Kate Forsyth, author of The Wild Girl, Bitter Greens and more, answers Five Facetious Questions

the-wild-girlThe Booktopia Book Guru asks

Kate Forsyth

author of The Wild Girl, Bitter Greens
and many, many more…

Five Facetious Questions

1. Every writer spends at least one afternoon going from bookshop to bookshop making sure his or her latest book is facing out and neatly arranged. How far have you gone to draw attention to your own books in a shop?

I’ve trained every member of my family, from my mother to my youngest child, to turn my books cover outwards … not to mention the sneaky transfer to the Bestsellers shelf.

2. So you’re a published author, almost a minor celebrity and for some reason you’ve been let into a party full of ‘A-listers’ – what do you do?

Enjoy myself.

3. Some write because they feel compelled to, some are Artists and do it for the Muse, some do it for the cash (one buck twenty a book) and some do it because they think it makes them more attractive to the opposite sex – why do you do write? (NB: don’t say -‘cause I can’t sing, tap or paint!) Kate by tree sml

Because its my one true destiny. Trust me, you don’t do it for the cash!

4. Have you ever come to the end of writing a particularly fine paragraph, paused momentarily, chuffed with your own genius, only to find you’ve been sitting at the computer nude or with your dress half-way over your head or shaving cream on your face or toilet paper sticking out the back of your undies or paused to find that you’re singing We are the Champions at the top of your voice, having exchanged the words ‘we are’ for ‘I am’ and dropping an ‘s’?

No? Well, what’s your most embarrassing writing moment?

I often find myself writing half-nude … thanks to flashes of inspiration in the middle of the night … perhaps I should wear more to bed.

5. Rodin placed his thinker on the loo – where and/or when do you seem to get your best ideas?

A lot of my best ideas comes to me as dreams. I also like to walk every morning, as a kind of meditation in motion. Ideas will come, inspiration will strike … I can’t manage without it.

Caroline Overington, author of Ghost Child, I Came To Say Goodbye, Matilda Is Missing and now Sisters of Mercy, answers Five Facetious Questions

The Booktopia Book Guru asks

Caroline Overington

author of  Ghost Child, I Came To Say Goodbye, Matilda Is Missing and now Sisters of Mercy

Five Facetious Questions

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1. Every writer spends at least one afternoon going from bookshop to bookshop making sure his or her latest book is facing out and neatly arranged. How far have you gone to draw attention to your own books in a shop?

It’s not a book shop story, but I once asked my Mum to carry a copy of my latest book onto the plane when she was coming to visit me, and to gasp and says things like, ‘wow, this is amazing!’ while pretending to read it. She just rolled her eyes at me.

2. So you’re a published author, almost a minor celebrity and for some reason you’ve been let into a party full of ‘A-listers’ – what do you do?

There is a very good chance that I wouldn’t know who anybody was. I would be bumping into Zayne or Payne or Layne or whatever his name is from One Direction, and saying things like, “And why exactly aren’t you in bed at this late hour?”

And if by chance my 12-year-old daughter was with me, she’d be dying of embarrassment.

3. Some write because they feel compelled to, some are Artists and do it for the Muse, some do it for the cash (one buck twenty a book) and some do it because they think it makes them more attractive to the opposite sex – why do you do write? (NB: don’t say -‘cause I can’t sing, tap or paint!)

I’m attracted to industries with what might some have cruelly called the “dying industries” …. Besides being a novelist, I’m also a newspaper journalist.

My ancestors were coopers and blacksmiths, I’m sure.

4. Have you ever come to the end of writing a particularly fine paragraph, paused momentarily, chuffed with your own genius, only to find you’ve been sitting at the computer nude or with your dress half-way over your head or shaving cream on your face or toilet paper sticking out the back of your undies or paused to find that you’re singing We are the Champions at the top of your voice, having exchanged the words ‘we are’ for ‘I am’ and dropping an ‘s’?

No? Well, what’s your most embarrassing writing moment?

It’s not book related, but I was once asked to cover an important match (game? tournament? whatever) between St Kilda, and some other Victorian football team, maybe Fitzroy … this was ages ago, when I was a cub sports reporter for The Age.

I’d never covered football before, and I went to a lot of trouble to make the copy sing, and quite proudly handed it in.

The sports editor, a busy and wonderful man, read it and said, ‘yes, lovely, marvellous description of the lawn and the leaves and the white picket fence around the ground … but what was the score, Caroline?’

