Stephanie Alexander, author of The Cook’s Companion, answers Six Sharp Questions

The Booktopia Book Guru asks

Stephanie Alexander

author of The Cook’s Companion

Six Sharp Questions
___________

1. Congratulations, you have a new book. What is it about and what does it mean to you?

Not a new book at all but a thorough revision of my classic and very successful The Cook’s Companion.

2. Times pass. Things change. What are the best and worst moments that you have experienced in the past year or so?

I have moved house which went from being the worst possible experience to go through to the best decision I have made. I also embraced digital technology and worked with a great team to convert the full text of The Cook’s Companion to a marvellous app.

3. Do you have a favourite quote or passage you would be happy to share with us? It doesn’t need to be deep but it would be great if it meant something to you.

My dad said to me! ‘ nothing or nobody is as good or as bad as they first appear’. Interesting observation but not very profound but for some reason it has stuck in my head.

Stephanie-Alexander

Author: Stephanie Alexander

4. Writers have often been described as being difficult to live with. Do you conform to the stereotype or defy it? Please tell us a little about the day to day of your writing life.

Live alone so only have to cope with myself although that is not always easy. I write best early in morning and for long stretches in the weekends.

5. Some writers claim not to be influenced by the needs of the marketplace, while others seem obsessed by it. Would you please describe how the marketplace affects your writing (come on, tell the truth!).

I have been writing about food and produce and the power of the shared table for more than 35 years. Seem to have influenced the marketplace actually as the food media has just gone on expanding as have cookbooks.

6. Unlikely Scenario: You’ve been charged with civilising twenty ill-educated adolescents but you may take only a few books with you. What do you take and why?

The cook’s Companion volume, and also the Cook’s Companion App and get them all cooking.

Stephanie, thank you for playing.

Grab a copy of The Cook’s Companion here


9781920989002The Cook’s Companion

by Stephanie Alexander

The Cook’s Companion has established itself as the kitchen ‘bible’ in over 500,000 homes since it was first published in 1996.

This 2014 revision includes two major new chapters, two expanded chapters, 70 new recipes and a complete revision of the text to reflect changes in the marketplace and new regulations. Stephanie believes that good food is essential to living well: her book is for everyone, every day. She has invaluable information about ingredients, cooking techniques and kitchen equipment, along with inspiration, advice and encouragement and close to 1000 failsafe recipes.

About the Author

For 21 years from 1976, Stephanie Alexander was the force behind Stephanie’s restaurant in Hawthorn, a landmark establishment credited with having revolutionised fine dining in Melbourne. From 1997 to 2005 Stephanie, along with several friends, ran the Richmond Hill Café and Larder, a neighbourhood restaurant renowned for its specialist cheese retailing. In her recently published memoir, A Cook’s Life, she recounts how her uncompromising dedication to good food has shaped her life and changed the eating habits of a nation.

One of Australia’s most highly acclaimed food authors, Stephanie has written fourteen books, including Stephanie’s Menus for Food Lovers, Stephanie’s Seasons and Stephanie Alexander & Maggie Beer’s Tuscan Cookbook (co-author). Her signature publication, The Cook’s Companion, has established itself as the kitchen bible in over 400 000 homes. With characteristic determination, Stephanie initiated the Kitchen Garden at Collingwood College in order to allow young children to experience the very things that made her own childhood so rich: the growing, harvesting, cooking and sharing of good food.

Grab a copy of The Cook’s Companion here

 

Karen Brooks, author of The Brewer’s Tale, answers Six Sharp Questions

The Booktopia Book Guru asks

Karen Brooks

author of The Brewer’s Tale and The Curse of the Bond Riders series

Six Sharp Questions
___________

1. Congratulations, you have a new book. What is it about and what does it mean to you?

Thank you! The Brewer’s Tale is an epic story about a medieval woman’s efforts to support her family in the wake of tragedy by taking up the trade by which her mother’s family prospered: brewing ale. What she doesn’t count on is her humble efforts attracting first the attention and then the enmity of powerful men whose mission is to see her fail at any cost. It’s a story of great passion, terrible betrayal, fierce loyalty; about someone remarkable rising above catastrophe and, despite the forces moving against and with her, never losing hope.

