REVIEW: The Queen of the Tearling by Erika Johansen (Review by Hayley Shephard)

the-queen-of-the-tearlingThe book world is abuzz with the publication of The Queen of the Tearling. Likened to Game of Thrones for its epic setting and brutal violence, it has poignant moments that are reminiscent of the era of Queen Elizabeth Ist, and tells the story of a burdened girl in a dystopian world. Is it any wonder why I couldn’t stop reading? And why Emma Watson has chosen to play the lead in the upcoming film, despite hinting that she would steer clear from another big budget adaptation?

Kelsea Glynn is 19, and after the death of her mother, has reached the age whereby she can take the throne, currently occupied by her uncle, who has brought destruction to the land of the Tearling under the influence of a nearby nation. Kelsea was placed away from the reach of evil as an infant and treated in her formative years as a future ruler who needs to survive to see that crown put on her and not her head on the floor. But will Kelsea grow to become the leader she was destined to be?

The book delves deeper into the mindset of someone who has always been beaten down and looked down upon by those who remember her Mother; a vain woman whose rule made Tearling ripe for the taking. Kelsea wants to change the lives of her people but her dreams remain unfulfilled, stopped by those who have only taken oaths to escort her to safety and no further.

Kelsea could be any one of us, but while we don’t have to try and survive and rule at the same time, many of us have to take things on the chin and accept that we can’t have everything we want, especially when it is at the expense of other things in life.

Johansen, Erika2

Author: Erika Johansen

Over the course of the book Kelsea battles against all odds to fight back against the overshadowing country of Mortmesme, which expects large and regular shipments of Tearling men and women of all different ages, a legacy from her Mother’s troubled rule. Kelsea is not strikingly beautiful like her mother, but within her there is a fight she never had. She also has a type of crystal, a crystal that makes her powerful and yet she fears the implications of using it.

Erika Johansen’s writing style is dense, full of riddles and puzzling stories. I was filled with questions. Who is her father? What is this crystal? Who is that ruling bitch from Mortmesme really?

Clearly I already need the second book, so I can start to see Kelsea grow and change into maybe not only a great leader, but a just one.

And I guess Emma Watson feels the same way.

Grab a copy of The Queen of the Tearling here

REVIEW: The Cuckoo’s Calling (Review by Hayley Shephard)

the-cuckoo-s-callingFrom the outset I want to say I’m a HUGE J.K. Rowling fan, but I’ve never really been a fan of crime fiction, and as I started reading The Cuckoo’s Calling, I wondered if Rowling would win me over. With the words over-flowing I asked myself whether I would be able to keep track or even remember the many characters who could possibly be attached to the apparent suicide of one model named, Lula Landry.

But as I kept reading I found myself more interested in the story and more eager to follow Detective Cormoran Strike, in his quest to find the killer, which at first even he is sceptical exists.

The abundance of adjectives and verbs helped me to better picture the characters and crime scenes that inhabit this modern-day London, or more specifically, the celebrity obsessed world that we live in and those that covet its riches.jkrowling

After each chapter I drew my own conclusions from the evidence presented to me through the detailed detective work of Cormoran Strike. I got that eerie feeling you get from certain characters and that pity you develop for others. These feelings helped me to group together my three final suspects.

Of my three suspects, one was the killer, so I was certainly proud of myself. But I guess that is what crime novels are all about: they present you with many suspects that you must break-down, but you are still left with a few.

Once again, J.K. Rowling has done it. Post Harry Potter, there’s been a big hole in my life that I needed to fill. Rowling has not only filled it, but crime fiction now has a new fan.

Click here to buy The Cuckoo’s Calling from Booktopia,
Australia’s Local Bookstore

Want a signed copy of J.K. Rowlings’ The Casual Vacancy?

Just buy a copy of J.K. Rowling’s The Cuckoo’s Calling and go in the draw!

Click here to buy The Cuckoo’s Calling from Booktopia,
Australia’s Local Bookstore

King Hall by Scarlett Dawn: A Review by Booktopia’s Hayley Shephard

Booktopia’s Hayley Shephard is one of the most prolific readers. Here she reviews Scarlett Dawn’s new ebook King Hall.

King Hall is a fantasy, full of love, friendship and heartbreak.

Sound familiar? Well it’s not.

The main character Lily Ruckler, is a hybrid: born from a vampire father and a shifter mother. While it’s surprising that these two types of creatures mix in this story, you come to find it is actually taboo – well sort of. The idea of mixing these two completely different creatures, who have long been enemies in the realm of fantasy, is what makes this story so unique and interesting.

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