I said, ‘the score?’

He said, ‘Yes, the score. As in, who won??’

It hadn’t occurred to me to take that down, but apparently people want to know.

5. Rodin placed his thinker on the loo – where and/or when do you seem to get your best ideas?

I go out to parties and listen very carefully and when somebody says something smart and funny, and after everyone has stopped laughing, I say: ‘oh, that’s good! Do you have copyright on that?’

Nine times in 10 they’ll be chuffed and they’ll say, ‘Nah, you can have it’ not thinking I actually will steal it from them. But I very definitely will.

Caroline, thank you for playing.

Booktopians are familiar with Caroline’s novels, we have gobbled them down one after the next. We can’t wait for Caroline’s new novel, Sisters of Mercy which is out in November – details below…

Sisters of Mercy

by Caroline Overington

Sisters of Mercy is the haunting story of two sisters – one has vanished, the other is behind bars…

Snow Delaney was born a generation and a world away from her sister, Agnes.

Until recently, neither even knew of the other’s existence. They came together only for the reading of their father’s will – when Snow discovered, to her horror, that she was not the sole beneficiary of his large estate.

Now Snow is in prison and Agnes is missing, disappeared in the eerie red dust that blanketed Sydney from dawn on September 23, 2009.

With no other family left, Snow turns to crime journalist Jack Fawcett, protesting her innocence in a series of defiant letters from prison. Has she been unfairly judged? Or will Jack’s own research reveal a story even more shocking than the one Snow wants to tell?

With Sisters of Mercy Caroline Overington once again proves she is one of the most exciting new novelists of recent years.

Click here to buy Sisters of Mercy from Booktopia,
Australia’s No. 1 Online Book Shop

Garth Nix, author of The Old Kingdom Chronicles, The Keys to the Kingdom series, A Confusion of Princes, Shade’s Children, and many more answers Five Facetious Questions:

The Booktopia Book Guru asks

Garth Nix

author of the The Old Kingdom Chronicles, the Keys to the Kingdom series, A Confusion of Princes, Shade’s Children and many more…

Five Facetious Questions

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1. Every writer spends at least one afternoon going from bookshop to bookshop making sure his or her latest book is facing out and neatly arranged. How far have you gone to draw attention to your own books in a shop?

I once had a circus elephant painted with the cover of one of my books and then I had it put in the right aisle to draw attention, but unfortunately it blocked access and sales actually decreased.

2. So you’re a published author, almost a minor celebrity and for some reason you’ve been let into a party full of ‘A-listers’ – what do you do?

Channel Peter Sellers, lose a shoe, fall in the artificial indoor stream etc

3. Some write because they feel compelled to, some are Artists and do it for the Muse, some do it for the cash (one buck twenty a book) and some do it because they think it makes them more attractive to the opposite sex – why do you do write? (NB: don’t say -‘cause I can’t sing, tap or paint!)

This is a question I have often asked myself, failed to come up with an answer and kept on doing it. It is a socially acceptable way of exercising an inbuilt desire to make stuff up. If I wasn’t a writer I might well be a con man.

4. Have you ever come to the end of writing a particularly fine paragraph, paused momentarily, chuffed with your own genius, only to find you’ve been sitting at the computer nude or with your dress half-way over your head or shaving cream on your face or toilet paper sticking out the back of your undies or paused to find that you’re singing We are the Champions at the top of your voice, having exchanged the words ‘we are’ for ‘I am’ and dropping an ‘s’?

No? Well, what’s your most embarrassing writing moment?

In 1995 I came back from a very long lunch (in those days I was a PR/marketing consultant) to see an email offering my first significant US book deal, whereupon I leaped up and banged my head against my office bookshelf hard enough to make it fall down, so everyone rushed in to see if I needed to be sedated or something.

5. Rodin placed his thinker on the loo – where and/or when do you seem to get your best ideas?

I get ideas all the time, sorting them into some useable form is the hard part. Walking is good, apart from the safety aspects of having a largely disengaged brain. I have to remember “Look left, look right, stop thinking about that story, repeat the looking . . . what was I doing again . . . look out!”

Garth, thank you for playing.

Click here to visit our Garth Nix author page

Garth recently recommended three inspirational non-fiction books for fantasy writers, click here to read more

Cool Stat: As of December 2011, Garth’s books have sold in excess of 5,000,000 copies internationally.