The book means the world to me as it’s the first novel I wrote after losing one of my best friends and being chronically ill as well. The idea came to me during a very dark time and it was a blessing and a delight to write – also the amazing people it brought into my orbit and the long-term impact it’s having are astounding and more than a little bit magic. Because it’s my first work of historical fiction and released into the adult market, it also holds a very dear place in my heart and head. It’s like being a first-time novelist all over again – thrilling and utterly nerve-wracking.

2. Times pass. Things change. What are the best and worst moments that you have experienced in the past year or so?

It’s been a few years of dark and light, but you can’t appreciate one without the other, can you? That whole “you can’t have rainbows without rain” philosophy is very true. On the best side, there’s been the writing of and build up to the publication of The Brewer’s Tale and the enthusiasm and support of my wonderful agent, Selwa Anthony, and fabulous publishers, Harlequin, never mind my husband, Stephen, kids, and friends.

Stephen, inspired by the research he helped me with for the novel, has opened his own craft brewery, Captain Bligh’s Ale and Cider, in Hobart. There was also his riotous 50th in August, shared with fantastic and beloved friends, many who travelled long distances to be with us. There’s nothing like the company and love of family and friends to remind you of how lucky you are and have been, even when you despair. On the worst side, there have been cancer diagnoses, hospital trips, operations, illness, recovery, and sadly, the death of Stephen’s dad, Ron Brooks, and the tragic loss of one of my dearest friends, Sara Douglass.

3. Do you have a favourite quote or passage you would be happy to share with us? It doesn’t need to be deep but it would be great if it meant something to you.tallow

I have two that are meaningful to me. “How vain it is to sit down to write when you have not stood up to live.” Henry David Thoreau
It’s like a kick up the bum and reminder not just to live in your head, but get out there and experience life and love, and all the wonderful risks these entail.

And, “A truth that’s told with bad intent/Beats all the lies you can invent” William Blake.
I can’t stand liars… but I have more trouble with people who use the phrase, “I’m just being honest” or hide behind “honesty” to hurt others. No, you’re not being honest; you’re being mean. So unnecessary – if we were all kinder to each other, and ourselves, the world really would be a better place.

4. Writers have often been described as being difficult to live with. Do you conform to the stereotype or defy it? Please tell us a little about the day to day of your writing life.

Who describes writers that way? Who? Show me! LOL! I think if you asked my husband, you might get a different answer. I don’t think I’m “difficult” to live with… I hope not. A bit schizophrenic sometimes when I am lost in a novel and carrying around dozens of different characters and their voices in my head (Stephen just sighs when I don’t answer him sometimes and says, “You’re in the ‘zone”, aren’t you?”), but otherwise, I believe I’m normal, apart from wanting to talk about the period I’m writing in or comparing standards of living, clothes, politics, customs etc of the past to now… Oh, that makes me sound so boring!

I treat writing as a regular job. I go to my study each morning and work an eight-ish hour day, knock off for dinner, go out on weekends, walk the dogs daily, play with the cats, watch crap and good TV, read, meet up with friends, travel. I’m a professional writer (I also write a weekly newspaper column for the Courier Mail) and do take everything about the work seriously (as in, I respect the profession and everyone involved). The only time I get a little pissed off is when people think because you work at home it’s OK to pop around or phone for a chat – any time. That separation of home and office (when they’re one in the same) isn’t hard for me, but is for some others. Actually, that’s when I can be difficult. Oh dear. A little terse, shall we say? I struggle with being pulled out of the zone… But come beer or wine o’clock, I’m anyone’s… ummm… that came out wrong. You know what I mean!

Author: Karen Brooks

5. Some writers claim not to be influenced by the needs of the marketplace, while others seem obsessed by it. Would you please describe how the marketplace affects your writing (come on, tell the truth!).

