my name and book cover in a store window, which will also live on the shelves of libraries for future readers – the internet cannot offer that sensation of touch.

6. Please tell us about your latest book…

Click here for more details or to buy...I wanted to understand what makes women irresistible to men and to explore what a young woman could achieve if she spent time awakening her femininity and tapping into her sensuality: will she enjoy life and love much more than if she were to neglect her desires out of shame or fear?

Unzipped teaches women to treat themselves with respect and shows them how to get the most out of their bodies and relationships. My material comes from years sharing saucy secrets with amazing women and men and by watching, asking, experimenting, discussing and formulating tips and tricks. It’s fun, it’s serious and it’s essential.

(BBGuru: publisher’s blurb – Mmmm. Let’s talk about sex . . .

Unleash the sexy, modern woman within yourself and discover a world of sensuality and sexual pleasure that will drive you and your partner wild.

This little book of treasures unlocks your feminine sex appeal and introduces you to the fine art of seduction – for maximum effect.

Pearls of wisdom to keep you ahead of the sexy pack include:
– Sustaining a healthy mind and body;
– Developing a powerful yet feminine confidence;
– Boosting your sex appeal;
– How to become a sensual goddess;
– Playing out your innermost sexual fantasies;
– The ultimate orgasm and much, much more.

Unzipped will have you swinging your hips like a supermodel, whispering those naughty one-liners, looking the part and owning your sexiness. Tune in, turn on and make out.)

Click here to buy Unzipped from Booktopia,
Australia’s Local Bookstore

7. If your work could change one thing in this world – what would it be?

To empower all women – to help them love themselves for who they are, and to equip them with the tools to embrace their individual sensuality.Click here for more details or to buy...

8. Whom do you most admire and why?

Beyoncé. She is hard-working, composed, loving, cheeky, sexy, true to herself and has stuck to her dreams. An inspirational woman.

9. Many people set themselves very ambitious goals. What are yours?

My immediate goal is to finish the novel I am working on, fall in love, bear two children. I also want to write a TV sitcom and a perhaps a movie or two.

10. What advice do you give aspiring writers?

Ask yourself: what is the essence of who you are? Is there a story that you want to share? If so, dictate your thoughts, write them down, form chapters and get published. Have fun, give back and make your literary mark in history.

Manon, thank you for playing.

Click here to buy Unzipped from Booktopia,
Australia’s Local Bookstore

Amanda Hooton, author of Finding Mr Darcy, answers Ten Terrifying Questions

The Booktopia Book Guru asks

Amanda Hooton

author of Finding Mr Darcy

Ten Terrifying Questions

—————————

1. To begin with why don’t you tell us a little bit about yourself – where were you born? Raised? Schooled?

I was born in the great gold mining town – albeit unknown to Jane Austen – of Kalgoorlie in WA. I was brought up in an assortment of mining towns, went to high school in Perth, and university at St Andrews in Scotland; the same university Prince William attended, though he was there many years after I left, alas.

2. What did you want to be when you were twelve, eighteen and thirty? And why?

I suspect I wanted to be a three day eventer at 12 (I was a rabid pony book reader, and International Velvet was my favourite movie); the chatelaine of a large country estate at 18 (thanks to, yes, Jane Austen) and a New Yorker writer at 30. As a journalist, it seemed (and still seems) the alpha and omega of all things journalism-related.

3. What strongly held belief did you have at eighteen that you do not have now?

I think I thought I could make the universe bend to my will when I was 18. Several life lessons since then have taught me that occasionally, things do happen in life that you can’t control.

4. What were three big events – in the family circle or on the world stage or in your reading life, for example – you can now say, had a great effect on you and influenced you in your career path?

My first editor gave me a book called The New Journalism that convinced me of the magic and power and fun of writing for a living.

I won an award at the British Press Awards, that convinced me that perhaps I could write for a living.

After nearly two decades in journalism, writing this book has given me a whole new sense of enjoyment about writing for a living.