A Confusion of Princes

By GARTH NIX

A grand adventure that spans galaxies and lifetimes, A Confusion of Princes is a page-turning thriller, a tender romance, and a powerful exploration of what it means to be human. Bonus Garth Nix short story ‘Master Haddad’s Holiday’ exclusive to the ANZ edition.

I have died three times, and three times been reborn, though I am not yet twenty in the old earth years by which it is still the fashion to measure time. This is the story of my three deaths, and my life between. My name is Khemri.

Taken from his parents as a child and equipped with biological and technological improvements, Khemri is now an enhanced human being, trained and prepared for the glory of becoming a Prince of the Empire. Not to mention the ultimate glory: should he die, and be deemed worthy, he will be reborn…Which is just as well, because no sooner has Prince Khemri graduated to full Princehood than he learns the terrible truth behind the Empire: there are ten million princes, and all of them want each other dead.

Click here to buy A Confusion of Princes from Booktopia,
Australia’s No.1 Online Book Shop

NEW TITLE: Shade’s Children

by Garth Nix

A dramatic dystopia, telling a story of courage and companionship in the face of ruthless, hi-tech enemies.

The Myrmidons were closing in. Soon they would surround him, silver nets shooting out to catch him in their sticky tracery. Then a Winger would come to take him away. Back to the Dorms. Or…straight to the Meat Factory. Gold-Eye turned to face the Myrmidons and hefted his steel spike. ‘Kill me!’ he screamed at the tall shapes approaching through the fog. ‘Kill me!’

The city seems empty, but there are people – a desperate few – living precariously among the ruins. They are Shade’s Children, and all they have is each other, their Change Talents – and Shade, who masterminds their struggle against the pitiless Overlords. But who, or what, is Shade? And where does his allegiance really lie?

A dramatic story of courage and companionship set against savage forces, from the international bestselling author of the Old Kingdom trilogy and the Keys to the Kingdom series.

Click here to buy Shade’s Children from Booktopia,
Australia’s No.1 Online Book Shop

 

About the Author

Garth Nix grew up in Canberra. He studied for a BA in Professional Writing at the University of Canberra and has travelled to Europe, the Middle East and Asia. Garth has worked as a public servant, bookseller, book editor and literary agent. In 2002, following his outstanding international success, Garth returned to full-time writing (despite his belief that this contributes to the strange behaviour of many authors).

As of December 2011, Garth’s books have sold in excess of 5,000,000 copies internationally. His books have appeared in the bestseller lists of the New York Times, the Sunday Times (UK), Publishers Weekly (US), The Australian, The Bookseller (UK) and Bookseller & Publisher (Australia). His books have been translated into more than 39 languages. Garth lives in Sydney with his wife Anna, who is a publisher, and their two sons.

Click here to visit our Garth Nix author page

Kathy Lette, author of The Boy Who Fell to Earth, Puberty Blues, How to Kill Your Husband and many more, answers Five Facetious Questions

The Booktopia Book Guru asks

Kathy Lette

author of The Boy who Fell to Earth, Puberty Blues, How to Kill Your Husband (and Other Household Handy Hints) and many more…

Five Facetious Questions

——————————–

1. Every writer spends at least one afternoon going from bookshop to bookshop making sure his or her latest book is facing out and neatly arranged. How far have you gone to draw attention to your own books in a shop?

A book signed, is a book sold, so I always insist on signing every copy.

(Book shop assistants see me coming and feign catatonic fits or bomb scares.) I also always hide the book of my enemy behind Hemorrhoids, a Story in Pictures.

2. So you’re a published author, almost a minor celebrity and for some reason you’ve been let into a party full of ‘A-listers’ – what do you do?

Don’t get A-Listeria and gush sycophantically. They’ll think your invitation is a case of Mistaken Nonentity. Many famous people have love bites on their mirrors. Just listen to their self-deluded dialogue, pretend to have a tummy bug and keep rushing to the loo to write it all down, and then later, impale them on the end of your pen.

3. Some write because they feel compelled to, some are Artists and do it for the Muse, some do it for the cash (one buck twenty a book) and some do it because they think it makes them more attractive to the opposite sex – why do you do write? (NB: don’t say -‘cause I can’t sing, tap or paint!)