I sit somewhere in the middle. I don’t obsess over it but neither do I completely ignore it. As a reader, and someone who reviews books, I am aware of trends and changes, but I don’t let these dictate what I write. Neither will I, say, go and write a book about sparkly vampires (done) or erotica (I don’t think I could – there are others absolutely excellent at that). I take the advice of my agent; write to my strengths, but also with one eye on commercial appeal. I would be a fool not to, I think.

6. Unlikely Scenario: You’ve been charged with civilising twenty ill-educated adolescents but you may take only five books with you. What do you take and why?

Complete Works of William Shakespeare (I know this is sort of cheating, but you can get them in one book!): We’d not only read them together, but also act out each play. If Shakespeare does not cover human experience, plumb emotional depths, prompt laughter, tears, fear, rage, frustration, despair, betrayal, magic, mayhem, great love and passion, as well as terrible tragedy, all of which contribute to understanding and thus civilising humans, then we are lost before we begin. In taking on roles in each play, the kids would invest in the characters and their actions, learn about what motivates people and the consequences of certain choices and behaviours, learn so much about life and each other, and have great fun to boot. If I could only chose one play, I would read and perform Macbeth – what isn’t there to like about ghosts, witches, daggers appearing and disappearing, drunken porters, slaughtering kings, mad queens, walking woods, prophecies, blood and consequences?

Homer: The Odyssey. Great epic fantasy and superhero story all rolled into one with war, traitors, a throne and lives at stake. A great read, an adventure for the ages with powerful lessons at its heart about loyalty, nobility, friendship, honour, love, father-son relationships, forces beyond our control and how the monsters you face are sometimes within.

Philip Pullman: The Northern Lights. Almost for the same reasons as above. A classic story of friendship, courage, risk-taking, trust, loyalty, honour, faith, manipulation and how to rise above the plots and cunning of those who don’t have your best interests at heart. The true meaning of sacrifice is also explored in a tale that spans worlds as well as science, religion and magic.

9780747590583Khaled Hosseini: The Kite Runner. A heart-wrenching and sublime story of friendship, class and ethnic difference, politics and their cruel impact on ordinary people, war, families, terrible brutality, forgiveness and love, told initially through the eyes of a wealthy young boy against the backdrop of the last years of the Afghanistani monarchy. At once moving and shocking, reading this book changes you. It’s a tale that intricately explores how actions and consequences are so interrelated, how seemingly innocent choices (or not so innocent) can have devastating and unforseen outcomes. It explores the damage lies can wield but also how they can be told to protect. Such an ethical, tragically beautiful and beautifully tragic book, populated with characters who sometimes struggle to find their moral compass, it has lessons to teach every reader of any age in abundance. Even unruly, ill-educated teens would love this accessible, wonderful book.

William Goldman: The Princess Bride. Number of reasons I chose this one. Not only is it a great read, but because it’s also a parody of so many other heroic princess-in-distress-is-saved-be unlikely-hero and revenge (Inigo Montoya) fairytales with swords, beasts, giants, ruthless kings, wonky magic, gorgeous leads and flawed side-kicks, it also opens the opportunity to tell the stories it draws from as well. The tale of Westley and Buttercup and the characters that enter their lives and either try to tear them apart or ensure they live “happily-ever-after” (a concept that is also played with in the novel) is timeless, funny, unbearably sad and unputdownable. And, if the ill-educated adolescents have seen the film, we can act it out. I bags being Inigo! “As you wish…”

Karen, thank you for playing.


Karen Brooks’ The Brewer’s Tale is a featured title in Harlequin’s Booktoberfest Showcase, click here for more details

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the-brewer-s-taleThe Brewer’s Tale

by Karen Brooks

It had been Mother’s secret and mine, one passed down through the de Winter women for generations. I would ensure it was kept that way, until I was ready to pass it on. When Anneke Sheldrake is forced to find a way to support her family after her father is lost at sea, she turns to the business by which her mother’s family once prospered: brewing ale.

