Three Authors Offer Advice for Writers: Kirsten Tranter, Tim ‘Rosso’ Ross, and LEE CHILD

by |April 14, 2012

I had promised to post a new set of three authors offering writing tips every Friday evening but this is the second third fourth time in a row I have forgotten to do so. Hmmm… Maybe I should just promise to post every Saturday? Or even better, forgo the promise… I know what I’ll do.

New announcement: I have long thought the advice offered to aspiring writers in answer to question ten of my Ten Terrifying Questions deserved a vehicle of its own. Well, here it is. I shall post the advice of three very different writers  every [mumble mumble]. Is that clear? Every [mumble mumble].

Bit of history: On March 1, 2010 I posted the first of the Ten Terrifying Questions author interviews. Since that date I have posted over 200 interviews with authors ranging from mega selling global stars like Jackie Collins and Lee Child to brilliant, relatively unknown debut authors such as Favel Parret and  Rebecca James.

Q. What advice do you give aspiring writers?


LEE CHILD

“Ignore all advice. There’s room for only one mind on your side of the transaction, and it needs to be yours and yours alone.”

Read the full interview here…

Click here to buy The Affair from Booktopia Australia’s No.1 Online Bookshop


TIM “ROSSO” ROSS

“Just type. Also, keep a book with notes in it and collate thoughts in your head when you run, walk or are on the train – it is as, or if not more, important as putting pen to paper.

If that doesn’t work, put a sign on your fridge that says, “If that dingbat Rosso can write a book, anybody can.””

Read the full interview here…

Click here to buy Mum Had a Kingswood from Booktopia Australia’s No.1 Online Book Shop


KIRSTEN TRANTER

Read as widely as you can, and train your eye to see what good writers are doing well and how they do it.

Bring to your writing the kind of passion and urgency that Donna Tartt‘s narrator describes in the prologue to The Secret History:

I suppose at one time in my life I might have had any number of stories, but now there is no other. This is the only story I will ever be able to tell.” I think I was only able to find the courage to write my first novel once I truly felt that myself.”

Read the full interview here…

Click here to buy A Common Loss from Booktopia Australia’s No.1 Online Book Shop


For more advice from published writers go here

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