New Jodi Picoult Novel To Be Published In October – Read An Extract Today

Allen and Unwin have announced the Australian and New Zealand publication of Jodi Picoult’s new novel, Leaving Time.

Due to be released in October 2014, Leaving Time will make the perfect Christmas present so start dropping hints to your loved ones now!

Read an extract of Leaving Time here

Leaving Time

by Jodi Picoult

Alice Metcalf was a devoted mother, loving wife and accomplished scientist who studied grief among elephants. Yet it’s been a decade since she disappeared under mysterious circumstances, leaving behind her small daughter, husband, and the animals to which she devoted her life. All signs point to abandonment – or worse.

Still Jenna – now thirteen years old and truly orphaned by a father maddened by grief – steadfastly refuses to believe in her mother’s desertion. So she decides to approach the two people who might still be able to help her find Alice: a disgraced psychic named Serenity Jones, and Virgil Stanhope, the cynical detective who first investigated her mother’s disappearance and the strange, possibly linked death of one of her mother’s coworkers.

Together these three lonely souls will discover truths destined to forever change their lives. Deeply moving and suspenseful, Jodi Picoult’s 21st novel is a radiant exploration of the enduring love between mothers and daughters.

About the Author

Jodi Picoult is the author of twenty-one novels. Her most recent, The Storyteller, Lone Wolf and Sing You Home, have all been number one on the Australian and New Zealand fiction bestseller lists. Jodi lives in New Hampshire with her husband and three children. Visit Jodi’s author page.

Read an extract of Leaving Time here

The Storyteller by Jodi Picoult – A Review by Andrew Cattanach

Jodi Picoult’s latest offering The Storyteller has been widely acknowledged as her best work for some time. Booktopia’s Andrew Cattanach shares his thoughts.

Rarely do I read a copy of a new Jodi Picoult before my mother. In fact, never have I read a copy of a new Jodi Picoult before my mother. Her bookcase is drowning in books from the bestselling US author, and eagerly awaits news of every upcoming release. Usually I look at my feet awkwardly when listening to her recommendations, but when I heard the premise of The Storyteller I was intrigued.

Like all books by Picoult, The Storyteller explores controversial themes lingering amongst us, this time the holocaust and it’s subsequent war criminals. What happens when you connect with a gentle man, a man loved in the community, and realise he was a part of an atrocity and wants to atone for his sins. What do you do?

That’s the crux of the generation spanning The Storyteller. A conscience story that goes to the very heart of what justice is, and how do we atone for our mistakes, however grievous. When the guilty party calls to be punished for their crimes, will you act?

The book’s central character is Sage Singer. She’s an outsider who works happily at night in a bakery away from the world, burdened by terrible scars on her face from an accident years ago, something she’s struggling to cope with every day of her life. As a narrator, her fragility allows her to step back from the world and evaluate it through careful eyes.

Sage becomes friends with the elderly Josef Weber, a man loved by the community, while working at the bakery and they grow close. Then one day he asks her for a favour: to kill him. Startled, she says no, whereupon he confesses his true role in World War II….

I enjoyed The Storyteller much much more than I thought I would. It’s the first full Jodi Picoult book I’ve read and you know what, I can now see what my mother is on about. The mundane painting of everyday life is juxtaposed beautifully with the emotional intensity that exists between characters. It’s a book that makes you think, rather that simply thinking for itself.

It’s confidently written and while the message is plastered on at times, it leaves enough ground in between for you to explore your own beliefs. It’s skillfully done.

Oh, and one more thing. Sage’s grandmother is a Holocaust survivor. Do you see where this is going? Maybe you do, maybe you don’t…..

Grab a copy of The Storyteller today and find out.

Click here to buy The Storyteller from Booktopia,
Australia’s Local Bookstore

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Andrew Cattanach is a Feature Writer on the Booktopia Blog. You can read his ramblings on twitter here.

Jodi Picoult will be visiting Australia with her daughter Samantha van Leer to promote their novel Between the Lines

From 17 – 27 July, Jodi Picoult will be visiting Perth, Brisbane, Auckland, Sydney and Melbourne with her daughter Samantha van Leer to promote their novel Between the Lines.


Internationally bestselling author Jodi Picoult and her daughter Samantha van Leer team up to create a story about a girl who crosses the border between reality and fantasy in a perilous search for her own happy ending.

What happens when happily ever after … isn’t? Delilah hates school as much as she loves books. In fact, there’s one book in particular she can’t get enough of. If anyone knew how many times she has read and re-read the sweet little fairy tale she found in the library, especially the popular kids, she’d be sent to social Siberia … forever.