Armed with her Dutch mother’s recipes and a belief that anything would be better than the life her vindictive cousin has offered her, she makes a deal with her father’s aristocratic employer: Anneke has six months to succeed or not only will she lose the house but her family as well. Through her enterprise and determination, she inadvertently earns herself a deadly enemy.

Threatened and held in contempt by those she once called friends, Anneke nonetheless thrives. But on the tail of success, tragedy follows and those closest to her pay the greatest price for her daring. Ashamed, grieving, and bearing a terrible secret, Anneke flees to London, determined to forge her own destiny. Will she be able to escape her past, and those whose only desire is to see her fail? A compelling insight into the brewer’s craft, the strength of women, and the myriad forms love can take.

Karen Brooks’ The Brewer’s Tale is a featured title in Harlequin’s Booktoberfest Showcase, click here for more details

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Jenny Bond, author of The President’s Lunch and Perfect North, answers Six Sharp Questions

The Booktopia Book Guru asks

Jenny Bond

author of The President’s Lunch and Perfect North

Six Sharp Questions
___________

1. Congratulations, you have a new book. What is it about and what does it mean to you?

The President’s Lunch was an absolute joy to research and write. I began researching the novel at the same time I discovered I was pregnant with my second child. He celebrated his first birthday when I delivered the first draft of the manuscript. I came to know the characters so intimately during that time and it was extremely difficult saying goodbye once the manuscript and editing process were completed. In fact, it took some urging from my husband to press ‘Send’ on the day the first draft was due. In a weird melodramatic way, it was like giving up a child.

So what’s it all about? Set against the dramatic backdrop of the Great Depression, Pearl Harbor and World War II, The President’s Lunch tells the story of Iris McIntosh, an enigmatic young woman rendered homeless by the Depression. When she has a random encounter with Eleanor Roosevelt in a rural gas station her life veers in a remarkable and unexpected direction. A First Lady with a social conscience, the tireless and fiercely compassionate Mrs Roosevelt employs Iris as her secretary. Under Eleanor’s guidance Iris, a woman of natural wit, beauty and intelligence, is introduced to the dynamic and complex inner world of the President, Franklin Delano Roosevelt. Along the way, for better or for worse, she wins the heart of more than one man. But as she recreates herself into a woman of the modern world, a world that has America at its centre, Iris comes to understand that nothing is ever simple – not affairs of state, not matters of the heart and certainly not the hankerings of a person’s appetite.

2. Times pass. Things change. What are the best and worst moments that you have experienced in the past year or so?

The best and worst moments came during a research trip I took to the US with my family. I had researched the Roosevelts from afar for nine months and to find myself walking around their homes and chatting with people who knew them was thrilling. But spending thirty hours travelling from Canberra to Washington DC in order to do that, with an energetic but frustrated six-month-old and a mildly grumpy seven-year-old, was absolutely soul destroying.

3. Do you have a favourite quote or passage you would be happy to share with us? It doesn’t need to be deep but it would be great if it meant something to you.

My favourite passage from a novel has been the same throughout my life. It is the final paragraph from Harper Lee’s To Kill a Mockingbird:

‘He turned out the light and went into Jem’s room. He would be there all night, and he would be there when Jem waked up in the morning.’

When I was a younger I viewed the paragraph from a child’s perspective. It filled me with a great feeling of comfort and safety. Now I am a parent, I read the lines from Atticus’s viewpoint and I understand his motivations clearly.

4. Writers have often been described as being difficult to live with. Do you conform to the stereotype or defy it? Please tell us a little about the day to day of your writing life.

I can be difficult to live with when I’m in the process of editing a book. Becoming angered at cuts and criticisms from editors, I tend to take my frustration out on my husband. However, while I am in the process of writing a novel I am extremely content and agreeable.

My writing week revolves around my children. I work three days a week (school hours) when my two-year-old is in child care and at other times when I can fit it in. However, because I have such an abbreviated work week, I find I have to use my time judiciously to meet deadlines. Fortunately, I can write anywhere and at any time.