I only write because it’s cheaper than therapy. Otherwise, I’d be a resident of Couch Canyon, where all the shrinks dwell. But I do think all working mothers – now there’s a tautology – who finish a novel should get the Booker Prize just for finishing , as it’s so much harder for us. Basically we juggle so much we could be in the Moscow State Circus. (I’m regretting not calling my first born Pulitzer, so that I can say that I have one.)

4. Have you ever come to the end of writing a particularly fine paragraph, paused momentarily, chuffed with your own genius, only to find you’ve been sitting at the computer nude or with your dress half-way over your head or shaving cream on your face or toilet paper sticking out the back of your undies or paused to find that you’re singing We are the Champions at the top of your voice, having exchanged the words ‘we are’ for ‘I am’ and dropping an ‘s’? No? Well, what’s your most embarrassing writing moment?

All aspects of a writers’ life are embarrassing.

For any budding authors it would be easier if you could be strapped into a publishing simulator to experience the terrors, to see if you have what it takes. Because the list of requirements is grueling. The honing of cheerfulness to chat show perfection. The haemorrhaging of charisma at book signings. The psychotic episodes which accompany concluding your comic masterpiece after you have stopped finding it funny. (Satires are like sausages you really don’t want to know what goes into making them. But creating one can sometimes prove as much fun as removing your own IUD with barbecue tongs.)

Then there’s the loneliness. I occasionally get so sick of my own company that even my imaginary friend gets bored and runs off to play with someone more interesting.

Worst of all is the dreaded book tour which involves flying hundreds of miles from Dipstick, Ohio, to Buffalo Fart, Wyoming, for a one minute appearance on breakfast radio with a member of the Illiterati whose reading material is limited to his bank balance and tarot cards.

5. Rodin placed his thinker on the loo – where and/or when do you seem to get your best ideas?

Those of us who had a perfectly happy childhood should be able to sue our parents for deprivation of literary royalties. I’m reduced to doing all my research in a very scientific, in-depth fashion over cappuccinos with girlfriends. That’s all I do really, write down the way women talk when there’s no men around.

Kathy, thank you for playing.

Click here to order
The Boy who Fell to Earth
from Booktopia,
Australia’s No. 1 Online Book Shop

Click here to see all of Kathy’s titles

The Boy Who Fell To Earth

Told with Kathy Lette’s razor-sharp wit, this is a funny, quirky and tender story of a mother’s love for her son – and of a love affair that has no chance of running smoothly.

Meet Merlin. He’s Julia’s bright, beautiful son – who just happens to be autistic. Since Merlin’s father, the reserved, cerebral workaholic Jeremy, left them in the lurch shortly after Merlin’s diagnosis, Julia has made Merlin the centre of her world. Struggling with the joys and tribulations of raising her adorable yet challenging son, Julia doesn’t have room for any other man in her life… so why bother trying to find one?

When Julia realises she’s becoming increasingly cynical about life in general, she finally resolves to dip a toe back into the world of dating. Things don’t go quite to plan, yet just as Julia is resolved to a life of singledom once more, the most imperfectly perfect man for her and her son lands on her doorstep. But then, so does Jeremy, begging for forgiveness and a second chance…

Read an extract

Click here to order
The Boy who Fell to Earth
from Booktopia,
Australia’s No. 1 Online Book Shop

Mal Peet, author of Life: An Exploded Diagram, Keeper, and more, answers Five Facetious Questions

The Booktopia Book Guru asks

Mal Peet

author of Life: An Exploded Diagram, Keeper, The Penatly and more

Five Facetious Questions

1. Every writer spends at least one afternoon going from bookshop to bookshop making sure his or her latest book is facing out and neatly arranged. How far have you gone to draw attention to your own books in a shop?

I’ve set off the fire alarm and rushed around yelling ‘Save the Mal Peet books! For God’s sake save the Mal Peet books!’

2. So you’re a published author, almost a minor celebrity and for some reason you’ve been let into a party full of ‘A-listers’ – what do you do?

Tell the celebs that you’re an English-speaking plumber. You’ll have all their phone numbers and addresses inside ten minutes.

3. Some write because they feel compelled to, some are Artists and do it for the Muse, some do it for the cash (one buck twenty a book) and some do it because they think it makes them more attractive to the opposite sex – why do you do write? (NB: don’t say -‘cause I can’t sing, tap or paint!)

My wife makes me do it. She parades our skeletal, ragged, sobbing children past my desk, knowing it disturbs my sleep.