5. Considering the innumerable electronic media avenues open to you – blogs, online newspapers, TV, radio, etc – why have you chosen to write a book? aren’t they obsolete?

I spend my life reading books. If they are obsolete, I’m afraid, so am I!

6. Please tell us about your latest book…

It is, alas, a sort of self-help book. It’s based on the premise that everything you need to know about love and relationships you can learn from Jane Austen. And in fact, I think I actually believe this to be true – which is just as well…

7. If your work could change one thing in this world – what would it be?

Good grief. Halt global warming? Prevent cruelty to animals and small children? Stop the destruction of the world’s remaining wilderness? If people could just get a few hours of enjoyment, and perhaps even a small strategy or two to try next time they’re trying to chat up a bloke in a pub from my book, I’d be thrilled..

8. Whom do you most admire and why?

Good grief again. I really admire Jane Austen. She had in many ways a difficult path in life – little money, few avenues for advancement or achievement, no traditional support structures such as husbands or children – yet she managed to walk it with great grace and style and (most importantly) humour. Plus, you know, become one of the greatest writers in the canon of English Literature, of course.

9. Many people set themselves very ambitious goals. What are yours?

To get my garden bed to grow something other than weeds, and to organise my drawers with those drawer divider baskets from Ikea.

10. What advice do you give aspiring writers?

Read.

Amanda, thank you for playing.

Click here to buy Finding Mr Darcy from Booktopia,
Australia’s Local Bookstore

VIDEO INTERVIEW: Caroline Baum talks to Judith Lucy – Australia Funniest Spiritual Guide

DRINK, SMOKE, PASS OUT – An Unlikely Spiritual Journey

by Judith Lucy

Caroline Baum: I wasn’t sure whether Judith Lucy’s deadpan drollery would work as well on the page as it does in her stand up shows and TV series. But the good news is it does. She had me giggling helplessly in chapter one, and it doesn’t let up.

She doesn’t spare herself. In fact she lays herself bare in all her drunken mess as she stumbles and staggers her way towards spiritual enlightenment. Intoxicated, needy, confused, vulnerable and endowed with a heightened sense of absurdity which just about rescues her from toppling over the edge, she is raw in her revelations without it ever feeling ickily self-indulgent as it would if she were some gushy over-sharing US soapie star .

You don’t have to be on a search for meaning or interested in religious belief to find this highly entertaining – sceptics and heathens included.

Blurb: At last, a book about life that discusses liquor and lovemaking as much as it does the point of it all.

Judith Lucy has looked everywhere for happiness. Growing up a Catholic, she thought about becoming a nun, and later threw herself into work, finding a partner and getting off her face. Somehow, none of that worked.

So lately, she’s been asking herself the big questions. Why are we here? Is there a God? What happens when we die? And why can’t she tell you what her close friends believe in, but she can tell you which ones have herpes? No-one could have been more surprised than Judith when she started to find solace and meaning in yoga and meditation, and a newfound appreciation for what others get from their religion.

In her first volume of memoir, the bestselling The Lucy Family Alphabet, Judith dealt with her parents. In Drink, Smoke, Pass Out, she tries to find out if there’s more to life than wanting to suck tequila out of Ryan Gosling’s navel. With disarming frankness and classic dry wit, she reviews the major paths of her life and, alarmingly, finds herself on a journey.

Click here to buy Drink, Smoke, Pass Out from Booktopia,
Australia’s Local Bookstore

The Avengers of Self-help: Alain de Botton’s posse give us the School of Life series

Click here for more details or to orderAlain de Botton‘s School of Life series is determined to reinvigorate and rehabilitate the self-help genre. Alain, as we know, has done a great deal towards achieving this goal himself. His entertaining and informative guides to life – Religion for Atheists, How Proust Can Change Your Life, The Pleasures and Sorrows of Work – have lead many to re-examine their lives and helped them make slight adjustments to ensure they get the most out of their particular circumstances.

Now Alain has called in some of the brightest minds writing and teaching today to help him. Think of them as The Avengers of self-help… Maybe not. (It was worth a shot.)