5. Some writers claim not to be influenced by the needs of the marketplace, while others seem obsessed by it. Would you please describe how the marketplace affects your writing (come on, tell the truth!).

I write books that I would love to read and, as a 43-year-old woman, I am probably representative of much of the marketplace. So that’s lucky!

6. Unlikely Scenario: You’ve been charged with civilising twenty ill-educated adolescents but you may take only five books with you. What do you take and why?

To Kill a Mockingbird by Harper Lee:  I taught this novel for many years to unruly teenagers. I have not met any adolescent this book has not failed to move.

Lord of the Flies by William Golding: Such a unique and perceptive critique on society. It shows children how meaningful and relevant literature can be.

The Naked Chef by Jamie Oliver: Everyone should know how to cook and the recipes in Jamie’s first cook book are upbeat, fast and simple. Following a recipe teaches people discipline and patience, and it’s fun and tasty!

Pride & Prejudice by Jane Austen: They might not want to read it, but when they get to the end of P&P those twenty uncouth youths will know how to behave in civilised society!

The Mosquito Coast by Paul Theroux:  This is a powerful allegorical novel, heavy with symbolism, that criticises society. In my teaching experience I have found it resonates strongly with teenagers. It’s an anti coming-of-age tale in a way, and is told from the viewpoint of fourteen-year-old Charlie Fox.

Jenny, thank you for playing.

Grab a copy of The President’s Lunch here

 

 


jenny bond (2)The President’s Lunch
by Jenny Bond

Set in Roosevelt’s White House, this is a compelling story of politics, personalities and love that spans one of the most turbulent decades of the twentieth century.

Robbed of her home and job by the Great Depression, the future looks bleak for Iris McIntosh – until a chance encounter with America’s indefatigable First Lady, Eleanor Roosevelt. Propelled into the White House’s brilliant inner circle, Iris finds herself at the centre of momentous change … and her heart torn between two men. But her loyalty lies with a third: the complicated and charismatic President Roosevelt, who will ultimately force her to question everything she believes in. A compelling story of politics and power, love and loss, set in one of the most exciting and cataclysmic periods of history.

Grab a copy of The President’s Lunch here

Carole Wilkinson, the Dragonkeeper series, answers Six Sharp Questions


shadow-sisterThe Booktopia Book Guru asks

Carole Wilkinson

author of Dragonkeeper series and more…

Six Sharp Questions
___________


1. Congratulations, you have a new book. What is it about and what does it mean to you?

Thanks. It is Shadow Sister, the 5th book in the Dragonkeeper series. It follows on from Blood Brothers and is the ongoing adventures of the dragon Kai and Tao, who is coming to terms with being a dragonkeeper. It is a sort of ghost story. There are insects.

2. Times pass. Things change. What are the best and worst moments that you have experienced in the past year or so?

The very best thing in the last year was learning I’m going to be a grandmother in October. Also we are building a holiday house, an earth-covered house, and seeing it progress has been exciting. Finishing another book is another big thing, getting to that stage where you don’t cringe when you read it aloud and you’re happy to send it off into the world. Actually the last 12 months have been huge!

3. Do you have a favourite quote or passage you would be happy to share with us? It doesn’t need to be deep but it would be great if it meant something to you.

The one that springs to mind is “The journey of a thousand li begins with a single step” written by Chinese philosopher Laozi around 6th century BC. It is true of every worthwhile endeavour. There are no shortcuts, you just take it one step at a time.

4. Writers have often been described as being difficult to live with. Do you conform to the stereotype or defy it? Please tell us a little about the day to day of your writing life.

There are times, when I get bogged down in the middle of a book, when I can be pretty cranky. Day to day, it’s not very exciting, not to an observer anyway. I get up early. I sit in front of the computer at 7.30 and I try to write 1000 words each day. Once there’s a completed draft, there is a great deal of re-reading and editing, which I like much more than writing the words for the first time. My idea of a break is to go to the State Library of Victoria or Melbourne Uni Library in the afternoon to look up information. I’m writing a non-fiction book at the moment, so there’s a lot of that happening.