4. Have you ever come to the end of writing a particularly fine paragraph, paused momentarily, chuffed with your own genius, only to find you’ve been sitting at the computer nude or with your dress half-way over your head or shaving cream on your face or toilet paper sticking out the back of your undies or paused to find that you’re singing We are the Champions at the top of your voice, having exchanged the words ‘we are’ for ‘I am’ and dropping an ‘s’?

No? Well, what’s your most embarrassing writing moment?

Hey – have you guys installed hidden CCTV cameras in my study, or what?

5. Rodin placed his thinker on the loo – where and/or when do you seem to get your best ideas?

They just pop into my head every ten years or so.

Mal, thank you for playing.

Wan tho know more? Mal Peet answered our Ten Terrifying Questions, too.

Click here to buy Keeper from Booktopia,
Australia’s No. 1 Online Book Shop

Did You Know?
Mal Peet will be coming to the
Sydney Writer’s Festival – click here

Zoë Foster, author of The Younger Man, Amazing Face and more, answers Five Facetious Questions

 The Booktopia Book Guru asks

Zoë Von Foster

author of The Younger Man, Amazing Face, Textbook Romance, Playing the Field and Air Kisses

Five Facetious Questions

 ——————————-

1. Every writer spends at least one afternoon going from bookshop to bookshop making sure his or her latest book is facing out and neatly arranged. How far have you gone to draw attention to your own books in a shop?

One afternoon? Clearly the authors you’re speaking are not only crafty bookshop re-arrangers, but they are liars too. I do some stealth interior decorating every time I walk past any book shop, always. My preferred move is the Stack and Sign, which involves me taking up a stack of my books to the counter, smiling like a loon, and asking the cute person serving

Zoë Von Foster

“Would you like me to sign these?” before awkwardly explaining I’m not just a weird woman with a penchant for vandalism and megolomania, but the author. Once signed, those babies are front and centre, and sometimes even get a sticker saying “signed copy” which is terrifically enticing for potential buyers.

2. So you’re a published author, almost a minor celebrity and for some reason you’ve been let into a party full of ‘A-listers’ – what do you do?

Drink the champagne, try not to get people’s names or current/exciting/noteworthy projects incorrect, drink the champagne, check my teeth for canape residue, drink the champagne, talk someone’s ears off about the merits of Tumblr, drink the champagne, wonder why everyone has left, go to drink the champagne but find there is none left, reluctantly go outside to find a taxi, arrive home and ravenously eat toast.

3. Some write because they feel compelled to, some are Artists and do it for the Muse, some do it for the cash (one buck twenty a book) and some do it because they think it makes them more attractive to the opposite sex – why do you do write? (NB: don’t say -‘cause I can’t sing, tap or paint!)

I write because I love to write. I find it easy, and enjoyable, and exciting and lots of other ’e’ words. To not write would surely cause me distress.

4. Have you ever come to the end of writing a particularly fine paragraph, paused momentarily, chuffed with your own genius, only to find you’ve been sitting at the computer nude or with your dress half-way over your head or shaving cream on your face or toilet paper sticking out the back of your undies or paused to find that you’re singing We are the Champions at the top of your voice, having exchanged the words ‘we are’ for ‘I am’ and dropping an ‘s’? No? Well, what’s your most embarrassing writing moment?

I have plenty of moments akin to the one you reference, but what is genuinely embarrassing for me is that I am a complete fraud. I don’t know what’s going on in the book world, I don’t know the hot new books or authors, (“Judy Blume. Now there’s an author!”) I never look cool and in-the-know when interviewed and it’s something I need to address, because it’s arrogant and lazy not to.

5. Rodin placed his thinker on the loo – where and/or when do you seem to get your best ideas?

In the shower, or on walks or runs. I was struggling to find an ending to Playing The Field and went for a run to clear my frustrated, exhausted brain. The idea hit me twenty minutes in and I bolted home and wrote furiously for hours. Mum’s always saying the brain needs breaks and new stimulation to function optimally, and I suppose that episode proved it for me.

Zoë, thank you for playing.

Pleasure!