Click here to buy Alain’s volume
How to Think More About Sex

Click here to view the entire School of Life series

From The School of Life website: There is no more ridiculed literary genre than the self-help book. It wasn’t always like this.  For two thousand years in the history of the west, the self-help book stood as a pinnacle of literary achievement.

The Ancients were particularly adept practitioners. Epicurus wrote some three-hundred self-help books on almost every topic, including On Love, On Justice and On Human Life. The Stoic philosopher Seneca wrote volumes advising his fellow Romans to cope with anger (the still very readable On Anger), how to deal with the death of a child (Consolation to Marcia) and how to overcome political and financial disgrace (Letter to Lucilius). It is no injustice to describe Marcus Aurelius’ Meditations as one of the finest works of self-help ever written, as relevant to someone facing a financial meltdown as the disintegration of an empire.

The assumption behind this long tradition was that the words of others can benefit us not only by giving us practical advice, but also – and more subtly – by recasting our private confusions and grief into eloquent communal sentences.  We feel at once less alone and less afraid.

With the growing secularisation of society, it is presumed that the modern individual should manage the business of living and dying by relying on sheer common sense, a good accountant, a sympathetic doctor and hearty doses of faith in science.  As citizens of the future we aren’t supposed to need lectures on how to stay calm and free of anxiety.

But we need self-help books like never before, and that is why The School of Life is proud to announce the launch of our new guides for everyday living:  a series of six intelligent, rigorous, well-written self-help books, put together by some of the leading minds in the field.  In these, we systematically examine some of the great issues of life – work, sex, money, emotional maturity, digital life and changing the world.


How to Think More About Sex
by Alain de Botton

View your sex life in a different light and learn how it can make you happier.

Sex is the most intimately human experience there is. It can also be the most confusing. Our desire to be together conflicts with our desire to avoid vulnerability and appear “normal”, leaving us detached, desensitised or embarrassed.

Covering topics including adultery, lust, pornography and impotence, Alain de Botton argues that 21st century sex will always be a balancing act of trust versus risk, and of primal desire versus studied civility. By examining sex from a subjective – rather than scientific – perspective, he uncovers new ideas on how we can achieve that balance.

Pulling back the sheets on modern sexuality, How To Think More About Sex offers important and surprising wisdom that proves that being good in bed is really all in your head.

About the Author

Alain de Botton is the author of the international bestsellers, How Proust Can Change Your Life, Essays in Love and The Art of Travel, and other books that try to throw light on the big challenges of our lives. He is the founder of Living Architecture (www.living-architecture.co.uk), a social enterprise which gets top architects to build holiday homes for rental by anyone. He is also the founder of The School of Life, for which this series has been designed.

Click here to buy


How to Change the World

How To Change The World combines insights from Tolstoy, Gandhi and Sartre and outlines a refreshing theory of political power, giving examples of successful non-violent action from across the world, from the start of recorded history to the present day. Of course, we don’t all need to topple dictators, but any attempt to change the status quo requires us to overcome inertia, indifference and perhaps active hostility from people who feel threatened.

This book explores the idea that we can break down our goals into small pieces, and highlights that there will never be a better time to start. Bursting with ideas, this book will give you a sense of what might just be possible, as well as the inspiration and the courage you need to go about improving and changing the world we live in.

About the Author

John-Paul Flintoff is an author, writer and broadcaster. His FT magazine story about Camilla Batmangehelidjh, founder of the London-based charity, Kids Company, helped to change government policy, and the late Nobel winner Harold Pinter said of Flintoff’s work that it was “very good, very funny…in fact, it made me laugh”.

Click here to buy


How to Stay Sane

A handbook to console, nourish and gently lead us on the path to emotional balance.

There is no simple set of instructions that can guarantee sanity, but if you want to overcome emotional difficulties and become happier, psychotherapist Philippa Perry argues that there are four cornerstones to sanity you can influence to bring about change. By developing your self-observation skills, examining how you relate to others, breaking out of your comfort zone and exploring new ways of defining yourself, she suggests ways of getting over your problems and feeling more “normal”.