5. Some writers claim not to be influenced by the needs of the marketplace, while others seem obsessed by it. Would you please describe how the marketplace affects your writing (come on, tell the truth!).

I think, “I wonder if anyone will want to read this?”, but I don’t start by wondering what will be successful or hit the spot in the market at this point in time. I write what I am interested in, what will keep me engaged and keen to get in front of the computer every morning. I hope that my enthusiasm will filter into the book and others will be enthusiastic about the story too.

 

6. Unlikely Scenario: You’ve been charged with civilising twenty ill-educated adolescents but you may take only five books with you. What do you take and why?

You do like to pose hard questions! I don’t think there is one version of being “civilised”. I would just get them to be keen readers and then they can take their own path to whatever sort of education suits them.
This is a topic worth many hours, if not days, of contemplation, but…I have a book to write. So just off the top of my head:

  1. Lord of the Rings by J R R Tolkien, for total immersion in another world.
  2. The Hitchhiker’s Guide to the Galaxy by Douglas Adams, to make them laugh.
  3. The Fault in Our Stars by John Green, to make them cry.
  4. Tales of Mystery and Imagination by Edgar Allan Poe, to scare the pants off them.
  5. Winnie the Pooh by A A Milne, in case they missed out on reading as a kid.

Carole, thank you for playing.

Grab a copy of Shadow Sister here

 

Jesse Fink, author of The Youngs: The Brothers Who Built AC/DC, answers Six Sharp Questions

The Booktopia Book Guru asks

Jesse Fink

author of The Youngs: The Brothers Who Built AC/DC

Six Sharp Questions

——————————

1. Congratulations, you have a new book. What is it about and what does it mean to you?

The Youngs is a tribute to three extraordinary Scottish-Australian brothers – George, Angus and Malcolm Young – who changed the face of rock music around the world. It’s a critical appreciation that is told through the stories of 11 important Young songs, starting with The Easybeats’ ‘Good Times’ through to AC/DC’s ‘Thunderstruck’; not a traditional biography. It’s the 40th anniversary of AC/DC’s formation in November and they’ve come a long way in that time to be the biggest band in the world. The Young brothers hurt a few people getting there. They’re very tough businessmen as well as being superb musicians. Last year they were adjudged to be worth about $300 million and didn’t make any music.

It’s my third book, a real departure from my last one, Laid Bare, and it was a lot of fun to write. It’s not just another AC/DC book. It’s offering something different. It tells a new story.

Grab a copy of The Youngs: The Brothers Who Built AC/DC here

2. Times pass. Things change. What are the best and worst moments that you have experienced in the past year or so?

Getting an agent at a top literary agency in New York was probably the highlight, plus getting a film agent for Laid Bare in Hollywood. Having the right people in your corner makes all the difference to an author’s career. The Youngs is being published in the United States and I’m really looking forward to that.

Low point? A close personal friend losing her mother to cancer and then her father having a heart attack the same week. That put a lot of things in perspective for me. Live your life now rather than later.

3. Do you have a favourite quote or passage you would be happy to share with us?

It’s a line from Tony Currenti, one of the drummers on AC/DC’s 1975 debut album, High Voltage, who walked away from music in 1977 and opened up a pizzeria. He hasn’t touched a drum kit since, despite his playing appearing on AC/DC releases (High Voltage, ’74 Jailbreak, Backtracks, Bonfire) that have sold millions. I asked him why he didn’t continue with music.

He replied: “It was easy to give it away. With a pizza shop it’s not possible to be a musician. It’s one or the other.” I’m still laughing at that. Quote of a lifetime. He played with AC/DC for god’s sake, was even asked to join the band, and he gave it all up to work with pizza dough. He’s a wonderful character.

4. Writers have often been described as being difficult to live with. Do you conform to the stereotype or defy it? Please tell us a little about the day to day of your writing life.