Click here to buy The Younger Man from Booktopia,
Australia’s No.1 Online Book Shop

Matthew Green (aka Matthew Dicks), author of Memoirs Of An Imaginary Friend, answers Five Facetious Questions

The Booktopia Book Guru asks

Matthew Green

(aka Matthew Dicks)

author of Memoirs Of An Imaginary Friend,Unexpectedly, Milo and Something Missing

Five Facetious Questions

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1. Every writer spends at least one afternoon going from bookshop to bookshop making sure his or her latest book is facing out and neatly arranged. How far have you gone to draw attention to your own books in a shop?

Last year I was scheduled to do a reading at a now-defunct Borders bookstore in Avon, Connecticut. When I arrived, a small crowd of would-be attendees were already gathered near the front of the store, waiting for a place to sit. I found the manager and was told that I was to sit at the small table at the front of the store and sign books for interested customers. I explained that my intention was to speak and read from my book and that the crowd already gathered was expecting the same, but the manager explained to me that this was not how they normally handled author appearances. Then he disappeared.

With more than a dozen people wanting to hear me speak, including an elderly couple who needed to sit, I asked the audience if they wouldn’t mind relocating to the cafe with me. After some quick rearranging of furniture, we converted the Borders’ cafe into a more traditional speak space, complete with rows of seating and a makeshift podium (a stack of books).  I spoke and answered questions for almost an hour.

I was concerned that the manager might complain about my commandeering of furniture and space in his store, but he never reappeared. After my talk, a couple of my more loyal fans moved a table from the cafe into the front display area of the store and used the signage that Borders had provided for my appearance to create a display of my books equal to those already occupying the space.

I’m not sure how long that display lasted, but it still looked great when I finally left.

2. So you’re a published author, almost a minor celebrity and for some reason you’ve been let into a party full of ‘A-listers’ – what do you do?

Since very few people know what the average author looks like, I’d probably send my slightly better looking, slightly more affable friend to the party, posing as me, in order to make a better first impression than I ever could.

I’m the kind of person who has to grow on you.

3.Some write because they feel compelled to, some are Artists and do it for the Muse, some do it for the cash (one buck twenty a book) and some do it because they think it makes them more attractive to the opposite sex – why do you do write? (NB: don’t say -‘cause I can’t sing, tap or paint!)

I write for three primary reasons:

    1. I write in order to impress the pretty girl who I married.
    2. I write because I have always loved storytelling, and writing allows me to engage in storytelling across the boundaries of time and space.
    3. I write because I both fear and despise the finality of death and am in a constant struggle to establish permanence in this world. Writing provides me a modicum of permanence.

4. Have you ever come to the end of writing a particularly fine paragraph, paused momentarily, chuffed with your own genius, only to find you’ve been sitting at the computer nude or with your dress half-way over your head or shaving cream on your face or toilet paper sticking out the back of your undies or paused to find that you’re singing We are the Champions at the top of your voice, having exchanged the words ‘we are’ for ‘I am’ and dropping an ‘s’?

No? Well, what’s your most embarrassing writing moment?

While I’m still not sure how embarrassed I should be about the scenario, many people, including the doctors and nurses in the room at the time, found it appalling that I was working on my second novel in between contractions during the birth of our first child.

But for the record, there is a lot of time between contractions in the beginning of labour, and my wife fully supported my decision. She knew that completion of that novel would mean that she could take a year or two off from work in order to stay home with our baby, so the sooner I finished the book, the better.

She’s always been a practical woman.  Besides, how much help could I really be during all that pushing?

5. Rodin placed his thinker on the loo – where and/or when do you seem to get your best ideas?

It sounds silly, but the shower is an especially productive place for ideas. It is one of the only times in my day when I am completely disconnected from outside stimuli, and it is therefore the place where ideas and solutions tend to emerge.

I take at least two showers a day.

Matthew, thank you for playing.

In Memoirs of an Imaginary Friend, Green has done something quite remarkable. He has written a book which requires an adult intellect, and adult emotions, to navigate despite presenting it entirely from the perspective of the child within us all. It is a tense psychological thriller, and in parts, it is an absolute page-turner. And he has penned a warm and moving story about life, death, love, loyalty and destiny. This is no block-buster, but if you are anything like me, Memoirs of an Imaginary Friend will leave you sadder, happier and itching to talk to someone about the ingenious, the incredible, the invisible Budo. Toni Whitmont, Editor in Chief

To read Toni’s Review of Memoirs of an Imaginary Friend in full – click here.

Click here to order a copy of Memoirs Of An Imaginary Friend from Booktopia, Australia’s No.1 Online Book Shop

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