This book explores techniques to help you find emotional equilibrium, such as practising mindfulness, being emotionally honest in your relationships with others, challenging your brain in new and exciting ways, and finding cause for optimism. Through case studies, practical exercises and stories of individual experience, this insightful and inspirational book reaches out to anyone in need of a little emotional support from time to time.

About the Author

Philippa Perry is a psychotherapist who, in an attempt to demystify psychotherapy, wrote the graphic novel, Couch Fiction. She has written for The Guardian, the Observer, Time Out and Healthy Living magazine and has a column in Psychologies magazine. She lives in London and Sussex with her husband, the artist Grayson Perry and enjoys gardening, cooking, parties, walking, tweeting (@philippa_perry) and watching telly.

Click here to buy


How to Worry Less About Money

Break free of your destructive relationship with money, and learn how money can make you happy.

Our relationship with money is one that lasts a lifetime. It can be as important as family life, as competitive as work, and as exciting and secretive as love. Yet books about money tend to take one of two routes: a) how to get more, or b) how to deal with less.

This book turns these questions upside down, and looks not at money itself, but at the way we view it. How does money drive us? How does it frighten us? And how can it help us make sense of who we are?

Money is too important a part of life for us not to worry about, but by approaching it differently, we can change the way we perceive its worth. With surprising and enlightening new insights, How to Worry Less About Money will help you realise what material wealth really means.

About the Author

John Armstrong is Philosopher in Residence at the Melbourne Business School and Senior Advisor to the Vice-Chancellor of Melbourne University. He is the author of several internationally acclaimed books on art, aesthetics and philosophy, including In Search of Civilization, Conditions of Love: The Philosophy of Intimacy, Love, Life, Goethe: How to be Happy in an Imperfect World, and The Secret Power of Beauty.

Click here to buy


How to Find Fulfilling Work

This is a book about how to take working life in new directions – how to negotiate the labyrinth of choices, how to think about personal ambitions and motivations, and ultimately how to take concrete steps to finding a fulfilling career. It is a self-help book with a difference. Standard career guides are filled with pop psychology and bullet-point advice for writing CVs and making action plans, but How to Find Fulfilling Work casts its net wider. While not ignoring the insights of psychology or the need for practical planning, it reveals wisdom about work found in sociology, history, literature, film and philosophy.

It may be a false illusion that there is some perfect dream job out there for us, an ideal calling or vocation. But this book is premised on the idea that it is possible to find work that is life-enhancing. This is a book that inspires as much as it instructs and will aid self-reflection about the wider quest of how to live a good life.

About the Author

Roman Krznaric is a co-founder of The School of Life, where he teaches courses about work. He has been named by the Observer as one of Britain’s leading lifestyle thinkers, and advises organisations including Oxfam and the United Nations on using empathy and conversation to create social change.

Click here to buy


How to Thrive in the Digital Age

Over the last decade, through digital media, we have crossed a number of significant thresholds: the interconnection of over half of the world’s adult population through mobile telephony and the internet and the devotion of more than half the waking hours of a western generation to mediated experience.

Yet little mainstream thought has been given to what these transitions signify for the business of daily living; and what thought there has been too often focuses on grand claims of loss or gain.

This book asks what it means not simply to live within a digital century, but to live well with it and within it. Unlike most other contemporary accounts, it is neither a tale of technology doom nor glory, but a pragmatic guide to what questions we need to ask of the world around us; what it might mean to answer these; and what practical steps might allow us all both to choose and to use the tools at our disposal, and to live within a digital century in as fully human a sense as possible.

About the Author

Tom Chatfield is an author, commentator and technology theorist. He has written books on the culture of video gaming, new media and politics and the history of digital ideas. Tom has done design, writing and consultancy work for games and new media companies including Google, Six to Start and Intervox, and has spoken at forums including TED Global, the RSA and the World IT Congress. For more, see http://www.tomchatfield.net

Click here to buy


Click here to view the School of Life series

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