Completely conform to the stereotype. I don’t start the day without a coffee at my favourite café in Potts Point and might as well live there. I’d like to. They took out the power points in spite of me. I do a bit of work on my laptop – the low-level ambient noise helps, I find – then I go for a run to the Opera House and back, stopping by my local gym. Running helps me formulate ideas and I always listen to music when I’m doing it. In the afternoons I go back to the café and do more writing on my laptop.

When I’m in book mode I tend to obsess a bit with rewrites and edits and that will see me work well into the early hours of the morning. It’s very hard to maintain a relationship while writing a book. You are consumed by the work, even when you’re not sitting down, writing. The majority of the work is mental: just thinking about what you’re going to write.

This book also involved a fair bit of travelling, research and countless hours spent trying to lock down interviews with people who had never been interviewed before. Plus many more hours of transcribing: an onerous task. I’m a crappy typist.

5. Some writers claim not to be influenced by the needs of the marketplace, while others seem obsessed by it. Would you please describe how the marketplace affects your writing (come on, tell the truth!).

The marketplace has never determined what I’ve written or how I’ve written it. I’ve always approached a project being absolutely passionate about the subject rather than motivated by commercial opportunity. You don’t write books for the money. But I certainly appreciate the need to market books in a certain way and I learned a lot from Laid Bare, especially how writers are marketed and the crucial role of marketing in modern publishing. The fact that AC/DC was having their 40th anniversary in 2013 was just a bonus.

I wanted to write the book for other, more personal reasons, which I explain in the book. The Youngs aren’t going out of their way to write it themselves. They’re notoriously private.

6. Unlikely Scenario: You’ve been charged with civilising twenty ill-educated adolescents but you may take only five books with you. What do you take and why?

You would probably want to select books that will awaken their sense of wonder, that are fun to read, that compel them to think about their place in the world, what they can contribute, and what it means to be human. So war/genocide, sex/relationships, popular culture, travel and soccer (the sport the world plays) are good places to start: Swimming to Cambodia by Spalding Gray, Fear of Flying by Erica Jong, If You’re Talking To Me, Your Career Must Be In Trouble by Joe Queenan, Chasing The Monsoon by Alexander Frater and The Hand of God by Jimmy Burns.

Jesse, thank you for playing.

Grab a copy of The Youngs: The Brothers Who Built AC/DC here

Cathryn Hein, author of Heartland, answers Six Sharp Questions

heartlandThe Booktopia Book Guru asks

Cathryn Hein

author of Heartland and more…

Six Sharp Questions

———————————-

1. Congratulations, you have a new book. What is it about and what does it mean to you?

Heartland is the story of Callie Reynolds, a young woman who, since the death of her sister, has spent her life running from those who care for her. When her grandmother dies and leaves her Glenmore, a property Callie has always loved, she’s torn between what her heart aches for and the powerful need to honour her sister’s memory. All she wants is to sell up and move on, but the world keeps conspiring against her. The farm is full of memories and longing. Then there are the animals she’s been saddled with and an injured neighbour she feels responsible for – all surmountable problems. Until a very sexy and determined ex-soldier comes along and complicates matters…

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Mandy Magro, author of Flame Tree Hill, answers Six Sharp Questions

flame-tree-hillThe Booktopia Book Guru asks

Mandy Magro

author of Flame Tree Hill and more…

Six Sharp Questions

—————————

1. Congratulations, you have a new book. What is it about and what does it mean to you?

Thanks, I’m thrilled to see Flame Tree Hill hitting the marketplace! Kirsty Mitchell is involved in a terrible accident which haunts her to this very day. Returning to Flame Tree Hill after three years spent overseas she finds herself coming face to face with her past demons, the man she has loved since she was a teenager and the absolute terror of being told she has breast cancer. Kirsty has never been a quitter, and that isn’t about to change. Drawing from the strength of her family and friends while immersing herself in the beauty of FNQ she fights the cancer with everything she has. That is, until she reveals an earth-shattering secret and the budding relationship she’s begun with local vet, Aden, begins to crumble.

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