Tamara Drew is a film of the graphic novel which was the compilation of the Guardian serial which was loosely based upon the great work of Thomas Hardy, Far from the Madding Crowd. Got that?

I shouldn’t mind being a bride at a wedding, if I could be one without having a husband.

Thomas Hardy – Far from the Madding Crowd


Tamara Drewe is a brilliant graphic novel inspired by Hardy’s Far From the Madding Crowd by Posy Simmonds the author of the widely acclaimed Gemma Bovery

Tamara Drewe has transformed herself. Plastic surgery, a different wardrobe, a smouldering look, have given her confidence and a new and thrilling power to attract, which she uses recklessly. Often just for the fun of it.

People are drawn to Tamara Drewe, male and female. In the remote village where her late mother lived Tamara arrives to clear up the house. Here she becomes an object of lust, of envy, the focus of unrequited love, a seductress. To the village teenagers she is ‘plastic-fantastic’, a role model. Ultimately, when her hot and indiscriminate glances lead to tragedy, she is seen as a man-eater and a heartless marriage wrecker.

First appearing as a serial in the Guardian, in book form Tamara Drewe has been enlarged, embellished and lovingly improved by the author.

Click here to see inside this book…

By all means, see the film and read the graphic novel but, please, make sure you read the original, too.

Bathsheba Everdene arrives in the small village of Weatherbury and captures the heart of three very different men; Gabriel Oak, a quiet shepherd, the proud, obdurate Farmer Boldwood and dashing, unscrupulous Sergeant Troy.

The battle for her affections will have dramatic, tragic and surprising consequences in this classic tale of love and misunderstanding.

It may have been observed that there is no regular path for getting out of love as there is for getting in. Some people look upon marriage as a short cut that way, but it has been known to fail

and…

We learn that it is not the rays which bodies absorb, but those they reject that give them the colours they are known by, and in the same way people are specialized by their dislikes and antagonisms whilst their goodwill is looked upon as no attribute at all.

Far From the Madding Crowd

Pause: Far from the Madding Crowd by Thomas Hardy

To persons standing alone on a hill during a clear midnight such as this – the roll of the world eastward is almost a palpable movement. The sensation may be caused by the panoramic glide of the stars past earthly objects, which is perceptible in a few minutes of stillness; or by a fancy that the better outlook upon space afforded by a hill emphasizes terrestrial revolution; or by the wind; or by the solitude; but whatever be its origin the impression of riding along is vivid and abiding.

The poetry of motion is a phrase much in use, and to enjoy the epic form of that gratification it is necessary to stand on a hill at a small hour of the night, and, first enlarging the consciousness with a sense of difference from the mass of civilized mankind, who are horizontal and disregardful of all such proceedings at this time, long and quietly watch your stately progress through the stars.

After such a nocturnal reconnoitre among these astral clusters, aloft from the customary haunts of thought and vision, some men may feel raised to a capability for eternity at once.

Thomas Hardy – Far from the Madding Crowd.

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