JAI HO! Caroline Baum on The Jaipur Writers Festival

Booktopia’s Editorial Director Caroline Baum writes about her whirlwind trip to the legendary Jaipur Writers Festival

———————–

Every winter writers’ festival needs a chai wallah: a turbanned young man dispensing spicy hot milky cardamom and ginger flavoured tea served in terracotta cups (in the spirit of PM Narendra Modi’s efforts to clean up India, there is no plastic at this festival) before sessions get underway. The air in Jaipur is dry and chilly in January, though the day warms up soon enough under the billowing folds of the block printed canopies of the tents at Diggi Palace.

The other reason for the tea is to calm you after the trauma of the traffic jam that causes a daily surge in your blood pressure. A chaotic entanglement and near collision of tuk tuks, scooters, cars, and the odd elephant or horse (because it is wedding season and these are the transport of choice for grooms). The machines make more noise than a jungle full of wildlife, as everyone fights for lane supremacy. It is incredibly enervating, but one of the strokes of brilliance of the festival put together by William Dalrymple and Sanjoy Roy is a program of live music to kick off proceedings which restores everyone’s mood to a serene level.

Margaret Atwood delivers the keynote address

Each morning Sanjoy stands like a sentinel at the flower garlanded fountain at the centre of the venue, his long silver hair sitting smoothly below his shoulders, conferring on him the impression of a Sergeant Pepper album cover extra, greeting all and sundry with hands clasped together in the traditional Namaste or a hug. This gesture of welcome and hospitality is hard to beat. How the hell is he not running around in a flurry of last minute crisis management? When I ask he smiles enigmatically and says ‘ My job is done. Now all I have to do is stay out of jail,’ presumably referring to last minute litigation which put the festival’s access to the site in doubt till the very last minute. This is India, after all.

Diggi Palace is a vast site embracing several venues. The first festival event nine years ago which attracted an audience of fourteen people took place in the saffron painted Durbar Hall. Today everyone loves saying they are going to something at the Google Mughal tent because it trips off the tongue so pleasingly, but the superstar action is mostly on the front lawn under softly gathered folds of blue and white cotton. Capacity crowds meant standing room only for Margaret Atwood, Colm Toibin, Stephen Fry, and, biggest of all, French economist Thomas Piketty (Capital in the Twenty-First Century), who was the first and last drawcard on one day, talking about inequality. (The only person who may have drawn a bigger crowd in the festival’s exuberant history is Oprah Winfrey, who caused a near stampede and pleased the Delhi ladies in attendance by wearing a sari, a gesture Monsieur Piketty could not compete with.)

And talking of inequality, there is a terrific rule at the festival: everyone is treated the same, without exception. No matter whether you are a writer or a delegate (ie you paid to eat in an exclusive area and have access to slightly better loos) or a sponsor, or even a festival director, seats are allocated on a first come first served basis and you cannot hold them for other people (when Delhi princesses do this by sending their drivers or retainers to sit in the best seats, appearing in all their finery at a later hour for some celebrity writer, disapproval ruffles the crowd like a foul smelling breeze.)

Stephen Fry

Stephen Fry

Lunch is a logistical miracle. If you are one of the hundreds of delegates, you have access to another canopied area and a magnificent buffet of Indian dishes, all in plentiful supply. There is no need to queue and nothing runs out. An oven bakes at full tilt, its glowing wood-fired furnace producing parathas, naans and rotis. Pestles grind herbs for freshly made chutneys and sambals of mint and coriander. Desert is churned rose petal ice cream. You sit wherever you like and find yourself having intense conversations with delegates who may be writers, publishers, or passionate readers from Peshawar, Mumbai, Dubai, Toronto and Melbourne. The atmosphere is one of immediate congeniality and vigourous discussion. The place hums like a hive of bookish bees.

As for the one hundred and seventy five sessions running in parallel at six venues (where the size of the crowds over the weekend meant you had to allow fifteen minutes to get from one tent to another; with a surprising strong male presence Australian festivals would kill for and, last year, an average attendance age of 21), the breadth and calibre of writers and the careful curation of sessions is a veritable banquet of the best and emerging talent from across India and the world. Choosing is not easy.

In a session on the British art of biography the quartet assembled was unbeatable: Hannah Rothschild talking about her eccentric great aunt Panonica’s relationship with Thelonious Monk in The Baroness; Ben McIntyre discussing A Spy Among Friends, his new book on Kim Philby (he had audiences spellbound at several sessions); Victoria Glendinning being generous and funny about her new biography of the British founder of modern Singapore, Stanford Thomas Raffles, with Labour MP Tristram Hunt bringing Friedrich Engels to life in Marx’s General.