To Delilah, though, this fairy tale is more than just words on the page. Sure, there’s a handsome (well, okay, hot) prince, and a castle, and an evil villain, but it feels as if there’s something deeper going on. And one day, Delilah finds out there is. Turns out, this Prince Charming is real, and a certain fifteen-year-old loner has caught his eye. But they’re from two different worlds, and how can it ever possibly work?

Together with her daughter Samantha van Leer, #1 New York Times bestselling author Jodi Picoult has written a classic fairy tale with a uniquely modern twist. Click here to read and extract…

Three Authors Offer Advice for Writers: Jodi Picoult, Zoë Foster and Sebastian Terry

I interview writers every week here on the Booktopia Blog. My Ten Terrifying Questions have been answered by over 250 published authors ranging from mega selling global stars like Jackie Collins and Lee Child to brilliant, relatively unknown debut authors such as Favel Parret and  Rebecca James.

In each of these interviews I ask the following question:

Q. What advice do you give aspiring writers?

Now, for the edification of aspiring writers everywhere, I will pull together answers to this question from three very different writers and post them here once week. Some will inspire, some will confound but all will be interesting and helpful in their own way…


JODI PICOULT

“Write, every day. Even if it’s just for 20 minutes. Don’t answer the phone, don’t talk to your mother, etc. Take a workshop writing course, so you learn to give and get criticism and be your own best editor. And when you reach the point where you think your story is truly the worst piece of garbage created and want to throw it out…don’t.

What you’re REALLY afraid of is finishing and finding out you’re not as good as you assumed you are. Instead, you should finish that story and edit it until it is flawless, and something you’re satisfied with. Otherwise, you’ll never believe you can actually finish any piece of fiction. And read. A ton. It will inspire you to be just as clever, prolific, and eye-opening as the authors you admire..”

Read the full interview here…

Click here to buy Lone Wolf from Booktopia
Australia’s No.1 Online Bookshop


Zoë Foster at Booktopia about to sign a big pile of her new novel, The Younger Man

ZOE FOSTER

“Get it down, get all your ideas and anecdotes down, no matter which order and in what shape. There! You’ve inadvertently just written half your book! Well, maybe not half, but, you know, a good whack of it. I think it makes it a lot easier to write a book when you’ve already got the bones there.

Also – just give me a second to get up onto this soapbox conveniently placed to my left – please stop talking about how you want to write a book, and write a book. It’s no more impressive telling people you “want to write a book,” than it is to say you “want to climb Everest.” You gotta take action! Action is the thing! Action is the thing.

Read the full interview here…

Zoë has also answered the Booktopia Book Guru’s Five Facetious Questions, click here to read

Click here to buy The Younger Man from Booktopia,
Australia’s No.1 Online Book Shop


SEBASTIAN TERRY

“You don’t have to be a ‘writer’ to write. I’m not. You just need a goat.”

Read the full interview here…

Click here to buy 100 Things from Booktopia,
Australia’s No.1 Online Book Shop


For more advice from published writers go here

Jodi Picoult, bestselling author of Lone Wolf, The Pact, My Sister’s Keeper and more, answers Five Facetious Questions

The Booktopia Book Guru asks

Jodi Picoult

bestselling author of Lone Wolf, The Pact, My Sister’s Keeper, Sing You Home, Change of Heart and many more…

Five Facetious Questions

 —————————-

1. Every writer spends at least one afternoon going from bookshop to bookshop making sure his or her latest book is facing out and neatly arranged. How far have you gone to draw attention to your own books in a shop?

I used to move my books to more prominent places in the bookstore – like on top of James Patterson’s piles – when I was first starting out. Better yet, I trained all my relatives to do the same.

2. So you’re a published author, almost a minor celebrity and for some reason you’ve been let into a party full of ‘A-listers’ – what do you do?

Find Hugh Jackman and convince him that he cannot live without me in his life?

3. Some write because they feel compelled to, some are Artists and do it for the Muse, some do it for the cash (one buck twenty a book) and some do it because they think it makes them more attractive to the opposite sex – why do you do write? (NB: don’t say -‘cause I can’t sing, tap or paint!)

Cheesy, I know, but I can’t NOT write. When I stop writing for a while it feels like a monkey on my back. The ideas just swim around my head, making me all cloudy and very crabby. I have to get this stuff out of me, or else it’s a very uncomfortable feeling. I think for me writing is a way to find answers to huge questions that I find myself mulling over as a mom, a wife, a woman.