Other delegates went into raptures about William Dalrymple and Alexander McCall Smith’s raconteur double act, outdoing each other with funny stories like seasoned pros; there was a great fizz around Colm Toibin talking with Armistead Maupin about all things gay with Indian writer R. Raj Rao. On Monday the crowds thinned for a day of more politically focussed discussion of which highlights were a session called From Abu Ghraib to Guantanamo with Laleh Khallil (Time in the Shadows) and Molly Crabapple, Niall Ferguson on Henry Kissinger, and a very measured debate on freedom of speech with seven major Indian writers. Colin Thubron was there to talk travel while Vanity Fair writers Alex Shoumatoff and Marie Brenner analysed the renaissance of long form journalism. Atul Gawande moved audiences to tears putting a very personal Indian spin on his bestselling Being Mortal, with his mother sitting in the front row of his sessions while he shared his latest research about healthcare needs in India (where the fastest growing sector of public health is nursing homes, bucking the traditional trend of families living inter-generationally and the young looking after the elderly). Marlon James’s red leather jacket added to his rock star charisma as he held audiences spellbound talking about A Brief History of Seven Killings.

Marlon James

Marlon James

Only one session failed to get to the heart of the matter with too many stars squeezed on to the stage: the cleverly named Selfie featured discussions on the memoir with Stephen Fry, Helen Macdonald, Brigid Keenan, Christina Lamb and Esther Freud – a veritable galaxy, but with insufficient time to shine. Photographers Don McCullin and Steve McCurry added another layer to the program with presentations that emphasized the visual. Poetry and ancient texts were given prime time centre stage slots. Shakespeare, Oscar Wilde, Gandhi and Pakistan got their moment in the sun. Bollywood made a glamorous appearance. The bookshop (superbly stocked independent Full Circle restored to its traditional role after last year’s outcry when the concession was given to Amazon) did a roaring trade. Rumour has it that attendances reached somewhere near a quarter of a million (including sizeable school and student contingents, with many questions being prefaced by the words ‘I am doing my PhD on your work ….’)

There were swank parties off site at palatial hotels and private homes, and time for short forays into the old city to shop for gemstones and textiles and visit the purdah chambers of the Wind Palace and the staggering Jantar Mantar 17th century observatory. But you didn’t need an observatory to locate the stars during the day: their light shone clear and bright.

Caroline Baum travelled to the Jaipur Literature Festival with the assistance of India Tourism and Marieke’s Art of Living (www.mariekesartofliving.com).

BOOK REVIEW: Salt Creek by Lucy Treloar (Review by Caroline Baum)

salt-creekTreloar’s intensely dramatic saga of the downfall of a family settled on the edge of the Coorong is a welcome and fresh take on the well-trodden territory of narratives of colonial hardship.

First of all, she captures the little known beauty of that remote watery place perfectly. Her ability to conjure up its landscape, once shared with the local Narandjeri Aborigines, is a reminder that it is a hard place to farm now, just as it was then. Secondly, the story she tells is utterly compelling and almost mythic, such are the powerful forces unleashed on the family of misguided pastor Finch as told by his endlessly forbearing daughter Hester.

When light skinned Aboriginal boy Tull befriends the Finch family, he is welcomed into their home to share their meals and conversations. But while curious about white culture, Tull remains proud of his own. ‘Don’t you have any stories?’ he asks pointedly one day (They direct him to the Bible). On another, he remarks that he considers all white people ugly. When the Pastor muddies his tribe’s waterholes, there is consternation. When he chops down a venerable tree, the question of who owns the land is a source of more discord, a rumbling thunder that must eventually break into a storm.

Treloar calibrates these little moments of tension with impeccable judgment, never overplaying them, though she signposts a grim outcome early on, warning the reader to brace themselves for disaster. Which makes the cumulative impact of this unconventional relationship, balancing trust and mistrust, so devastating when things begin to go wrong. The Pastor is not as principled and high minded as he might wish and has no head for business: all his ventures end in debt, with increasingly terrible consequences. When Tull forms a close bond with Hester’s youngest sister Addie, Hester refuses to see what is under her nose. As the family fractures, torn apart by the pastor’s blind unbending values and his hypocrisy, Hester tries to hold everything together.

She is a fascinating creation: full of contradictions, overwhelmed by an eldest daughter’s sense of duty following her mother’s early death while longing to be free and independent. Seemingly uninterested in personal attachment, she fights her own nature and impulses when drawn to a visiting artist explorer. Their moment of romantic intimacy on a shell beach is again understated and restrained, sensual but unsentimental.

The novel builds to a climax that avoids melodrama, but is charged with high emotion and tension to the very last chapter.

Grab your copy of Salt Creek here!


Salt Creek

Lucy Treloar

salt-creekSome things collapse slow, and cannot always be rebuilt, and even if a thing can be remade it will never be as it was.

Salt Creek, 1855, lies at the far reaches of the remote, beautiful and inhospitable coastal region, the Coorong, in the new province of South Australia. The area, just opened to graziers willing to chance their luck, becomes home to Stanton Finch and his large family, including fifteen-year-old Hester Finch.

Once wealth political activists, the Finch family has fallen on hard times. Cut adrift from the polite society they were raised to be part of, Hester and her siblings make connections where they can: with the few travellers that pass along the nearby stock route – among them a young artist … Read more.

Grab your copy of Salt Creek here!

BOOK REVIEW: R&R by Mark Dapin (Review by Caroline Baum)

r-rBlam! Author hits target with a bullseye.

Former magazine columnist Mark Dapin has become The War Guy (his military history The Nashos’ War was widely acclaimed) and this novel confirms that status and a whole lot more. I’ll admit when I came to this Vietnam War story about two Military Police – one a seen-it-all hard-drinking womanising American, and one a naïve but very tall Australian with reservations: I didn’t fancy being immersed in that macho violent brutal crude world. But I was wrong, and knew it within the first twenty pages, which were bracingly alive with a heady mixture of bawdy humour and raw masculine energy.

Dapin writes with tremendous swagger (his style is a head-on collision of Steve Toltz and Joseph Heller). In Nashville and Shorty he’s created two memorable characters: an unlikely couple defined by physical and psychological contrasts that suggest they may become enemies. Instead, the very opposite happens and the story of their growing effect on each other unfolds in scenes that are taut and explosive with occasional moments of gentler comedy that allow you to regroup before the next skirmish – there’s a dinner seduction scene which Nashville orchestrates when Shorty takes his nurse girlfriend on a date that he pulls off with surprising delicacy (this is not a book full of subtlety) and good natured fun, creating an oasis of innocence in a narrative that is otherwise steeped in sleaze.

Rude, raw, crude, violent and shocking, this is as satisfying a mateship story as you could hope for if you like yours on the perverse end of the spectrum.

Grab your copy of R & R here!


R&R

Mark Dapin

r-rJohn ‘Nashville’ Grant is an American military policeman in the R&R town of Vung Tau, tucked safely behind the front lines of the Vietnam War. Nashville knows how everything works: the army, the enemy, bars, secrets, men and – at least in Vung Tau – women. He’s keeping the peace by keeping his head down and making the most of it.

His new partner is a tall man from a small town: Shorty, from Bendigo. Shorty knows nothing about anything, and he wishes people would stop mistaking that for stupidity.

When another MP shoots a corpse in a brothel, the delicate balance between the military police, South Vietnamese gangsters and the Viet Cong is upset. Nashville and his partner … Read more.

Grab your copy of R & R here!

BOOK REVIEW: The Heart Goes Last by Margaret Atwood (Review by Caroline Baum)

Canada’s literathe-heart-goes-lastry grande dame, Margaret Atwood, is the high priestess of dystopia. As its ruling authority, she invents plots that are devilish in their scary plausibility and disturbingly accurate in their critique of where today’s extremes will lead to if we are not hyper vigilant.

But she is a hugely entertaining and playful Cassandra, peppering her visions of future doom with witheringly sharp satirical dialogue and observation, making the experience of reading this slim but meaty novel doubly uneasy. One minute you are laughing at the pathetic naivety of Charmaine and Stan, a couple seduced into living in Consilience, a gated community to protect themselves from a ravaged society. The next you are wondering what moral decisions you would make under the circumstances they are faced with on the inside.

The scenario she devises to alert us to future danger hinges on the choice between freedom and security, between desires genuinely or artificially gratified. Yes, there is sex with robots.