4. Have you ever come to the end of writing a particularly fine paragraph, paused momentarily, chuffed with your own genius, only to find you’ve been sitting at the computer nude or with your dress half-way over your head or shaving cream on your face or toilet paper sticking out the back of your undies or paused to find that you’re singing We are the Champions at the top of your voice, having exchanged the words ‘we are’ for ‘I am’ and dropping an ‘s’?

No? Well, what’s your most embarrassing writing moment?

I haven’t really had an embarrassing writing moment, but I do have an embarrassing writer moment. I was at a spa, in a sauna, when a woman came in with one of my books and asked me if I was Jodi Picoult, and if I’d sign it. Needless to say, I did not have a pen on me. Good rule of thumb: If your favorite author is naked…wait till she’s clothed before you ask for her autograph!

5. Rodin placed his thinker on the loo – where and/or when do you seem to get your best ideas?

Driving. I zone out and find myself organizing my plot or sometimes coming up with turns of phrase I want to remember. So I write them on my arm as I drive, because I lose pieces of paper, but I don’t lose my arm. I used to write on my kids’ arms too, sometimes, but they’re too old now and won’t let me!

Jodi, thank you very much for playing.

Order Lone Wolf from booktopia.com.au and for a limited time you will receive a free copy of The Pact – click here

Read Jodi’s answers to my TEN TERRIFYING QUESTIONS here

VISIT out Jodi Picoult author page here

Jodi Picoult, bestselling author of Lone Wolf, The Pact, My Sister’s Keeper and more, answers Ten Terrifying Questions

The Booktopia Book Guru asks

Jodi Picoult

bestselling author of Lone Wolf, The Pact, My Sister’s Keeper, Sing You Home, Change of Heart and many more…

Ten Terrifying Questions

 ————————

1. To begin with why don’t you tell us a little bit about yourself – where were you born? Raised? Schooled?

I was born in NY, in suburbia on Long Island. The houses all looked the same and were called the Storybook development. Self-fulfilling prophecy, perhaps? I went to public school and had some great English teachers who encouraged me to write – and to apply to Princeton University, which had one of the best undergraduate creative writing programs in the US. I got accepted and worked there with Mary Morris, primarily (an amazing writer!). I truly believe if not for Mary, I wouldn’t be a writer today.

2. What did you want to be when you were twelve, eighteen and thirty? And why?

A writer. For real. It was my dream, but I never imagined it would happen. At first I didn’t care if anyone ever read my stuff; I just wanted to see it in print. But even when I was thirty and published I dreamed of writing books that sold well enough to actually contribute to my family income (which took much longer than you’d imagine!)

3. What strongly held belief did you have at eighteen that you do not have now?

That what matters the most for your future is finding a career that will help you support your family. I know now that you should follow what you love. The money somehow will come, if you have that passion for your work.

4. What were three works of art – book or painting or piece of music, etc – you can now say, had a great effect on you and influenced your own development as a writer?

GONE WITH THE WIND, because when I read it at age 12 I thought that maybe I could do the same, and create a whole world out of words; THE GREAT GATSBY, because it was my first experience with an unreliable narrator and since then I’ve loved playing with the dichotomy between what the reader knows and what the narrator knows; THE SUN ALSO RISES, because of Hemingway’s parity of language and the way he constantly reminds us there are some topics and emotions that cannot be explained in mere words.

5. Considering the innumerable artistic avenues open to you, why did you choose to write a novel?

Because this story demanded it. I write original musicals, too, which are performed by a teen theater group to raise money for charity, but they are usually of a very different mood/tone. The nice thing about a novel is that it allows you to raise a topic many people don’t want to explore (really, do you want to pick up a nonfiction book about end-of-life care??) However, by living vicariously through the experiences of the characters, the reader can find him/herself learning something personally relevant.

6. Please tell us about your latest novel… Lone Wolf

Lone Wolf + bonus FREE The Pact - Limited Stock - This Offer Will Not Last - Order Now

Edward Warren, 23, has been living in Thailand for five years, a prodigal son who left his family after an irreparable fight with his father, Luke. But he gets a frantic phone call: His dad lies comatose in a NH hospital, gravely injured in the same accident that has also injured his younger sister Cara.

Cara, 17, still holds a grudge against her brother, since his departure led to her parents’ divorce. In the aftermath, she’s lived with her father – an animal conservationist who became famous after living with a wild wolf pack in the Canadian wild. It is impossible for her to reconcile the still, broken man in the hospital bed with her vibrant, dynamic father.