Get your copy The Heart Goes Last here


The Heart Goes Last

by Margaret Atwood

Margaret Atwood

Margaret Atwood

Charmaine and Stan are young and in love. Victims of a growing divide between the haves and the have-nots, they struggle to keep their relationship alive in the face of increasing poverty. Now living in their car, they survive on tips from Charmaine’s job at filthy dive bar, until the day they see an advertisement for a social experiment offering security, community, and a break from the daily grind of their current existence…

Leaving behind the uncertainty of their former lives, they sign themselves up for the perfectly manicured lawns of Consilience, with its stable jobs and protection from the increasingly unruly and angry population outside its walls. All they have to do in return for this suburban paradise is give up their freedom every second month – with a voluntary imprisonment. But what seems at first to be a balancing act worth investing in for the safety of a permanent roof over their heads, soon turns into a nightmare of conformity, mistrust, guilt and sexual desire…

Brilliantly conceived and executed, with a pace that will leave you breathless, The Heart Goes Last is a powerful satire of life in the twenty-first century, charged throughout with Margaret Atwood’s signature devastating wit, irony and keen perception.

Get your copy The Heart Goes Last here


About the Author

Margaret Atwood was born in 1939 in Ottawa and grew up in northern Ontario, Quebec, and Toronto. She received her undergraduate degree from Victoria College at the University of Toronto the-handmaid-s-taleand her master’s degree from Radcliffe College.

Throughout her writing career, Margaret Atwood has received numerous awards and honourary degrees. She is the author of more than thirty-five volumes of poetry, children’s literature, fiction, and non-fiction and is perhaps best known for her novels, which include The Edible Woman (1970), The Handmaid’s Tale (1983), The Robber Bride (1994), Alias Grace (1996), and The Blind Assassin, which won the prestigious Booker Prize in 2000. Atwood’s dystopic novel, Oryx and Crake, was published in 2003. The Tent (mini-fictions) and Moral Disorder (short stories) both appeared in 2006.

Her most recent volume of poetry, The Door, was published in 2007. Her non-fiction book, Payback: Debt and the Shadow Side of Wealth ­ in the Massey series, appeared in 2008, and her most recent novel, The Year of the Flood, in the autumn of 2009.

Ms. Atwood’s work has been published in more than forty languages, including Farsi, Japanese, Turkish, Finnish, Korean, Icelandic and Estonian. In 2004 she co-invented the Long Pen TM.

Margaret Atwood currently lives in Toronto with writer Graeme Gibson.

Visit Margaret Atwood’s Booktopia Author Page

Rush Oh! by Shirley Barrett is Caroline Baum’s Book of the Month

9781743535943Booktopia’s Editorial Director, Caroline Baum reviews Shirley Barrett’s Rush Oh! which features in The Buzz as Caroline’s Book of the Month.

It’s unusual to move from writing films to writing novels. Most people try to go in the other direction. Shirley Barrett made her reputation with the film Lovesong Serenade, demonstrating her comic sensibility and ability to write characters that were both ordinary and slightly absurd. Now she’s turned a screenplay she had held on to for ten years into a briny novel about a small whaling community on the south coast of NSW.

Its flavour is both salty and sweet, thanks to the marvellously embodied voice of the narrator, Mary, the eldest child of the Davidson family, a dynasty of whalers at Eden on the NSW south coast who learned to work in unique unison with the local pod of killer whales.

The story is based on real life events: between 1840 and 1930 a pod of killer whales did indeed chase humpbacks into Twofold Bay, herding them into its waters where they were only interested in consuming their tongues, leaving the rest of their valuable carcasses to the hardy men of the town to boil down the blubber and process the whalebone.

Barrett’s evocation of the hunting scenes, based on accounts of the time, is especially vivid and really conveys the peril of the men and the terrible bloody agony of the whales. But what lifts Rush Oh! to another level is Mary’s singular voice: she is a somewhat spinsterish, a pedantically earnest and literal blue stocking who actually wears blue stockings, capable of making deadpan droll observations that would be quite at home in the work of Annie Proulx. Mary’s awkward flirtation with newcomer John Beck, a slightly mysterious preacher who joins her father’s whaling crew, offers plenty of scope to Barrett when it comes to gently mocking light-hearted fun.

Like Rosalie Ham, Barrett excels at small scale tightly-knit community with her miniaturist’s appreciation of the telling detail. She brings a fresh eye to a little known episode of Australian history with spirit and warm-hearted originality.

Photos of Shirley Barrett’s recent visit to Booktopia!

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

Grab a copy of Rush Oh! here
__________________

Caroline Baum has worked as founding editor of Good Reading magazine, features editor for Vogue, presenter of ABC TV’s popular bookshow, Between the Lines, and Foxtel’s Talking Books, and as an executive producer with ABC Radio National. She is currently Booktopia’s Editorial Director. For more reviews by Caroline – click here.


Rush Oh!

by Shirley Barrett

When the eldest daughter of a whaling family in Eden, New South Wales, sets out to chronicle the particularly difficult season of 1908, the story she tells is poignant and hilarious, filled with drama and misadventure.

Swinging from her own hopes and disappointments, both domestic and romantic, to the challenges that beset their tiny whaling operation, Mary’s tale is entirely relatable despite the hundred-odd years that separate her world from ours.

Chronicling her family’s struggle to survive the season and her own attempts to navigate an all-consuming crush on an itinerant whaleman with a more…

About the Author

Shirley Barrett is best known for her work as a screenwriter and director. Shirley’s first film, Love Serenade won the Camera D’Or (Best First Feature) at Cannes Film Festival in 1996. The script for her film South Solitary won the Queensland Premier’s Prize (script) 2010, the West Australian Premier’s Literary Prize (script) 2010, and the West Australian Premier’s Prize 2010. Rush Oh! is Shirley’s first novel. She lives in Sydney, Australia.

Grab a copy of Rush Oh! here

Salt Creek by Lucy Treloar is Caroline Baum’s Book of the Month

salt-creekBooktopia’s Editorial Director, Caroline Baum reviews Lucy Treloar’s Salt Creek which features in The Buzz as Caroline’s Book of the Month.

If, like me, you thought you did not need another story about hardship in colonial Australia, with the TV adaptation of The Secret River fresh in your mind, think again: Lucy Treloar’s intensely dramatic saga of the downfall of a family settled on the edge of the Coorong is a welcome and fresh take on the well-trodden territory of narratives of colonial hardship.

First of all, she captures the little known beauty of that remote watery place perfectly. Her ability to conjure up its landscape, once shared with the local Ngarrindjeri Aborigines, is a reminder that it is a hard place to farm now, just as it was then. Secondly, the story she tells is utterly compelling and almost mythic, such are the powerful forces unleashed on the family of misguided pastor Finch as told by his endlessly forbearing daughter Hester.

When light skinned Aboriginal boy Tull befriends the Finch family, he is welcomed into their home to share their meals and conversations. But while curious about white culture, Tull remains proud of his own. ‘Don’t you have any stories?’ he asks pointedly. (They direct him to the Bible) On another, he remarks that he considers all white people ugly. When the Pastor muddies his tribe’s waterholes, there is consternation. When he chops down a venerable tree, the question of who owns the land is a source of more discord, a rumbling thunder that must eventually break into a storm.

Treloar calibrates these little moments of tension with impeccable judgment, never overplaying them, though she signposts a grim outcome early on, warning the reader to brace themselves for disaster. We navigate the unconventional relationship between the Finches and Tull, balancing trust and mistrust, with mounting apprehension.

The Pastor is not as principled and high minded as he might wish and has no head for business: all his ventures end in debt, with increasingly terrible consequences. When Tull forms a close bond with Hester’s youngest sister Addie, Hester refuses to see what is under her nose. As the family fractures, torn apart by the pastor’s blind unbending values and his hypocrisy, Hester tries to hold everything together.

She is a fascinating creation: full of contradictions, overwhelmed by an eldest daughter’s sense of duty following her mother’s early death while longing to be free and independent. Seemingly uninterested in personal attachment, she fights her own nature and impulses when drawn to a visiting artist explorer. Their moment of romantic intimacy on a shell beach is again understated and restrained, sensual but unsentimental.

The novel builds to a climax that avoids melodrama, but is charged with high emotion and tension to the very last chapter.

Grab a copy of Salt Creek here
__________________

Caroline Baum has worked as founding editor of Good Reading magazine, features editor for Vogue, presenter of ABC TV’s popular bookshow, Between the Lines, and Foxtel’s Talking Books, and as an executive producer with ABC Radio National. She is currently Booktopia’s Editorial Director. For more reviews by Caroline – click here.


Salt Creek

by Lucy Treloar

Some things collapse slow, and cannot always be rebuilt, and even if a thing can be remade it will never be as it was.