With Luke’s chances for recovery dwindling, Cara wants to wait for a miracle. But Edward wants to terminate life support and donate his father’s organs. Is he motivated by altruism, or revenge? And to what lengths will his sister go to stop him from making an irrevocable decision?

LONE WOLF looks at the intersection between medical science and moral choices. If we can keep people who have no hope for recovery alive artificially, should they also be allowed to die artificially? Does the potential to save someone else’s life with a donated organ balance the act of hastening another’s death? And finally, when a father’s life hangs in the balance, which sibling should get to decide his fate?

Order Lone Wolf from booktopia.com.au and for a limited time you will receive a free copy of The Pact – click here

7. What do you hope people take away with them after reading your work?

I don’t always expect them to change their minds about a controversial issue, but I hope they’ve listened to the other side’s point of view, and asked themselves why they believe what they do.

8. Whom do you most admire in the realm of writing and why?

Alice Hoffman, because she makes writing about love look so incredibly easy. And Yann Martel, because I wish I’d written the Life of Pi.

9. Many artists set themselves very ambitious goals. What are yours?

I’ve been so lucky in my career that I have achieved many of my personal goals for my writing. I would love to have a movie adapted WELL from one of my books (notice I don’t count My Sister’s Keeper as evidence of that). I’d like to be interviewed on a morning wakeup TV show in America (they don’t think fiction writers have anything to say.) And I’d like to see more women reviewed in general by literary outlets like the New York Times and National Public Radio – there is a gender disparity in my country.

10. What advice do you give aspiring writers?

Write, every day. Even if it’s just for 20 minutes. Don’t answer the phone, don’t talk to your mother, etc. Take a workshop writing course, so you learn to give and get criticism and be your own best editor. And when you reach the point where you think your story is truly the worst piece of garbage created and want to throw it out…don’t. What you’re REALLY afraid of is finishing and finding out you’re not as good as you assumed you are. Instead, you should finish that story and edit it until it is flawless, and something you’re satisfied with. Otherwise, you’ll never believe you can actually finish any piece of fiction. And read. A ton. It will inspire you to be just as clever, prolific, and eye-opening as the authors you admire.

Jodi, thank you for playing.

Order Lone Wolf from booktopia.com.au and for a limited time you will receive a free copy of The Pact – click here

UPDATE:

How cool is this!? Jodi Picoult also answered my very silly Five Facetious Questions…

Jodi Picoult answers Five Facetious Questions

Sing You Home by Jodi Picoult

There are very few readers who could claim never to have heard of Jodi Picoult. Her impact on modern publishing has been immense. Now her books are everywhere. But it wasn’t always so.

The Pact was one of those slow burner books that caught the reading world by surprise – a book that friends encouraged friends to read. And long before the film arrived there was My Sister’s Keeper, the book, which booksellers continue to love and hand sell.

What is the secret to Jodi’s success then? Well, she never repeats herself. She has an insatiable interest in difficult moral dilemmas. She lets her curiosity drive her deeper and deeper into sometimes very uncomfortable issues. But she never lectures. The characters and the situations develop naturally. She explores the issue with an open mind and gives you the feeling that she is just as surprised by the developments as her readers are.

About Sing You Home:
Zoe Baxter has spent ten years trying to have a baby, and finally it looks as though her dream is about to come true – she is seven months pregnant. But a terrible turn of events takes away her baby and breaks apart her marriage to Max. In the aftermath she throws herself into her career as a music therapist. When Vanessa, a guidance counsellor, asks Zoe to work with a suicidal teen, Vanessa and Zoe’s relationship moves from business to friendship and then, to Zoe’s surprise, blossoms into love.

When Zoe allows herself to start thinking of having a family again, she remembers that she and Max still have frozen embryos they never used. Max, meanwhile, has found peace at the bottom of a bottle, until he is redeemed by an evangelical church where the pastor has vowed to fight the ‘homosexual agenda’ that threatens traditional family values. This mission becomes personal for Max when Zoe and her partner want permission to raise his unborn child.

Sing You Home is an honest and moving story of contemporary relationships and the consequences of love and desire colliding with science and the law. From tragedy to self-discovery and joy, Zoe, Vanessa and Max will realise the undeniable truth – that you can’t choose who you love.

Jodi Picoult’s novels will grab you from the first line and they will lead you down paths you would not normally choose to go yourself. This can be confronting at times, but so well worth it.

Click here to order Sing You Home $27.95 SAVE 15%

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