Salt Creek, 1855, lies at the far reaches of the remote, beautiful and inhospitable coastal region, the Coorong, in the new province of South Australia. The area, just opened to graziers willing to chance their luck, becomes home to Stanton Finch and his large family, including fifteen-year-old Hester Finch.

Once wealth political activists, the Finch family has fallen on hard times. Cut adrift from the polite society they were raised to be part of, Hester and her siblings make more…

About the Author

Lucy Treloar was born in Malaysia and educated in Melbourne, England and Sweden. A graduate of the University of Melbourne and RMIT, Lucy is a writer and editor and has plied her trades both in Australia and in Cambodia, where she lived for a number of years. She has an abiding love for Southeast Asia, a region she retains links with through her editing work, which focuses on English language translations of a diverse range of material including folk tales and modern narrative forms.

Lucy is the 2014 Regional Winner of the Commonwealth Short Story Prize. In 2012 she won the Writing Australia Unpublished Manuscript Award for her first novel, The Things We Tell Ourselves, and went on to be awarded a Varuna Publisher Fellowship for the same work in 2013. In 2011 Lucy was the recipient of a mentorship through the Australian Society of Authors as well as an Asialink Writer’s Residency to Cambodia.

Her short fiction has appeared in Sleepers, Overland, Seizure, and Best Australian Stories 2013.

Grab a copy of Salt Creek here

GUEST BLOG: Caroline Baum on judging the Stella Prize

CaroJudging a literary prize is the one thing that no algorithm, no matter how sophisticated, can do. It is an intensely human and subjective endeavour. Now that the winner of this year’s Stella prize has been announced, I can say with complete honesty that this was the hardest prize I have ever judged: partly because of the sheer volume of books that we five judges had to read, in a relatively tight time frame, and partly because the quality of the books made it such a difficult process.

I spent a lot of this summer reading so intensely that on some days, I simply never got dressed. I taped the three criteria to my bedside table -original, excellent and engaging- and repeated them to myself like a mantra whenever I was unsure.

Some books snuck up on me unexpectedly, including a couple I had missed when they came out. One or two had completely failed to appear on my radar, causing me genuine concern: how could it be that I had overlooked them, when my role at Booktopia gives me the opportunity to see everything that’s out there? Answer: I’m human. An algorithm could come up with a formula that suggests what I might like based on previous preferences, but it won’t necessarily spot the book I failed to notice.

Judging for the Stella introduced me to some voices I will now follow with acute and sustained interest: Sofie Laguna and Biff Ward, I await your next books keenly.

As the process and the summer wore on, emails trickled through in the heat, becoming more urgent as deadlines neared. Oh the relief of realising some of my most fervently held enthusiasms were shared!

I thought of what it takes to do this as a kind of fitness, requiring muscle tone like a long distance athletic challenge. You need reading stamina to stay the course as well as lots of uninterrupted time.

When it came to whittling the longlist down to the shortlist, I read all twelve books again to get to six. There was no way round it. The revelations on re-reading were astounding and sometimes conviction-shaking – which just goes to show how much you miss when you are binge-reading, swallowing a book down without digesting it properly.

Our deliberations, when we finally came together on a warm day in Melbourne, were respectful, polite, fair but intense. Navigating towards the shore of consensus, we avoided the rocks of heated argument, all equally keen to avoid boiling it down to the simple, bald maths of a vote.

Being the first cab off the rank in the sequence of the year’s literary prizes is interesting: when the lists appear for prizes like the Miles Franklin it is surprising to see where you overlap and where you don’t.

I think it’s great for the vigour of the culture if one book does not scoop all the prizes, but it was surprising to see that our winner this year was not even longlisted for The Miles Franklin, given that The Strays certainly ticks the box when it comes to the vexed criterion of depicting an aspect of Australian life.

If Joan London wins it for The Golden Age, that would mean a pair of prestigious wins by two fine women writers who use language with similar precision, delicacy and maturity, despite the fact that one is making her debut, and the other is arguably one of our finest midcareer novelists. Both books about outsiders with heightened sensibilities, and which bring a fresh perspective to complex aspects of our past.

Caroline Baum is Booktopia’s Editorial Director, for which she produces The Booktopia Buzz. She also writes for the Sydney Morning Herald, Qantas in flight magazine, Slow Magazine, SBS Feast and other publications about books, food, travel, the arts, and aspects of contemporary life.

230914carolinebaumbuzzheader616+x123Check out Caroline’s Books of the Month in The Booktopia Buzz

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 15,961 other followers

%d bloggers like this: